? about replacing underlayment


Situation: Kitchen floor, linoleum tile over particle board--bad choice!--why? because the leaky water heater (since replaced) caused the underlayment to buckle, and it now needs to be removed.
Problem: Underlayment apparently runs under the sink counter.
Question: What tool would one use to cut the underlayment around the bottom of the counter? There's an overhang over the front. I'm guessing some kind of "zero clearance" saw, but am not familiar with these.
What would a pro do?
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David Nebenzahl wrote:

Pull that section of base cabinets, and fix it correctly. If the particle board underlayment (standard in kitchens for many years) was buckled, the plywood subfloor may have problems too. Can you see it from the bottom, to poke with an icepick and look for mushy areas? The water didn't stop at the toe kick, it ran under the cabinets as well, and it stayed wet there longer. If the cabinets are chipboard, the bottom edges are likely mushy as well.
-- aem sends...
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On 8/16/2008 4:51 PM aemeijers spake thus:

Thanks for your reply. However, don't think that's going to happen, since counter contains a plumbed-in sink, client doesn't have a ton of money and doesn't want kitchen torn up forever.
Under the particle board are floorboards (solid fir or pine) which are not damaged. The cabinets themselves seem fine as well. If the particle board under the cabinet got wet, it's no big deal.
He's getting a couple estimates from floor-intallation places. It'll be interesting to see what they recommend here.
I'd be inclined to cut around the cabinets, if such a tool as I was asking about exists.
--
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will bomb the cities of Vietnam, defoliate the jungles, herd the
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Would strongly do a good thoughly check under the counter if your not going to cut the board as close as you can with your saw then take a wood chiesel and finish the last bit
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Aem gave you the correct answer.
If you want to proceed along your chosen course a Dremel or spiral saw (RotoZip) with a right angle attachment will allow you to cut out the PB under the cabinet over-hang. I have done it both ways.
Colbyt
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I suspect a pro would do it right and say the cabinet has to come out to do it right.
But since they wanna do it on the cheap, you would still require pro tools. I have no idea of the cost but I suspect a lotta bucks.
"Crain makes power saws for undercutting along walls, door jambs, and even under toe spaces to tear out underlayment."
    http://www.craintools.com/fs-specialtysaws.html
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When I did my kitchen floor, I cut close to the cabinets with a skill saw, and used a flat shovel to pop up the underlayment. most of the underlayment snapped off at the cabinets what was left was chiseled off
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I am not sure of the name but such saws exist. Try looking for "toe-space" or "kick-space". They are basically small flush cutting circular saws where the saw blade has a recessed center for the shaft and nut.
Don Young
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Did a little more research. It's called a toe kick saw.
Crain 795 Toe-Kick Saw $255 shipping included. http://www.tools4flooring.com/crain-795-toekick-saw-p-280.html
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Well lookie here. Harbor Freight has one for $60. May even have bearings...and metal ones at that.
http://search.harborfreight.com/cpisearch/web/search.do?keyword=toe+kick&Submit=Go
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On 8/16/2008 7:28 PM Red Green spake thus:

http://search.harborfreight.com/cpisearch/web/search.do?keyword=toe+kick&Submit=Go
Thanks! I just bought a bunch of stuff at a local Harbor Freight (Newark, CA) and plan on buying more when I get the chance. I'll see how the estimates my customer gets from flooring places come in; I may be able to pay for this tool with this job.
BTW, I'm sure it has metal bearings, probably ball bearings at that, and would work fine for the amount of use I'd give it. I just picked up a "sawzall" (Chicago) at HF for $20. *Twenty bucks*. Wouldn't have gotten it if I used it every day, of course, but I don't.
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will bomb the cities of Vietnam, defoliate the jungles, herd the
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Hmmm, didn't see this post. Not sure what happened or if just delayed. Sorry for the duplicate if that's the case.
------------------
I suspect a pro would do it right and say the cabinet has to come out to do it right.
But since they wanna do it on the cheap, you would still require pro tools. I have no idea of the cost but I suspect a lotta bucks.
"Crain makes power saws for undercutting along walls, door jambs, and even under toe spaces to tear out underlayment."
    http://www.craintools.com/fs-specialtysaws.html
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