? about paint and drywall mud

I'm just about finished striping the wallpaper from our kitchen wall. We want to texture the wall and paint it. I thought I saw on some TV show someone adding the paint to the drywall mud, and therefore skipped the steps of priming and painting. The added benefit would be that if a spot got chipped, you wouldn't have a white spot.
Anyone know how to do this? Do you use powered drywall and mix the paint in, or can you do it with ready mixed drywall mud?
Thanks.
Dave
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First you dont know if there was any grease on the walls before it was papered, so prime it. adding mud to paint probably wont look finished and it will need repainting to get an even color. Prime and use texture paint. Kitchens need good prep because cooking leaves residue on walls.
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snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (m Ransley) wrote in 3135.bay.webtv.net:

I bought the house new and the kitchen was papered when we moved in, so I know this isn't going to be a problem. I planned to add paint to the mud, and apply the mud in a textured way. Maybe I didn't make my self clear in what I was planning to do.
Dave
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You may find it still has to be repainted since the mud will absorbe the paint and need sealing, it is possibly worth a try. But texture paint is ready to go and mixed properly , can be bought in different grades and insures future touch ups will have the right texture.
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You have to seal up the mud once it dries, or it will turn back to mud if it gets wet.
I don't think you could put in enough paint to seal it, w/o affecting the mud in a negative way.
Even if you wall paper, you want to prime and paint, otherwise the wall paper & glue will stick to the drywall paper, and you could never remove it.
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Dave Solly wrote:

From my experience, there is only one thing worse than textured walls in a kitchen, and that's a popcorn ceiling. If at all possible, I would recommend that you make the walls as smooth as possible and paint with a good washable enamel. Makes keeping the kitchen clean a whole lot easier. But if you are going to texture it, then don't dilute the ready mix with paint. Get a dry bag, and a large bucket. Substitute a gallon of latex paint for a gallon of the recommended water amount and mix. Consistent texturing over a large area is tricky if you're not experienced or "artistic."
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Excellent advise. You ever try to repair a ding in a popcorn ceiling or a textured wall? It is nearly impossible to make a repair that doesn't stick out like a sore thumb. With smooth walls and ceilings, you can fix any damage to the point where it is invisible...
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This is not done to skip the prime and paint. I use this method for "roller stipple" texture. It adds more body to the texture and makes the texture stand up. It also pre-colors the texture if you use the intended wall color.
I mix 1 box of premixed mud to a gallon or two of paint applied with a long nap roller (3/4 or more). It does demand that you give the walls a uniform application and really watch the texture you are leaving.
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Keep the whole world singing . . . . DanG (remove the sevens) snipped-for-privacy@7cox.net

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This must be your first kitchen. Otherwise you'd already know that "texture" is a bad thing in a kitchen. That is, if you ever do more cooking than heating up a box dinner in a microwave. Textures trap grease, which traps dirt, and it all turns to this really sticky mung that's incredibly hard to remove down deep in the crevices. That's why I hate even cabinets with too much molding to them. Too many places for grease and dirt to hide and not be gotten to easily. The perfect surface for kitchen walls and ceiling would be stainless steel or porcelain, which a lot of commercial kitchens have. At least a nice semi gloss painted flat surface is more easily scrubbable. Stick with that.
And if you're gonna experiment with applying a texture to a surface, then do so in a second bedroom or laundry room or some place you won't stare at the imperfections each and every day. Because it takes a lot of skill to do right, and even lots of experienced painters don't do so hot a job at it. And it's even harder to remove than wallpaper is. So don't curse yourself with "individuality". You can still put your stamp on your home without ruining it's practical aspects. Besides, textured walls in anything other than a genuine adobe or hundred year old falling down wreck are an affectation and look kinda stupid.
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