About to buy home with oil tank + gas lines; trying to navigate options??

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???
I'm not the one who posted the nonsense that oil was somehow "dirty" compared to gas. That person has still not posted any evidence or cites to support that lie whatsoever.
You are correct that anyone can assert something crazy and then demand that everybody scrable to disprove it. That's exactly what David Nebenzahl and a few others have done.
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On Mon, 19 May 2008 13:22:38 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

Maybe I can help out...
Table 2. Pounds of Air Pollutants Produced per Billion Btu of Energy
Pollutant        Natural Gas    Oil        Coal
Carbon Dioxide        117,000        164,000     208,000 Carbon Monoxide    40        33        208 Nitrogen Oxides        92        448        457 Sulfur Dioxide        0.6        1,122        2,591 Particulates        7.0        84        2,744 Formaldehyde        0.750        0.220        0.221 Mercury            0.000        0.007        0.016
Source: http://tonto.eia.doe.gov/FTPROOT/natgas/056098.pdf
If you want the complete picture from wellhead to burner tip, see pages 49 through 71 of the above DOE report.
A couple notable quotes:
"Natural gas is less chemically complex than other fuels, has fewer impurities, and its combustion accordingly results in less pollution."
"The combustion of natural gas also produces significantly lower quantities of other undesirable compounds, particularly toxics, than those produced from combustion of petroleum products or coal."
"Natural gas is not a significant contributor to acid rain formation."
"Natural gas use also is not much of a factor in smog formation. As opposed to petroleum products and coal, the combustion of natural gas results in relatively small production of smog-forming pollutants."
Cheers, Paul
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wrote in message

installed whether they are in use or not. Some jurisdictions demand the removal of tanks that reach a certain age.....found this out when looking for a house. The rational for this was that even "empty" tanks have some oil in the bottom and eventually the tank would leak and cause an environmental hazard.
--
Ron P

If we are what we eat then: I\'m fast,
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On Tue, 20 May 2008 09:22:32 -0400, "Worn Out Retread"

Having an old tank removed from a basement is not very expensive. If it has oil in it, the oil and scrap value of the tank may be worth enough to cover the cost.
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On 5/20/2008 7:02 AM snipped-for-privacy@dog.com spake thus:

The scrap value of the tank I can see, but are you saying they can salvage the oil? What do they do with it? Presumably, it wouldn't be considered fit for burning, would it? (At least I wouldn't want it going into my burner, after sitting there for gawd only knows how many years.)
--
The best argument against democracy is a five-minute
conversation with the average voter.
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On Tue, 20 May 2008 10:35:27 -0700, David Nebenzahl

Oil companies do this all the time. I don't know, but I "guess" they run it through some rudimentay filtering to remove sediment. I know that when they replace a tank, they temporarily pump the old tank's contents out, and then put it back into the new tank, so they must have this worked out.
I know a guy who used to own a diesel Mercedes. When anyone he know was selling a house, converting to gas, or otherwise having unwanted oil, he would buy it from them for pennies on the dollar, and pump it into jerry cans, and his car's tank to transfer it home. It would sometimes take him many trips at 30-40 or so gallons per. He had a portable electric pump for the purpose. He had a couple of old tanks in his barn for storage of his treasure. It wasn't legal or dyed, but it seemed to work just fine in his car.
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out of the house.....our estimate when we contemplated such a thing was several hundred dollars. Luckily, we had a friend qualified to do such work.
--
Ron P

If we are what we eat then: I\'m fast,
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On Wed, 21 May 2008 09:08:39 -0400, "Worn Out Retread"

I can't imagine that cutting a tank up with a sawsall would take very long. My house does not have an outside access to the basement, but by taking off the railing on the basement stairs, it can easily go up the stairs and out through the kitchen in one piece.
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That was not possible in my house and the working space was limited.
--
Ron P

If we are what we eat then: I\'m fast,
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On May 19, 6:13am, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

I inspect a lot of chimneys and those with the most damage are the ones with oil fired heat. The roofs are usually dirty and the terra cotta is often crumbling on the inside. Much less so with gas boilers. Oil fired boilers have made local chimney sweeps and metal liner industry guys rich.
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