About the new energy-saving light bulbs

Page 2 of 2  

On 26 Apr 2007 08:27:25 -0700, intrepid snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Here are the instructions for the safe clean-up and disposal of broken fluorescent lamps, as provided by the U.S. DOE, NEMA, GE and Clean Nova Scotia:
"Because there is such a small amount of mercury in CFLs, your greatest risk if a bulb breaks is getting cut from glass shards. Research indicates that there is no immediate health risk to you or your family should a bulb break and it’s cleaned up properly. You can minimize any risks by following these proper clean-up and disposal guidelines:
* Sweep up - don’t vacuum - all of the glass fragments and fine particles.
* Place broken pieces in a sealed plastic bag and wipe the area with a damp paper towel to pick up any stray shards of glass or fine particles. Put the used towel in the plastic bag as well.
* If weather permits, open windows to allow the room to ventilate.
Source: http://www.energystar.gov/ia/partners/promotions/change_light/downloads/Fact_Sheet_Mercury.pdf
"Safe cleanup precautions: If a CFL breaks in your home, open nearby windows to disperse any vapor that may escape, carefully sweep up the fragments (do not use your hands) and wipe the area with a disposable paper towel to remove all glass fragments. Do not use a vacuum. Place all fragments in a sealed plastic bag and follow disposal instructions above."
Source: http://www.nema.org/lamprecycle/epafactsheet-cfl.pdf
"Fluorescent lamps contain mercury. Mercury at atmospheric pressure is a silver colored liquid that tends to form balls. Mercury is a hazardous substance. When one lamp is broken, the best thing to do is to wear chemical resistant glove to clean it up. The gloves can be vinyl, rubber, PVC, or neoprene. The gloves you buy in the supermarket for household cleaning are sufficient. The gloves protect your skin from absorbing mercury and from getting cut by the glass. The remains of one lamp can be disposed as normal waste since the amount of mercury is small. However, for future reference, when large quantities of lamps are being disposed you must follow your state and the federal regulation for disposing of mercury-containing lamps."
Source: http://www.gelighting.com/na/business_lighting/faqs/cfl.htm#6
"In the unlikely event your bulb breaks, be certain to sweep up - don't vacuum - all of the glass fragments and phosphor powder. Place the broken pieces in a plastic bag and wipe the area with a damp paper towel to pick up any stray shards of glass or fine particles. Put the used towel in the plastic bag as well. Like paint, batteries, thermostats and other hazardous household items, CFLs should be disposed of properly. Check with your municipal waste management program for proper disposal. If none exist, place in regular waste container. It is good practice to always clean up any products containing mercury with care and common sense."
Source: http://www.clean.ns.ca/images/Documents/CFL%20bulb%20fact%20sheet.pdf
Cheers, Paul
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 26 Apr 2007 08:27:25 -0700, intrepid snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Hysteria. THe homeowner decided there should be a problem, and kept trying until she managed to create one.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

1. The phosphor in "regular" fluorescents has changed. It was something really nasty way back when, maybe the 1950's. But at since at least the 1970's they used something else known as halophosphate for the "old tech" (my words) phosphor.
2. CFLs (with few exceptions that include most dollar store ones) contain something even different, known as triphosphor, and as I understand it that was first used in the 1970's with halophosphate being in wide use by then.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
intrepid snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

The powder is not mercury. The mercury is something else, in quantities small enough for disposal by homeowners into regular household trash to be perfectly legal in most jurisdictions. (However, using info from www.lamprecycle.org is preferred.)
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 26 Apr 2007 02:24:02 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@manx.misty.com (Don Klipstein) wrote:

Bottom line, when they break, toss them in the trash and wash your hands.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

And why is that? If the desk lamp is shielded so you're not exposed to the brightness of the bulb itself, then there shouldn't be a glare problem. Newer CFLs don't flicker by design so the only thing left is color. Choose a warm color CFL bulb that matches incandescent if you prefer.
There are some junk CFLs in the market. Buy CFLs that have the "Energy Star" label to avoid short life, poor color and low output problems. Energy Star bulbs are tested and guaranteed. Save the packaging and let Energy Star know if you're not happy with the performance.
All of the CFLs that I installed in a new house 4 years ago are still burning just fine.
TKM
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Well, for openers, they emit UV which is VERY harmful to eyes, especially if the source is as close as a desk lamp.
CWM
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 25 Apr 2007 01:06:24 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@manx.misty.com (Don Klipstein) wrote:

Perhaps, but with a desk lamp, the source is inches away from your very vulnerable eyes. If you wreck your eyes, you can't replace them.
CWM
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 25 Apr 2007 01:02:55 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@manx.misty.com (Don Klipstein) wrote:

[...]
Thanks a bunch for pointing to this rating comparison. Very useful. I will replace some of my dim-bulb <g> cheapies with good bulbs.
Aspasia
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Yes, because it's not a 100-watt bulb. It's a 24-watt bulb.

Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I was hoping it was that simple!
--

8^)~ Sue (remove the x to email)
~~~~
I reserve the absolute right to be smarter today than I was
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

of light (lumens) as a 100 watt incandescent bulb. Go by the wattage of the bulb-- MLD
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

think the fixture recommendations are based on how much heat they can tolerate and normal incandescent bulbs put out more heat than light. Cfl's put more of the energy into light. You should base replacement on lumens or light equivalent. Since cfl's take a while longer to fire up, I think my wife bears through it to get more light. Only had a couple of cfl's that emitted an annoying spectrum and these ended up on the front porch. Their light is harsh. Otherwise, I've had no problems and they have been long life. Frank
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Frank wrote:

--
WISDOM PRINCIPLE DIRECTED EMPOWERMENT COMMUNICATIONS -
THE REAL POLITICAL ISSUES and WISDOM BASED PEOPLE EMPOWERMENT
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

http://www.suzanne-eckhardt.com/http://www.intergnat.com/malebashing/http://www.intergnat.cexom/pussygames / Not to bash anyone, but can you say "fluorescent" light? Dictionary will confirm.
Meanwhile, if you DAGS on, say, cfl you'll get multi-mega-hits. Just ignore the "Canadial Football League" ones, or exclude such in "advanced query."
Boosts s/n ratio.
J
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@sme-online.com wrote:

My spellchecker told me that was wrong. I believed it.

--

8^)~ Sue (remove the x to email)
~~~~
I reserve the absolute right to be smarter today than I was
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Sure you can, if the bulb will fit. cfls are quite a bit longer than incandescents, and successively higher wattage bulbs are also successively longer bulbs.
That's my only real complaint about the cfls. We have a lot of sconce-type fixtures here, and even the lower wattage bulbs stick out all over the place. It's not a nice effect, but I use cfls wherever possible, and have only had one blow prematurely. That's in a closed fixture, and it didn't burn out as prematurely as the incandescents that preceeded it.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.