abestos in the air, analysis recommendation?

Hi, we had some popcorn ceiling removed from a room. That ceiling had abestos (the neighbor had their popcorn ceiling analyzed). Now we are concerned that the air in that room has abestos. Is this a 'valid' concern? Can anyone recommend a company which can 'analyze' the air in that room (does such thing exist?). Thanks.
Terry
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The damage is done. Turn on the attic fan, open a window and it's gone. If it's been over 4 hours ago, it's gone. Millions of popcorn ceilings are scraped clean and no one worries about the asbestoes that may be there. I know I don't. It takes 20 years of daily exposure before you MIGHT display a symptom 20 years after that. Asbestoes is all hype. Another government intervention on a good product.
steve

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Steve Barker wrote:

were the problem. Johns-Manville knew for generations that constant exposure was a problem and hid that fact. Ask anyone who is still alive (or their survivors) who has asbestosis or lung cancer because they worked in a shipyard and were exposed to it without any protection how much hype it is.
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In the case of a painted ceiling, it is encapsulated in the paint. Yes, working with the raw material was a problem, but in most every other case, it is over hyped and not so. Different situations entirely.
As for what the OP should do, I'd do nothing. Any problems are now gone and I doubt it was a problem from the start. My wife and I did our ceilings and I'd not hesitate to do it again.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

I'm glad that Edwin is so positive about what is floating in the air the he can't see.
If in doubt, have it tested. Piece of mind is valuable and I'm sure you vaule your family's health.
--
Zyp



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I have more peace of mind than you do. I do know that when asbestos is encapsulated it is perfectly safe. We used water spray to make scraping easier and that knocks down any dust. Your money, so test away as you please. I'll still sleep well in my house.
The hype over so many things stirred up by lawyer sis incredible. Good article in Reader's Digest a month or so ago about some of the asbestos cases and fraud. Mostly a money grab.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

It's more than the cost of the test. If the test comes back positive, the homeowner will probably have to disclose to a subsequent buyer that this property may be deemed a toxic waste dump.

The most ghastly hysteria in recent years was the banning of silicone breast implants. Millions of men suffered for many years until the hype died down and silicone was re-approved.
Sad. Very sad.
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Steve Barker wrote:

I'm glad you believe that Steve;
Ask my father about it. He died from asbestos exposure. It's a serious and real threat. It does not *take* 20 years *of* exposure, it takes a minor amout of exposure and does not show up *until* 20 years.
Asbestos fibers are lighter than air so the fibers never really "settle" like dust might. The fibers also have a "barbed hook" of sorts and once they become imbeded in your lungs, they can't be removed. You body reacts by building a "scare tissue" of sorts around the sight in an attempt to protect you. After the 20 year(s) mark, a cancer known as Mesotheloma develops.
http://abestos-cancer.com /
Asbestos left alone is not harmful unless it becomes *friable* [disintegrates]. Otherwise if you do remove it, have professionals do the job. It's really not that expensive, and you avoid risk to your family and friends.
BTW: Blowing around with a bunch of fans is not going to remove air borne asbestos. Be smart - have the air in your home tested by a professional company. If you value your family and friends, this is the smart chocie.
--
Zyp



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Zyp wrote:

Thanks for the link. EVERY SINGLE REFERENCE on that page refers, in one way or another, to LAWYERS who will help you sue if anyone ever mentioned asbestos in your hearing.
Here's a better quote:
"Since the early 1940s, millions of American workers have been exposed to asbestos. Health hazards from asbestos fibers have been recognized in workers exposed in shipbuilding trades, asbestos mining and milling, manufacturing of asbestos textiles and other asbestos products, insulation work in the construction and building trades, and a variety of other trades. Demolition workers, drywall removers, asbestos removal workers, firefighters, and automobile workers also may be exposed to asbestos fibers. However, recent studies do not support an increased risk of lung cancer or mesothelioma among automobile mechanics exposed to asbestos through brake repair..."
The above from the National Cancer Institute: http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/factsheet/Risk/asbestos
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In the mid 50s, I took high school art class. We were given asbestos powder to mix with water to use for modelling media. We also handled asbestos as it was wrapped around a furnace that we took out and used asbestos paper to seal ducts on the new furnace. I am still alive and kicking.

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HeyBub wrote:

Thanks *HeyBud*
I didn't spend that much time reviewing all of the link. I do know that Lawyers [ambulance chasers] are like sharks in the ocean.
I'm glad that Edwin P. used water to deter fibers from becoming air born. I wonder though, if he used a "suffactent" or "glycol" added to his water to keep the fibers contained. I also wonder what he did with the materials he "scraped?" Did he just throw it in the local trash? Did he consider how it is a problem at the dump? Did he consider all those other folks who may be exposed to his material? And yes, sorry Edwin P., but that material still belongs to you. [It could come back and haunt you in the future.] I wonder what other "precautions" were taken to protect others who might not be aware of the materials they handled while Edwin P. - "I'll still sleep well in my house"
--
Zyp



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Proper spelling is surfactant. Matter of fact, I did as it breaks the tension on the water and makes it wet better.
I also wonder what he did with the materials he

Nope, it belongs to the dump now. Actually, the dump has been sold to a company that dumps ash from incinerators. If you take the time to look up how to dispose of some asbestos containing materials, you put in in plastic bags and take it to the dump. Really, have you checked?
[It could come back and haunt you in the future.] I wonder

Just to clarify, I sleep well in my house, on long flights, and most hotel rooms.
I know you have good intentions, but you really should educate yourself about asbestos and how it can be handled safely. And how to protect yourself if there are concerns as there can be under certain circumstanses. It can be handled, touched, you can even lick it with no harm.
I don't denly that there were situtations in mines, shipyards and a few other places where the dangers of the fibers were hidden once it was known potential problems did exist. That does not mean that all asbestos is bad and will kill. Keep in mind, encapsulation is one of the best ways to make it safe. You can encapsulate the fibers in paint.
Here are a few more tips Removing asbestos from your home If you do choose to remove the non-licensable asbestos materials yourself it will help if you take the following precautions:
a.. wear a dust mask approved for asbestos; b.. wear a disposable overall c.. keep other people away from the working area; d.. wet the material well with water containing a little washing up liquid; check that there is no potential for contact with electricity first; e.. always remove whole sheets or components; do not break them up f.. place any loose or small items in strong plastic labelled bags and seal; g.. clean up all dust with a damp cloth and then seal it in a plastic bag whilst damp; h.. do not use a domestic vacuum cleaner as dust may pass through the filter.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

Fine Edwin P.
Will this link be a good resource? http://www.epa.gov/asbestos/
None the less though, I believe removing or encapsulation [I'll try to work on my spelling ability] asbestos is not somthing a homeowner / DIY 'r shoud dive into lightly. And recommending DIY's is not in the public's best interest. I'm only trying to say it is dangerous and should not be down - played.
Read this information
http://www.epa.gov/asbestos/pubs/ashome.html\\
--
Zyp



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I'm trying to say it is not as dangerous as some people think and can be handled without great expense by a DIYer and can be done safely. There is a lot of misinformation started by lawyers an opportunists that want your money.
BTW, your link gives me a File Not Found message. Maybe it was not the truth?
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on 8/25/2007 9:35 PM Edwin Pawlowski said the following:

Take the slash off the end of the link. http://www.epa.gov/asbestos/pubs/ashome.html
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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willshak wrote:

That's just it Edwin P. It isn't that expensive! You make it out to be thousands when it's not. And in California, if it's not thousands here, its w-a-y cheaper elsewhere. And the couple of bucks saved may not be worth it. [Some DIY's just shouldn't!]
--
Zyp



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On 8/23/2007 11:59 AM, Steve Barker wrote: <snip>
It takes 20 years of daily exposure before you MIGHT display

death. Do you *know* what you're talking about?
--
Ted
I wasn\'t born in Texas but
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wrote:

I'm sure his experience was horrible but a single anecdote proves nothing. How was he exposed? How long was the exposure?
Doug
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YEP.
Do you *know* what you're talking about?

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Steve Barker LT wrote:

I guess I can only relate by my *personal* experience. I admit the *chance* might be slim, but it wasn't for my father. He worked as a driller on water and oil rigs for 10 years, then, worked as a HVAC [heating] installer, service, and owner for the next 22 years. During that time he handled a considerable amount of asbestos heating insulation on ducts and in the wheat paste used to seal those ducts.
And, after considerable medical diagnosis, he *was* diagnosed with Mesotheloma cancer of the lungs.
There is a considerable increase of risk if you smoke, and he did. Those that didn't smoke though in his trade ended up with Mesotheloma as well though. [Friends I grew up knowing.]
For those who want to be cautious, do so. I am. I'm in the HVACR trade, [36 years now] and when ever we come across this hazardous material, we recommend it's removal by professionals that are licensed and insured for that type of work. BTW: It really isn't that expensive to *just do it right.!*
FWIW: My family, friends and the general population is worth more than saving a couple of buck$.
--
Zyp



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