AC question

Do you think replacing a 1991 AC would be a wise move? It's a Rheem can't read the label to well but I'll bet it wasn't top of the line.
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If it works fine and you have no problems, why would you want to change it? Wait till it dies, then get a new high efficiency model. I have a Carrier unit made in 1986. It still works well, cools the house with no problems.
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graced this newsgroup with:

It's very expensive to change it out and it'll take time to realize any savings from the more efficient a/c. We *had* to replace our because it died on us and the cost to replace the (mid-70's) parts nearly cost as much as just getting a more efficient system outright.
Having said that, if the seer rating is very low then it's something to consider.
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Sacramento Dave wrote:

A 16 year old AC probably has a relatively low EER by today's standards. If you find a replacement unit rated at 14 or so, I'd go for it, considering how much energy costs are rising. This is a good time to shop for a better AC before the summer frenzy commences and stocks are still good in the stores. HTH
Joe
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A big factor is my wife works a major manufacturer witch gets us an incredible discount. The unite seems to be pretty wimpy, about 2 years the compressor died we had a home warranty cost us $150 to replace the biggest annoyance is it's so loud when it kicks in. I did remove the cover cleaned all the coils some were pretty bad look like dog hair, but it still seem very inefficient
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IF you have the means ( having a major discount helps too) then I would replace while you have the means. I worked part time at a Sears and replaced all my vehicles tires and fridge, then quit! With the emp discount + emp night + sale + coupons = 40% discount!
Why wait till it dies and its 100+ out and your paying full retail! That's not FUN
Searcher
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Take into consideration that this may be the last year of any Fed tax rebates and SMUD is offering up to 500.
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Joe writes:

Bunk. Efficiency became an issue in the 1970s after the energy crisis and monetary inflation. Efficiency improvments were mostly in place during the 1980s. Improvements in true efficiency since the 1990s have been minimal.
Thermodynamics is a dismal science, and the law of diminishing returns applies to efficiency improvements. The low fruit has been picked for decades.
Now, the AC salesman will tell you that anything you *have* is woefully out of date and inefficient and you will just *make money* by spending $$$$'s on his new system. But he won't actually write down any promise of savings, he will only puff.
Ask the salesman of the "more efficient" system for an actual efficiency promise in terms of dollars, amperage, temp differential, air flow, or other quantitative performance measure. Not some cooked-up government SEER number that is literallyl *impossible* to verify in the field, but actual measurable numbers. Tell him you're ready to buy but you won't pay until the system is installed and the measured performance meets the promise. See how his puffery is deflated.
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Richard J Kinch wrote:

Richard Kinch, you hit the nail on the head. What is his location and runtime per season? Southern Florida 2200-hours, upper states 400 to 600-hours of runtime per AC season. In upper states, do what will save money in Particular on Heating costs.
There are numerous things that can be done to reduce AC & heating energy use costs other than going to a higher SEER. I want AC Contractors & consumers' to think about all the cost effective possibilities and list them. SEER is only one factor among dozens of factors when considering reducing AC operating costs! http://www.udarrell.com/proper_cfm_btuh_duct_sizing_air_conditioning_systems.html
Then Click the Anchor named below, then the click the PDF Link allow plenty of time for it to load - "Basic AC Overview - Specifications VS. Reality <#Below_is_an_outstanding_PDF>" <#Below_is_an_outstanding_PDF> - udarrell
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WISDOM PRINCIPLE DIRECTED EMPOWERMENT COMMUNICATIONS -
THE REAL POLITICAL ISSUES and WISDOM BASED PEOPLE EMPOWERMENT
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I've seen EERs or SEERs in the 20s, like the very expensive Mitsubishi mini-splits, w/ inverter technology--essentially variable speed compressors. Bull?
How would someone actually measure and EER in the field? An amprobe and a thermometer? And then mass-flow, no? Not so easy.
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Mr. P.V.\'d (formerly Droll Troll), Yonkers, NY
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Measure temperature and humidity of air in vs out, and air flow. Calculate actual heat pumped per hour from consequent latent and sensible heats. Meter power at panel to get actual energy used per hour. Divide to get heat per energy, which is efficiency.
Or estimate refrigerant mass flow from compressor pressure differential, displacement, and volumetric efficiency, to get heat pumped per hour, given no gas out or liquid in.
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On Mon, 11 Jun 2007 18:27:05 -0700, Sacramento Dave wrote:

Yes.
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If it's still running, a professional cleaning would help save energy. The tech should take the cover off the outside unit and spray it with cleaning chemicals. Wait several minutes, and rinse with a water hose. Might take two or three washings.
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Christopher A. Young
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On Jun 12, 8:51 am, "Stormin Mormon"

I have a 1984 unit here in NJ that's still running and I have no plans to replace it. Does that answer your question? A lot depends on your situation. At one extreme, you live in Phoenix, have an elderly parent that can't stand the heat, and work out of a home office. At another, you live alone in Sacramento and can easily make it through most of a season without air, should you not get a good price if it blows.
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Some other factors Will get the unite at cost and I mean cost, Will pay one of the installers to install it ( cash) I have cleaned the coils that seems to have helped a little. I will wait until after summer. also one of the AC guys is going to come out and evaluate are AC seeing how my wife works there I guess he'll be pretty honest. I'm really don't want to spend the money but the system now seems weak ( it has a new compressor) So if the house will cool down better and will save on my energy cost ( PG&E pay on a average just about $600 a month) then it's worth it.
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You really think you're going to get a unit "at cost"? Does that mean stolen, and then sold for cash?
You're going to get a backdoor deal from a hack who works for cash while probably screwing his boss out of truck time and labor? Why am I not all warm and fuzzy?
Is it just me, or do many "pretty honest" people go behind the boss's back to do cash jobs? I've never met one.
Damn, boy, I think you're so cheap you're setting yourself up for a major fall.
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