ACTS ABOUT WD-40

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Subject: FACTS ABOUT WD-40 The product began from a search for a rust preventative solvent and de-greaser to protect missile parts. WD-40 was created in 1953 by three technicians at the San Diego Rocket Chemical Company. It's name comes from the project that was to find a "water displacement" compound. They were successful with the fortieth formulation, thus WD-40. The Corvair Company bought it in bulk to protect their Atlas missile parts. The workers were so pleased with the product, they began smuggling (also known as "shrinkage" or "stealing") it out to use at home. The executives decided there might be a consumer market for it and put it in aerosol cans. The rest, as they say, is history It is a carefully guarded recipe known only to four people. Only one of them is the "brew master." There are about 2.5 million gallons of the stuff manufactured each year. It gets it's distinctive smell from a fragrance that is added to the brew. Ken East says there is nothing in WD-40 that would hurt you. Here are some of the uses: Protects silver from tarnishing Cleans and lubricates guitar strings Gets oil spots off concrete driveways Gives floors that 'just-waxed' sheen without making it slippery Keeps flies off cows Restores and cleans chalkboards Removes lipstick stains Loosens stubborn zippers Untangles jewelry chains Removes stains from stainless steel sinks Removes dirt and grime from the barbecue grill Keeps ceramic/terra cotta garden pots from oxidizing Removes tomato stains from clothing Keeps glass shower doors free of water spots Camouflages scratches in ceramic and marble floors Keeps scissors working smoothly Lubricates noisy door hinges on vehicles and doors in homes Gives a children's play gym slide a shine for a super fast slide Lubricates gear shift and mower deck lever for ease of handling on riding mowers Rids rocking chairs and swings of squeaky noises Lubricates tracks in sticking home windows and makes them easier to open Spraying an umbrella stem makes it easier to open and close Restores and cleans padded leather dashboards in vehicles, as well as vinyl bumpers Restores and cleans roof racks on vehicles Lubricates and stops squeaks in electric fans Lubricates wheel sprockets on tricycles, wagons and bicycles for easy handling Lubricates fan belts on washers and dryers and keeps them running smoothly Keeps rust from forming on saws and saw blades, and other tools We're not through. Here's more; Removes splattered grease on stove Keeps bathroom mirror from fogging Lubricates prosthetic limbs Keeps pigeons off the balcony (they hate the smell) Removes all traces of duct tape I have even heard of folks spraying it on their arms, hands, knees, etc., to relieve arthritis pain. One fellow claims spraying it on fishing lures attracts fish. WD-40 has been designated the "official multi-purpose problem-solver of NASCAR," a ringing endorsement if there ever was one. I told my NASCAR loving sons about this and they said they couldn't imagine how WD-40 can solve the Jeff Gordon problem. In celebration of their 50th year, the company conducted a contest to learn the favorite uses of it's customers and fan club members, (Yes, there is a WD-40 Fan Club). They compiled the information to identify the favorite use in each of the 50 states. Naturally I was curious about Georgia and Alabama and found the favorite use in both states was that it "penetrates stuck bolts, lug nuts, and hose ends." Florida's favorite use was "cleans and removes lovebugs from grills and bumpers." California's favorite use was penetrating the bolts on the Golden Gate Bridge. Let me close with one final, wonderful use--the favorite use in the State of New York--WD-40 protects the Statue of Liberty from the elements. No wonder they have had 50 successful years!!!!!!
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On 12 Apr 2004 12:38:34 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comic (TOM KAN PA) wrote:

That article is woefully short on "facts"...
http://www.wd40.com/Brands/pdfs/msds-wd40_aerosol.us.pdf
Over 90% of the contents are listed as hazardous. Some ingredients are more hazardous than others, but there is PLENTY in WD-40 that can hurt you. Avoid ingestion, breathing of vapors, or prolonged contact with skin. It's also flammable.
Some of the "tips" are pretty bad ideas as well. Among others, it will damage some plastics and leather products, and it's definitely a major no-no to use it on guitar strings!
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<< it's definitely a major no-no to use it on guitar strings!>> ____Reply Separator_____ You got that right!! I more or less posted the article as an FYI to get comments.
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Name a specific ingredient that is harmful, other than aspirating hydrocarbons.
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Richard J Kinch wrote:

I thought the formula was a secret?
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WD40's specific recipe is a trade secret, however I gave a link that lists the prercentages of ingredients that are classified as hazardous. Read it yourself.
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Nonsense. The functional ingredients are no secret. The non-functional fragrance isn't disclosed, but so what.
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Leaving out aspirating hydrocarbons is like shooting yourself in the head with a pistol and saying "what's harmful except lead and copper?"
--

Christopher A. Young
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Stormin Mormon writes:

The same could be said of aspirating water. Lethal.
Can't we assume you're not going to put the liquid down your windpipe?
I repeat, what about this stuff is hazardous in normal uses? Nothing.
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How much WD40 can you drink in one sitting, Richard?
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People drink hydrocarbons all the time, sold as mineral oil laxatives at the pharmacy. Light hydrocarbons are an aspiration hazard, not an intestinal poison.
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How much WD40 can you drink at one time, Richard?
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From the warnings printed on a can of WD40:
Ingestion: CONTAINS PETROLEUM DISTILLATES (their caps) Harmful or fatal if swallowed. do not induce vomiting. Call physician immediately. Eye Contact: Immediately flush eyes with large amounts of water for 15 minutes. Skin Contact:Wash with soap and water.
They also point out that - INHALATION OF VAPOR OR SPRAY MIST MAY BE HARMFUL OR FATAL (their caps)
The original claim made here was that "there's nothing in a can of WD40 that can hurt you.
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Someone too weak to configure their news headers properly writes:

This standard warning for petroleum distillates is motivated by the aspiration hazards, NOT INTESTINAL TOXICITY.
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Rich kinch there isnt a dam thing in WD thats safe for you, its all oil by products , all poison in the proper dose, Read the warning label bozo. Or cant you seee the words "FATAL" relating to breathing or swallowing.
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One more time Richard... How much wd40 can you drink in one sitting? You are wrong, and too small to admit it. You have a history of being contrary for contray's sake. Grow up!
My headers are fine. Perhaps you've been aspirating toxins again.
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Your headers are flawed, so is your toxicological nonsense.
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Kinch the grinch you are a tard. What on the label of wd40 cant you understand , " inhalation of VAPOR or MIST may be HARMFULL or FATAL " Do you get it yet bozo.
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m Ransley writes:

Correct. The same may be said of water. Neither is toxic, although inhaling water, or WD-40, can kill you.
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Show me a warning for water Mr Butt Head Kinch the Grinch
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