ACTS ABOUT WD-40

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http://www.dhmo.org/facts.html
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Inhaling water vapor is not only NOT lethal, it is quite healthful. Ever used a humidifier to make a room more comfortable?
Inhaling wd-40 vapor, even in relatively small amounts can kill you.
You are an idiot.
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BinaryBillTheSailor@Sea++.com wrote:

Tell me how I can kill myself inhaling vapors and no liquid phase mist! I doubt it's much easier than jumping into the deep end of a swimming pool and drowning myself!
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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On Sun, 25 Apr 2004 05:45:06 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@manx.misty.com (Don Klipstein) wrote:

I'm sure a Darwin candidate such as you or Kinch could manage to do either quite easily. I'm looking forward to reading about it.
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What exactly about my headers has you in such a tizzy, goofball?
WD40 is mostly poison. You have yet to present anything to prove that assertion wrong.
C'mon Asshole, answer the question that proves you are an idiot How much WD40 can you safely drink? You CAN'T Answer that question without admitting that you are wrong and a fool.
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Someone with no name in their headers writes:

No, it is not toxic in the usual chemical sense. It causes aspiration pneumonia if inhaled as a liquid into the lungs. Because of its low viscosity and surface tension, it will likely be accidentally inhaled if swallowed. THIS aspiration hazard is why petroleum distillates are always labeled "harmful or fatal if swallowed", NOT due to toxicity.
By your logic, water is "poison", because it can also kill you, if aspirated.
These are the facts. You apparently can't follow this. Moreover, you are full of baseless insults and anonymous spew. All of this indicates a debased, cowardly intellect, which deserves no further response.
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So, you admit that you are full of shit, and that you would be injured or killed if you drank WD40 in any amount. Okay! Apology accepted.
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I would be willing to watch a "short" clip while you drank WD-40. Perhaps a couple of 8 oz glasses of it. Pleased be careful to drink slowly so you don't aspirate any of it.
RB
Richard J Kinch wrote:

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Anyway, I thought it was darned interesting. I don't know why so many people are getting upset about his claim that it is not intestinally toxic - believe it, or don't, who gives a shit? I don't think anyone's going to drink a cup because they read it wasn't toxic on usenet. Get a life, people.
- Bill

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Fisher Price wrote:

Been around machinists for many years. They (generally) don't read the labels. WD-40 is popular as a cutting lubricant when doing light cuts, especially when fly cutting, (large circular cutters) aluminum. The heat combined with the aluminum dust and WD-40 chemical fog makes for a nice mixture of respiratory goodies. Like so many little short cuts in the work place the effects don't show up until years later. Usually in retirement when being a tad immobilized can cause some retrospective second guessing.
Frank
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The difference between "medicine" and "poison" is dosage.
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Off to a bad start "Convair" manufactured the Atlas missile...
And "lubricates" needs to be replaced with "temporarily lubricates" for most of the listed applications.
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It apparently works pretty well as a cutting fluid- most of its "lubricant" is apparently kerosene. But I wouldn't actually use it for lubrication.
Gregm
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wrote:

There is absolutely no kerosene in WD-40.
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BinaryBillTheSailor@Sea++.com wrote:

If you know that, could you tell us what is in there?
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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On Tue, 13 Apr 2004 04:51:17 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@manx.misty.com (Don Klipstein) wrote:

No I can't. The company keeps the actual ingredients a trade secret, but they post a FAQ that lists a few things commonly guessed that are NOT in WD40, including silicone and kerosene. I gave a link to the site.
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BinaryBillTheSailor@Sea++.com writes:

Ahh, I was confused- apparently kerosene is also a good cutting fluid. Now if the WD-40 people used some nice grade machine oil instead of whatever the stuff is they put in there, I might actually use it.
Gregm
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wrote:

Kerosene is essentially a very, very light oil.
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This is Turtle.
There is one problem with it. It will vaporize in 60 to 90 days and you have to reapply it to protect metal. Also you can't use it in electric motor for it will vaporize and leave the bearing dry in atleast 90 days. One you start using it, You have to keep on using it to protect the metal.
Now it is some good stuff but it does have it's draw backs.
TURTLE
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wrote:

I used to service and repair office machines and industrial equipment. WD 40 is very good for temporary repairs such as loosening stuck parts. That's not quite the same as lubricating the same parts as whatever lubricating properties WD 40 may seem to exhibit it dries off quite quickly to leave behind bare metal surfaces. The equipment then gets stuck again or create wear marks. In any case bearings and gears in modern electronic equipment such as computer printers and printer calculator machines are meant to run dry. Applying WD 40 or even light machine oil creates more problems than they are worth.
I can't say much of the long list of unorthodox uses found for WD 40. But one very useful application is to remove hardened and "permanently" stuck labels. Spray some on a old gummed label and wait a few minutes. The label then peels off easily like a wet water slide decal.
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