Acrylic windows

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I currently have vinyl windows on my (Florida) porch. I've heard that the latest acrylic windows are pretty good and I was thinking about replacing the vinyl windows with them. Has anyone used the acrylic windows? If so, are they pretty scratch resistant? Would you use them again?
Thanks,
Jean
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Do you mean acrylic in place of glass? I wouldn't. There's glass windows that are 100 years old and still clear. Acrylic will never do that.
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On Tue, 15 Jun 2010 07:08:53 -0700 (PDT), jamesgangnc

impact better than glass.
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Jean wrote:

Windows made out of vinyl?
I have one acrylic window and several that are polycarbonate. I used them for impact resistance. Polycarbonate (Lexan is a brand) is much more impact resistant than acrylic. I believe polycarbonate is more scratch resistant - neither is particularly impressive. I don't believe either has a problem with becoming less clear with age. Polystyrene turns yellow with age - don't know if anyone made windows out of it.
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On 6/15/2010 11:59 AM, bud-- wrote:

Cannot tell if she is talking about glass or trim. For trim both would weather OK but acrylic glazing is better for impact resistance but will haze with age due to abrasion by particulate but this could be buffed out.
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For clarification: In the current windows in my Florida sun room, the transparent portion is made of clear thin vinyl (the material is kinda like heavy duty freezer baggies). What I'm interested in doing is changing the transparent part to hard acrylic. I am NOT interested in changing to glass windows.
Jean

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On 6/16/2010 9:40 AM, Jean wrote:

be much better. Light stability is good and it does not contain plasticizers as used in PVC which often bleed out. I would imagine light transmission is better with acrylic.
I glazed a basement window that kids had broken kicking ball with acrylic several years ago and it still looks fine.
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Jean wrote:

For clarification??? Freezer bags are made of low density polyethylene, not vinyl, which is far more permeable to moisture and causes frost build-up inside. I haven't seen vinyl used as window glazing except temporarily, such as for insulation (double glazing) during the winter. All glazing I've seen was made of glass, acrylic (Lucite), polycarbonate (Lexan), or polyester (translucent but not transparent; for fiberglass reinforced panels, such as used for skylights or solar heating collectors).
Polycarbonate isn't naturally sun resistant, and for car headlight lenses it's coated with an anti-UV glazing because ordinary polycarbonate will become translucent otherwise. Acrylic holds up great to sunlight (notice car tail light lenses don't deteriorate, unlike polycarbonate headlight lenses) but it will develop a yellow tint. Polycarbonate is stronger and sometimes used for bulletproof windows, but I don't know how scratch resistant it is, although regular polycarbonate, like the kind used for DVDs and CDs, doesn't polish nearly as well as acrylic does.
Normally, "vinyl windows" refers to windows made with vinyl frames, and the vinyl is treated to make is highly UV resistant, but if they're like vinyl gutters, you can't paint them any dark colors (dark means anything but white or yellow, and even light blue is dark for infrared purposes), or they may slightly melt or warp from sunlight in hot weather.
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On Thu, 17 Jun 2010 02:16:41 -0700 (PDT), "larry moe 'n curly"

wedgewood blue. No problems I've seen. It's not Florida, either, but in the summer we get a lot of strong sunlight and 90+ F days.

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wrote:

.....and that proves?

...and the OP could have referred to "vinyl glazed" windows and you would have understood it better?
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wrote:

The OP was just trying to give us a visual, but since you are so anal, maybe you should concentrate on what *you* write.

There is no such thing as bulletproof glass.The proper term is bullet- resistant glass.
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Ron wrote:

You're being trivial. Freezer bags aren't vinyl, and polyethylene is rarely used for glazing because it's not clear enough.

"...but since you are so anal, maybe you should concentrate on what *you* write."
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wrote:

Nice non-answer about "bulletproof" glass.
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wrote:

And you are being anal. The OP was trying to give us a *visual*.....would have been happier if the OP said, "the material is kinda like a clear shower curtain"?
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system glazed with soft vinyl (approx .030" thick). The glazing material is held in with a plastic spline, sort of like for a window screen.
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bud-- wrote the following:

It has to be. Eyeglass lenses are made of polycarbonate.

--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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willshak wrote:

Polycarbonate eyeglass lenses almost always have an anti-scratch coating applied to them. Without it, they scratch as easily as CDs and DVDs do, meaning much more easily than acrylic.
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On 6/15/2010 6:45 AM Jean spake thus:

Just curious why ordinary window glass won't do for you. Obviously there must be some reason. Hurricanes? wind-blown debris? birds?
--
The fashion in killing has an insouciant, flirty style this spring,
with the flaunting of well-defined muscle, wrapped in flags.
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Let me restate the situation:
The window panes in my Florida sun room (i.e., basically just a covered screened porch) are made of an optically clear vinyl -like heavy duty freezer baggies. I'm thinking about changing the panes to hard acrylic (or Lexan).
Glass is not an acceptable alternative - I'd have to get a permit and bring the room up to local housing code (possibly install footers, possibly install additional roof supports, add insulation, install electrical outlets, etc.). The cost of all that is considerable and my property taxes would increase.
So, does anyone have any experience with acrylic windows? Are they fairly scratch resistant?
Jean
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Jean: I'm not sure what your concern is for your existing vinyl. If a panel is damaged it can be replaced easily (you will need the glazing and some spline and a sharp knife and a spline roller). Those windows are quite durable but they ARE a little short of optical quality. An unbendable sheet of acrylic is going to require some different method of attachment than the rolled-in vinyl you have now.
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