Abusive padlock tests

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Frickin' hot in Vegas right now, and we have to go there this afternoon. But, hey, for around $80 an hour, I just suck it up. I also carry cotton welding caps that I douse in ice water, and cotton Hawaiian print shirts that I dunk in the pool. Stays wet for about an hour. A real shock to the system when you first put the shirt on. Like someone hitting you with a blast of ice water. Works pretty good, though. I have used the wet welder's hat for a long time.
Steve
visit my blog at http://cabgbypasssurgery.com watch for the book
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wrote:

Read it again.
A baseball bat is a deadly weapon if you use it as a weapon or threaten someone with it. A screw driver is a burglar toll in some contexts and situations.
Intent (or use) is everything.
Dentists have drawers full of lock picking tools.
My garden shed is full of deadly weapons.
The tire iron in my car? Depends on whether I use it to change a tire or whack somebody with it.
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snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

Correct.
No he doesn't. He has a drawer full of medical instruments.

Probably not (I don't know what you have in your garden shed). You probably have a shed full of tools.

Yes, but....
A truncheon is a deadly weapon per se - a baseball bat is not. A Bowie Knife is a deadly weapon in and of itself without regard to its use - a carving knife is not. A three-foot length of 3/4" wire rope is not a deadly weapon, until you wrap one end with friction tape.
In these cases, the intent of the manufacturer (or modifier) determines the classification. When you USE a tire iron to beat someone it BECOMES a deadly weapon. A pair of brass knuckels is ALWAYS a deadly weapon.
It's a small, but crucial, difference. It is against the law in most jurisdictions to carry a night stick or truncheon in your car or on your person. Carrying a pony-league baseball bat is always legal.
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wrote:

The tools used for lock picking have legitimate uses and are not automatically "burglar tools"
Same as a screw driver or crowbar.
In fact, a "slim Jim" used for poping door locks is not automatically a burglar tool either.
Brass knuckles are defined as a weapon by laws.
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On Thu, 08 Jul 2010 15:59:19 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

I can drive from one jurisdiction to another jurisdiction (Las Vegas to North Las Vegas), a crowbar in NLV might be called "burglar tools", but in LV it is a tool. The police can size people up pretty fast, in the darkness of night.
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wrote:

We are in full view of management, and there is no intent to commit burglary. We are simply gaining access at the direction and/or under the supervision of management. We are on property by order of the owners as a legal agent or assign, therefore there is no trespass. I'd be within the law, even in Florida. It would seem that by that writing, anyone could possess these tools if they had no intent. It's like the Vermont concealed carry law. No permit is necessary if the concealed firearm is carried with no intent to use it to commit a crime.
Steve
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wrote:

Have you checked your local laws? Here in Florida, regardless of permission or even if you're opening your own house, possession of lock picks is illegal unless you're actually a locksmith... (I don't remember the exact language, but it's pretty restrictive.)
reply: I only stated that we had legal permission of the owners and management companies to open locked areas, and that would include using bolt cutters or a prybar. Yes, they are illegal to possess. I have LEO experience, and family on the force there. I also have a license plate ring that identifies me subtly as a family member of the force there. I have my old ID. The picklocks are always hidden, and for any officer to be able to find them, they would have to be on a search for something else to toss the entire car. I am a well behaved citizen and that isn't going to happen.
I fail to see that if you are on your own property that there can be a problem about opening a door. But then The Republik of Kalifornia has strange laws, and perhaps Florida does too.
Steve
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