About recalls for runaway cars.

Page 3 of 10  

On Sat, 20 Mar 2010 07:04:15 -0700 (PDT), Harry K

The LFB has heard them all before and knows they are nonsense for HIM/HER. If YOU are not capable of LFB then of course you should not do it. It's similar to how they used to teach in drivers ed that SAFE drivers ALWAYS had their hands at 10 and 2 on the steering wheel. That's just they way it ALWAYS was. EVERYONE knew you HAD to keep your hands there to be SAFE. Along comes airbags and suddenly 9 and 3 are just fine. The truth is, it never mattered where you put your hands within reason and everyone needed to find their own personal sweet spot. Just like any other aspect of driving there are many ways to accomplish the same tasks. Some ways are better then others but not necessarily for everyone.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 18 Mar 2010 07:39:46 -0700 (PDT), Harry K

Depends on the emergency. If it's one I anticipated *might* happen and it does, I gain 44 feet. If it's not anticipated I'm no worse off then anyone else. So on average I'm better off. It's not a "few extra feet" I'm gaining, it's nearly 50 feet, that's about 3 car lengths.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Prove it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 19 Mar 2010 14:09:24 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

I've explained it about 6 times. If you haven't got it figured it out by now there's nothing more I can do for you. Any further lessons you will have to pay for at my usual hourly rate, which at $50 is a bargain.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

And if when traffic starts to back up you LIFT your right foot from the pedal, and get ready to stop, you have the same reduction in reaction time, PLUS you have started to slow down a bit already, opening up your "opportunity space".
I know, if you DON'T have to stop, you've added another 0.2 seconds to the length of your trip. In heavy traffic thos 0.2 seconds all add up and you end up late for work - or worse yet for supper. Then you end up with hot toungue and cold shoulder for supper.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

the break pedal If the pedal was worn on the left side instead of the right and the customer complained of poor brake life I told them to stop riding the brake, and to brake with the right foot.
If they wore the pads out early because of left foot braking and riding the brake they didn't stand a chance.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Yes. NO ONE was teaching students to use the left foot for the brake. NO ONE.

You're dangerous. That's obvious to everyone.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 14 Mar 2010 20:41:50 -0500, Douglas Johnson

There is nothing wrong with left foot braking, I've done it all my life. Apparently some people don't have the skills required to do it and those people should stick to using just the one foot.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

Not one manual transmission was available in my high school drivers ed class in Michigan in the mid 60's.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Up here in Elmira Ontario 1968 was the first year you could take Driver's Ed on an automatic in the highschool program. I learned on a standard Pontiac.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 14 Mar 2010 19:27:08 -0500, Douglas Johnson

The one exception is if you drive in NASCAR races. Drive fast, turn left and burn the brakes up. LFB
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Because you want to develop the HABIT of right foot braking as you would on a stick shift car,so you do the same thing all the time,developing a REFLEX that you naturally revert to in an emergency,no matter which type you're driving,no thought needed.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

My father has used his left foot for the brake for as long as I can remember. He's driven automatics for about the last sixty years. He told me that he used to wonder if he'd be as quick getting onto the pedal with his left foot as with his right -- then one day, years ago, somebody pulled out in front of him on US 31; he said after he got the car stopped, he realized he had *both* feet on the brake.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 14 Mar 2010 19:27:08 -0500, Douglas Johnson

car had a tendancy to stall occaisionally coming to a stop - 1968 Rebel. When I explained why I did it they said fix the car.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Me either. I took driver's ed in the late '60s(NY) and they never taught that nonsense. It would be far too confusing for an inexperienced newbie.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Judging by this 1964 article, it may well have been true. I do recall discussions about it but we did not have driver's ed in school so I don't know what our state did back then. This is also backed up by the last cite below.
http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,897172,00.html Some states encourage left-foot braking (among them, South Dakota and Michigan); some disqualify or penalize any license applicant who does it (Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Utah). Most states have no policy at all. And there is, in fact, something to be said for both sides-or both feet.
Read more: http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,897172,00.html#ixzz0iCxEpefI
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Left-foot_braking
Road use Many commentators advise against the use of left-foot braking while driving on public roads.[7][8]
However, some commentators do recommend left-foot braking as routine practice when driving vehicles fitted with an automatic transmission, when maneuvering at low speeds.[9]
Proponents of the technique note that in low-speed maneuvers, a driver of a vehicle with a manual transmission will usually keep a foot poised over the clutch pedal, ready to disengage power when the vehicle nears an obstacle. This means that disengagement is also possible in the event of malfunction such as an engine surge. However, the absence of a clutch on a vehicle with automatic transmission means that there is no such safety override, unless the driver has a foot poised over the brake pedal.[9]
Critics of the technique suggest that it can cause confusion when switching to or from a vehicle with a manual transmission,[7] and that it is difficult to achieve the necessary sensitivity to brake smoothly when your left foot is used to operating a clutch pedal.[8]
http://www.scottgood.com/jsg/blog.nsf/d6plinks/SGOD-6NY25Y Hello Scott, I am a retired Driving Instructor. I am almost 70 and took to Left Foot Braking about 15 years ago. Taught few students LFB including my two children. I believe if we can convince Insurance companies that they will save very big by way of claims that might have a great impact. Trying to talk to Driving Schools is something I have not had any luck with. How do we (You and I) go about it. I am very passionate about this. Regards Enver Khorasanee
http://searchchicago.suntimes.com/autos/news/letters/233973,CAR-News-Letters29.article Q. I'm 79 years old and took driving lessons in 1950, when my instructor told me to use my left foot to brake and right foot to accelerate. I also was told to pump the brake pedal four or five times before stopping on slippery roads to assure the best braking. My driving record is excellent. But during a recent driver's license test, I was told to use my right foot for both braking and accelerating. There is nothing in the Illinois Rules of the Road book that says a driver must brake with the right foot, is there? --P.B., Chicago
A. If accustomed to braking with your left foot after more than 50 years, keep using it for braking.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Darn it. There you go ruining a discussion with those dreaded _facts_ again :)
Harry K
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thank you. I was in Michigan. -- Doug
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

using left foot for braking makes it possible for one to apply both brakes and throttle at the same time. In most cases,outside of the track,this is not good.
Besides,just because a state or states "encourages" something does not make it right or proper. States are not any authority on driving techniques. That "encouragement" could merely derive from some bureaucrat of the same bent as you guys.
IMO,operating differently depending on what car you're using means you aren't developing the reflex or habit that people revert to under emergencies.Thus,you could,under pressure,use the wrong foot at a critical time.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Amen to that. I switch between a Ford 500 auto and an 89 F150 manual everything and get confused on the cruis controls particulary and have been known to try to get into gear in the f150 without using the clutch.
Harry K
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.