Acid for drain cleaning?

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If your hardware store has more than one type of acidic drain cleaner, it should be able to explain the difference. Muriatic acid (dilute hydrochloric acid) seems to be the most common. You may wish also to consider whether the drain pipes are metal or plastic or ceramic (each of which responds differently to various acids, resisting some but not others.)
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Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
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On 8/6/2012 9:22 AM, Don Phillipson wrote:

Hydrochloric is easily available for uses like etching concrete.
Every acid drain cleaner I have seen is sulfuric acid. Sulfuric acid attacks organic materials.
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Back in the late 60's I dropped acid a few times. It was a decent trip, but after seeing some friends get busted by the cops for the stuff, I quit taking it. It's some pretty groovy stuff and the best acid is really far out, but it's still illegal and you could go to prison for possession. If you have any, toss it in the garbage before the pigs come. They'll be oinking outside your door before you know it. If you wanna get buzzed, just smoke pot and drink beer. It's much safer and legal in most places.
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On Sunday, August 5, 2012 10:50:12 AM UTC-4, TomR wrote:

I agree wiht the poster about using a snake. I noticed some of the chemical drain cleaners now also come with a short plastic snake. I think that probably does more for the clog than the chemicals. On a system without age related or chronic problems clogs are almost always at or near the fixture drain. The pipes just get bigger as you move further away from the fixture.
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On 8/5/2012 10:50 AM, TomR wrote:

Here is my personal theory: in a bathroom drain, it isn't likely kitchen grease. For kitchen grease, a pot of boiling water with some added Dawn poured slowly into the drain. If kitchen slime, hot water followed by bleach; let sit. In bathroom, both drains at one time suggest downline problem or problem with vent. If it is neither of those, it is likely hair. Damn hard to dissolve hair globs, even with acid. Snake (or coat hanger with a hook end) to try to clear hair globs. If that doesn't work, try longer snake. If that doesn't work, have a pro check out the sewer line.
At one house of mine, I called the plumber when tub drain got too slow. He snaked it, pulled out a smallish clump of hair. He also identified the hair as belonging to two different people, which was correct :o) At another house, the shower drain got very slow very suddenly. I took of the drain cover, reched in with my trusty coat hanger and the coat hanger went straight down into some mush. Scared me, but I probed a little more and pulled out the nastiest, biggest clump of hair imagineable. Yuck!!
Have had drains slow badly after feeding large helping of potato peels through disposal; bad idea. At condo, two toilets backed up withing minutes of each other; obviously, a problem downline. Turned out the line to the sewer was half rusted away along it's bottom.
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