ACQ lumber experience

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wrote:

Well- maybe not bans. I thought it was banned in NY but it can still be used on railroad ties and utility poles- http://www.state.ny.us/governor/press/0726072.html
Jim
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wrote:

In SW Florida utility poles are CCA treated .... still. Don't let your kids lick them! If everyone followed that advice we wouldn't be having this ACQ question.
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Hey Bill-- it is 2008 where I am. [for a bit]
On Tue, 30 Dec 2008 20:21:03 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:
Agent must read something differently than T-bird does. I just hit reply and it reads as 2008 here.
Jim
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Thanks for the info. I have some PT wood left over from a fence job that I have on my patio.
I will move them since they may be a "termite attractant."
Andy
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On Mon 29 Dec 2008 04:37:30a, WhiteTea told us...

That seems odd. Are there different types of pressure treated wood? Some years ago we had a raised bed built surrounding a patio using pressure treated 6x6's laid directly on the ground, stacked to create the depth, then filled with soil and planted. In 8 years of living there we never had any deterioration. The only change was a darkening of the wood.
--
Wayne Boatwright
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On Mon, 29 Dec 2008 11:45:38 GMT, Wayne Boatwright
-snip-

Sure are. Even 20 yrs ago there was 'ok' PT and 'PT that wouldn't die'. I don't remember the spec differences, but I remmeber checking labels.
I don't remember when the new style PT started- 6-8yrs ago?- but it is apparently inferior to all the old stuff. [unless your goal is to eat hardware, which the new stuff does]
Jim
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wrote:

There was CCA Copper Chromium Arsenic, the new stuff eats metal fasteners except stainless and certain galvanised,
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Wayne Boatwright wrote:

Sure. Some PT is rated for above ground, some for ground contact, some for direct burial. It depends on the amount of goop injected...more goop = more restance + higher price. The wood should be stamped or have a tag telling the percentage. The normal Home Depot type is as low a percentage as it gets.
--

dadiOH
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On Mon 29 Dec 2008 01:49:54p, dadiOH told us...

That would explain it. We bought ours from a lumber yard and told them that the bottom row of 6x6's would be partially imbedded in soil. They obviously put us onto the right product.
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Wayne Boatwright
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There are different grades of wood, maybe it was not treated right, you have the lablel warranty and reciept? Your city architect or engineer, free to talk to, may know if better quality is out there that they use.
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wrote:

Treated lumber should last 10 years or more. I wonder if the planks purchased "missed" the proper treatment.
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Phisherman wrote:

You are thinking of the old CCA treated lumber which did and still does last for years. The new ACQ treated lumber is still in the trial stages.
I wish that I had bought a bunch of the old stuff, and still may if I can find some somewhere.
--
Robert Allison
Rimshot, Inc.
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one day guys in moon suits will be busy nationwide removing treated wood, it will be asbestos crews, after they run out of asbestos to remove
just a matter of time
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I wonder who's definition of "proper" treatment the manufacturer goes by? Now days it is common for pressure treatment to pressure the chemicals some depth into the surface, but not necessarily to the center. Then the wood commonly develops cracks. If the crack extends beyond the treated depth, there is nothing to prevent termites & moisture/rot from getting to the untreated portion of the wood and hollowing it out. I believe that is what caused the problem I experienced. Bad thing is that there is no way of telling how "properly" the lumber is treated without cutting off a portion of it.
Red
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wrote:

It is measured by the pounds per cu/ft of injected material. I am not sure what is "good" with ACQ but I wouldn't use anything less than .40 CCA for much of anything and when you are in salt water 2.5 is a better number.
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