About recalls for runaway cars.

Page 6 of 10  

On Mar 18, 7:53am, snipped-for-privacy@smallboots.com wrote:

OOPPS!!! misread the post.
And no, the reason for RFB is because it is the most reasonable way to do it. All the hot air spent trying to defend LFB hasn't accomplished even a small dent in the reasons _NOT_ to do it.
Harry K
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On Thu, 18 Mar 2010 08:50:01 -0700 (PDT), Harry K

Well, if you said it, it MUST be true!

Well, certainly not to someone with limited intellect and a securely closed mind it hasn't. Just keep your fingers in your ears, and keep shouting "NO, NO, NO" as loud as you can.
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On Thu, 18 Mar 2010 08:50:01 -0700 (PDT), Harry K

The alleged reasons not to do it have been demolished. The fact that it won't changed the ossified minds on display here has no bearing on that fact.
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On Thu, 18 Mar 2010 07:47:46 -0700 (PDT), Harry K

You sure about that, Harry?? Every standard shift car I ever drove had 3 pedals. Some even had 4 (foot operated emergency brake)
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On Thu, 18 Mar 2010 16:44:06 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

My 1940's Chevys had 4 pedals, but none were the emergency brake.
And VW had a "clutchless" stick shift. I think it had a centrifical clutch that did not require a pedal. It disengaged when you took your foot off the gas.
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On Thu, 18 Mar 2010 17:20:26 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

- No it disengaged when you touched the shift lever.
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On Thu, 18 Mar 2010 20:25:26 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Really? Then why did you have to lower revs to get it into the next higher gear?
Do a google or bing search for "Saxomat" for more information.
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On Mar 18, 6:07pm, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

Non-synchro box at a guess.
Harry K
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On Thu, 18 Mar 2010 21:33:23 -0700 (PDT), Harry K

Bad guess. It had a centrifical cluych that needed to be disengaged.
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On Fri, 19 Mar 2010 06:27:48 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

Nope. No centrigical clutch. A vacuum operated clutch, with the vacuum controlled by a solenoid valve operated by touching the gearshift lever. It also had a torque converter, like an automatic, that allowed the engine to idle in gear, and even pull away (sluggishly) in second gear.
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On Fri, 19 Mar 2010 23:15:53 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

WRONG. 100% W-R-O-N-G
I even gave you the exact name (Saxomat) of the system so you could go and read about it for yourself. You really are a complete dullard, Clare.
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On Sat, 20 Mar 2010 08:28:37 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

I said you were talking about a different system. SAXOMAT was NEVER installed on a VW destined for North America. PERIOD.
So YOU are 100% wrong. Every "semi-automatic" VW in North America was an "auto-stick" which used a solenoid controlled vacuum operated clutch and a fluid torque converter.
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On Sat, 20 Mar 2010 18:15:26 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Read EXACTLY what I said, and not what you wish I said. I was, and remain 100% correct and you, as usual, remain 1000% wrong, but convinced in your hazy little mind that you are somehow correct.
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On Thu, 18 Mar 2010 21:07:03 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

You must be talking about a different system. I'm talking the "autostick" Officially called the Volkswagen Automatic Stickshift, this transmission was a three speed manual transmission connected to a vacuum-operated automatic clutch. When the driver put their hand on the gearshift the clutch would disengage by a 12volt solenoid operating the vacuum clutch, allowing shifting between gears, once they removed their hand the clutch would re-engage automatically. The transmission was also equipped with a torque converter, allowing the car to idle in gear, like an automatic. This transmission was first available on the 1968 Volkswagen Beetle, and was made available on the Karmann Ghia in 1969. VW dropped the transmission option altogether in 1976.
I've both driven and worked on them.
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Along the same lines, the Smart (at least the Europe versions) have a manual transmission that shifts itself like an automatic. You let your foot off the gas and it disengages the clutch and sifts. The shifting is slow though, and took some getting used to the power lag. I was driving a ForFour and got 42 mpg over 1200 miles
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On Sat, 20 Mar 2010 00:03:53 -0400, "Ed Pawlowski"

Clare is not talking about the transmission I mentioned BY NAME.
See: Saxomat
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On Fri, 19 Mar 2010 22:32:36 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I even gave you the exact NAME of the system I was talking about, so you could look it up.
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On Sat, 20 Mar 2010 08:17:37 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

Except the Saxomat was never sold on a VW in North America. As far as I know it was not sold in ANYTHING in North America We didn't get Borgward, Goliath, Trabant, DKW, GLAS, NSU, and Wartburg over here, and no '61-66 1800 Fiats or Saab 93s with "automatic" transmissions.
The true Saxomat did have an centrifical clutch. The VW Autostick as sold in North America between roughly 1965 and 1968 did NOT.
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On Mar 18, 1:44pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Ype, case of HUA, misread the post. Already replied to out LFBer.
Harry K
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On Mar 18, 1:44pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

If you count _all_ the foot operated controls, some had 5, or even 6 if there was a foot operated emergency. dimmer, starter, clutch, brake, gas. Of course the dimmer and starter weren't "pedals". There were even a few that had a foot operated radio tuner....oops, I forgot the 'stomp on this to spray windshield thingy' Geez, It didn't seem so crowde when I was driving them :)
Curious, About what year did the starter become fairly standard on the key switch? Same for about when the dimmer moved to the column.
With all the old cars I drove back then I can't recall if my 38 chev had starter on key but I am sure it still had the dimmer on floor.
Harry K
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