acrylic vs cast iron bath tub

we are planning to remodel one of our bathrooms which is used primarily by our daughter ans is also used as the "guest" bathroom. the plans call for replacing a cast iron bathtub. are there any benefits or drawbacks in using acrylic versus cast iron when we replace this tub? she takes showers exclusively, however this is the only "full" bathroom in the house. thanks for any/all advise & recommendations.
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If you are talking acrylic tub / shower unit v. cast iron tub + tile surround, I'd go for a quality acrylic unit. We installed a Kohler unit in 1978 / 79 and they look like new, are easy to clean, have no joints to leak water.
TB
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pat wrote:

Costwise the acrylic will be far cheaper by the time you retile. I am with Bellsouth. One piece shower tub, no seams to leak or collect crud. Wife wanted a glass shower door but I convinced her to use a curtain. Keeping a glass shower door clean is a constant hassle vice throwing the curtain in the wash.
Harry K
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On Thu 05 May 2005 07:59:42a, Harry K wrote in alt.home.repair:

I'd be sorely discouraged of taking showers if I didn't have a glass shower door. Shower curtains are a royal PITA to take a shower withi.
--
Wayne Boatwright **
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It is really hard to move around a cast iron tub in an existing structure.
The only disadvantage that I can think of to the acrylic is that cigarette butts will burn it if left laying on the tub rim. That is the only damage tenants have managed to do them over a period of about 20 years.
Colbyt
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I know the cost of a ceramic tub is a lot more than for an acrylic tub but the reason is that the ceramic tub lasts a lot longer and is easier to take care of than the other one. My ceramic tub in my old house still looked like new after almost 25 years. The acrylic tub has had to be refinished after 15 - and no one ever used it for anything but showers.

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Hmm.... I put cast iron tubs in my house (Kohler Villager, at $249 each), and the cost is about the same as acrylic.... Advantages of cast: --lasts almost forever (don't drop a hammer in one) -- holds the heat a LOT longer (that is, if the person knows how do to it right, that is put in the hottest water, and wait a few mins for the iron to bring the temp down to a non scorching temp ;-) -- no flexing -- no scratching -- quieter, in surrounding rooms
disadvantage: -- heavy to install -- needs a decent surround, like tile, though there are acrylic surrounds
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I have used a number of cast iron tubs and several fiberglass ones. The fiberglass keeps the water warm a LOT longer.
On 6 May 2005 14:29:43 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

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Thus my specific comment "that is, if the person knows how do to it right"
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It was noted by a poster in recent months, that removing a cast iron tub can be quite difficult. Therefore it might be recommended to go with Acrylic.
I can vouch for Cast Iron being a far more durable product in my lifes experience though, and would recommend cast iron. Friendly to all types of cleaners, and looks nice as long as it's cared for. Pretty much several generations of usage without damage to the coating.
Both have their drawbacks, both have their advantages.
Cats iron (usually coated with porcelain ) will chip if something heavy/sharp is dropped in it. Next to unrepairable without visual reminder, and many times will rust out due to exposed metal. However it can be done by spending a great deal of cash to have it done. Damage is far more difficult to this product.
Drop the same item in an Acrylic tub, and you may not be able to bathe *that day* without pouring water through the bottom of the tub and destroying home structure. Repairs would be made with fiberglass/acrylic repair materials, and look like hell also. (keep in mind, this is only one persons experience) If an acrylic tub is cared for , thay do look nice and last a long time. juts nowhere near as long as a cast iron one. And..........You must be carefull what cleaners you use ojn an acrylic tub. Some cleaners will eat the surface (shine) off the tube and make it next to ugly.
See, both Suck.........LOL
Either way, it's truely about whether you like the "feel" of which, and what kind of money you'd like to spend.
Like I have said (this for the third time) this is only my experience. The products built today may not be as good when buying a cast iron model, as they were in the past, and the Acrylic tubs may be far superior to what I have dealt with even lately.
Good luck.

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MUADIB
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They break apart with a sledge hammer. I won't say easy, cause it wasn't me that did it. Be careful the broken edges are very sharp, as are the shards of porcelain, leather gloves are a must. Two man job.
If your redoing the walls at the same time, it is easier, since you've now got that extra inch of clearance. Then slap backer board on the walls, and tile away. Rock solid.
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