AC causing PV inverter to cycle into wait mode

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old dirtbeard wrote:
...

http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/wwg/productIndex.shtml?originalValue=simpson&L2=Multimeters&operator=mfgRefinementSearch&L1=Simpson+Electric
Wow. The price performance is worse than I thought. For $40 you can get a cheap BK Precision 2703B digital meter with an AC accuracy of 1.5% of reading + 4 (least significant) digits. That would be 4V for a 240V reading or 4.4V for a 268V reading. And you don't have parallax issues adding to your error like you do with an analog meter.
DC accuracy for the BK meter is .5% of reading + 1 (LS) digit.
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M Q,
For what it is worth, Simpson is owned by a native American tribe and has a pretty interesting history:
http://www.simpsonelectric.com/main/index.asp?p «out_Simpson_Electric&s=History
best,
doug
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On 9/3/2007 10:05 PM, M Q wrote:

inaccuracy is at full scale (either way - 0 or 500). I would think a 260 would give very accurate readings measuring 240VAC and 268VAC on the 500VAC scale, approaching the accuracy of a DVM.
I used a Triplett 310 for decades before moving to Fluke DVMs. The early DVMs were a bear to use on AC - most measured in peak to peak voltages and you had to do your own calculations for RMS. Now I don't think I could live without my Fluke 77.
Just my 2/100$.
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Ted
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xPosTech wrote:

Even if the analog meter was exactly accurate, you would loose a percent or so in readability due to paralax between the needle and the scale unless the scale has a mirror (as some do).

The Fluke 77 actually doesn't measure true RMS. Most meters (analog or digital) do not. They just measure the P-P voltage and scale the reading as if it were a sin wave. I have used a number of analog meters over the decades. I now have a Fluke 75 and Fluke 87 III (true RMS) and would never want to go back to analog meters. If you are measuring a true sin wave, true RMS meters tend to be slightly less accurate.

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I think all good analog meters (all Simpson's anyway) have mirrored scales, so parallax really is not an issue. I always do mid-scale readings on the 260.
Using an analog meter probably takes a little more skill and time to be as accurate, though. It is pretty hard to misread a DMM. If I were making my living with a meter in my hand and time was money, I would use a DMM.
As someone who occasionally needs to use a meter, and someone who appreciates Starrett mics, S-K wrenches, Klein hand tools, etc., I truly appreciate a quality, hand crafted tool. There is just something special about the experience of using a quality analog VOM compared to reading a digital display. Sort of like watching a movie or reading the book. The book takes more time, but it is far more engaging. :)
Won't argue, though, DMM's are cheaper and faster...but sometimes that really does not matter.
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Doug,
I've seen several posts in this thread where the possibility of reducing the "dropout" voltage of the inverter is mentioned.
But... what about reducing the amount of *time* the inverter is offline? Surely it isn't necessary for the unit to decouple for 5-10 minutes just due to a 250 mS droop from a motor starting?
I really think you need to contact the dealer or manufacturer of the inverter. I can't imagine they've never seen this problem before!
Eric Law

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