About Home Inspectors...(a rant)

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Roger Shoaf wrote:

Undisturbed, it <may>...but most wire used at the time had fiber insulation or natural rubber compounds that will have detiorated over the years...in our old barn and house, it has just fallen off the wires in places leaving bare wire....(no longer used, just some is left abandoned in place)
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"Roger Shoaf" wrote

as others note, it is ok if never altered, but in this case a) it had been obviously hacked into in numerous places b) failing insulation had left exposed bare wire in numerous places c) we could not find an insurance company that would cover us with K&T
since we could not afford to have the work done, i paid an electrician to come in and put in a new 200 amp service and then rewired the whole house from scratch myself. despite never having done electrical work, i passed both inspections on the first try with no corrections. i also managed to do the whole thing without ever getting an electrical shock :-O
(this is why i like DIY - i learned a huge amount, saved a lot of money, was able to get it done exactly the way i want it and developed a knowledege base that makes me much more confident in future projects.)
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On 12 Jan 2005 04:49:29 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

The first and only time I used an inspector was on my first home some 15 years ago. Back then friends advised us not to waste our money and we took the opinion that you are taking now and went ahead with an inspector who seemed reasonable.
Of course, he missed a significant problem with the roof. Same old song and dance.
Since then, I've become self-educated enough regarding home owner problematic issues and I perform my own home inspections. I've found a few problems that I'm convinced a paid "professional" would have glanced over.
Prior to my getting an inspector - and now 15 years later, I have yet to hear a positive comment from any friends or co-workers regarding home inspectors.
Word of mouth says a lot about the industry.
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wrote:

a house is one of the most important things you will ever buy, and can be a very costly mistake. take a couple weeks. check out the books at the library. come up with your own punchlist and take it to each house. inform yourself.
another good idea is to have a look at someone elses inspection sheets. you can use it as your punch list, or at least a good start on it.
i too perform my own inspections. sure i might (will) miss something, but so might (will) the inspector and he charges an arm and a leg, and in either case im still stuck paying for it myself.
randy
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My sister's home inspector turned out a glowing report. After she bought the house she found out his inspection was no good. He had been recommended.
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wrote:

No good for what?
just asking....
tom @ www.FreelancingProjects.com
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On Tue, 11 Jan 2005 19:28:35 -0600, John Willis
Yesterday we went and repaired that leaky roof the home inspector passed. Without exception that was the worst valley installation I've ever seen in over 25 years of doing this kind of work. I stand by my earlier comments about the installers as well as that inspector. There is no excuse for that kind of behavior. The installers of the roof had no business being there and neither did the home inspector. Splitting hairs about how the home inspector was just trying to keep a realtor happy by not wrecking a deal is just rationalization and making excuses for attitudes and behaviors that have no excuse.
As for our repair, I guarantee the valley will not leak. I don't guarantee the rest of the roof at all and in fact I know that there will be other leaks show up, I just don't know where yet. The only way to repair an installation this bad is to tear it all off and start fresh. Fortunately we get big hail storms through here every few years-hence our high home insurance rates!:~(
Thanks for the comments regarding the lack of integrity of many home inspectors. Failing to do a job the way it ought to be done when someone is paying you their hard earned money is no different than stealing. If the best of your ability isn't good enough then you (this particular home inspector, I mean) need to find another line of work.
-- John Willis (Remove the Primes before e-mailing me)
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John Willis wrote: ...

...
Don't think anybody was making an excuse or justifying incompetence (at least I certainly wasn't)--just pointing out the conflict of interest in utilizing any one who is, in fact, representing the seller (whether directly or not). That some are more ethical and competent than others is, of course, obvious.
Anyway, glad that the problem has been addressed by someone who (apparently) is both...
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On Thu, 13 Jan 2005 09:31:07 -0600, in alt.home.repair you wrote:

Thanks for the understanding. Usually I can just let these kinds of things go, but when the home owner said she had it inspected and nothing at all was said about the roof, it just went against the grain.
When tearing out the valley, on the second shingle from the top on the first side I was removing, I found no fewer than forty 1 1/2" Paslode staples shot through a GAF Timberline shingle that was less than two feet long. I am not making this up. And the rest of the valley only got worse...
-- John Willis (Remove the Primes before e-mailing me)
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John Willis wrote:

...
Well, let me tell you about what I found on the roof here Dad paid untold gazillions on... :)
Wood shingle, no starter row on two sides w/ open deck roof. Holes as wide as 1/2" by 1" direct to the soffet underneath...
Use of metal drip edge w/ wood shingle on roof where a bed mould was used so that the shingle end/side overhangs for drip edge and leaves a really nice detail. The drip edge was put on that mould, the shingle left short -- resulting in capillary action pulling the water under the shingle, over and behind the drip edge and down the fascia behind the bed mould. Net result--paint failure in less than two years of the brand new paint job as well.
Since the roof is <5 years old, I made a drip edge of 6" wide flashing w/ a 1" break at the roof pitch angle and slid it under the end of the shingles to provide the necessary drip edge. Works like a charm and helps hide the ugly drip edge at least some. Some so-called "professionals" aren't. :(
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