AC leaks air at valve in attic

I doubt this is normal. When I'm in the attic the cold pipe just above the drip pan really blows a lot of cold air out at me. I've called a repairman but he can't get here for a couple of days. Anyway, I'm wondering - assuming this cold air shouldn't be leaking out like this - would it maybe just involve refitting the pipe/valve or could it be something worse?
We called for a repairman last week because our unit was just not cooling our house but then tonight we found our carpet was wet behind the wall where the AC unit sits in the attic. When I went to see what was going on I saw that the pan was full of water but was not flowing out of the emergency drain but once I cleared that drain the pan emptied fine. I know having water in the pan is normal and that it is supposed to evaperate before it overflows but I haven't run across any thing that might help me figure out why it's not evaperating. The low (normal) condensation drain is working fine. Could it be the leaking of cold air is hampering the evaperation? Any thoughts, ideas or suggestions would be greatly appreciate.
TIA.
JB
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ITs called UL181 A-B tape.

And you cleaned the primary drain too right?

Wrong.
Its not supposed to evaporate, its all supposed to go outthe primary drain to the outside. if the secondary, emergency pan is filling, you have issues that your AC tech can look over, and tell you exacty what is wrong.

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In alt.home.repair on 18 Jul 2005 23:05:22 -0700 snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com posted:

Are you sure you're not confusing air conditioners with refrigerators?

Meirman -- If emailing, please let me know whether or not you are posting the same letter. Change domain to erols.com, if necessary.
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I doubt this is normal. When I'm in the attic the cold pipe just above the drip pan really blows a lot of cold air out at me. CY: Right, not normal.
I've called a repairman but he can't get here for a couple of days. Anyway, I'm wondering - assuming this cold air shouldn't be leaking out like this - would it maybe just involve refitting the pipe/valve or could it be something worse? CY: Probably needs some kind of patch over the hole. Duct tape, or possibly some sheet metal. I'm not there to see it, so can't be totally sure.
We called for a repairman last week because our unit was just not cooling our house but then tonight we found our carpet was wet behind the wall where the AC unit sits in the attic. When I went to see what was going on I saw that the pan was full of water but was not flowing out of the emergency drain but once I cleared that drain the pan emptied fine. I know having water in the pan is normal and that it is supposed to evaperate before it overflows CY: Actually, the humidity in the home is supposed to condense on the indoor coil. The water then runs into the pan, and drains through a drain. On a central AC system, the water should not reevaporate.
but I haven't run across any thing that might help me figure out why it's not evaperating. The low (normal) condensation drain is working fine. CY: As it should be.
Could it be the leaking of cold air is hampering the evaperation? Any thoughts, ideas or suggestions would be greatly appreciate. CY: I doubt the problems are related.
TIA. CY: YWATA.
JB CY
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Try this link,
Solve Condensate drain problems
http://www.contractingbusiness.com/Classes/ArticleDraw/ArticleDraw.aspx?CIDS49&HBC=GlobalSearch&OAS=&NIL úlse
Stretch
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