AAA auto club

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On 9/20/2015 8:23 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Nixon and Kennedy talked about substance. The clown circus last week was mostly folly.
People have (I think) moved beyond the fact that a "sweaty" tricky dick made him look less capable than a "composed" JFK.
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On Sun, 20 Sep 2015 10:53:52 -0700, Don Y

Everyone leaves out the part about Nixon being right most of the time and Kennedy spouting lots of bullshit ... but in a very charming way.
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Pretty much the same here, though there are also now a number of stations that show old TV shows and movies that we'll watch.
None of it is critical really, aside maybe from seeing news that might be of importance. While there are things I do enjoy in the end I just don't place a very high value on entertainment.

Yep, you're playing my tune! I also have a large library of Beta and VHS tapes, CED "needlevision" discs, laserdiscs, and DVDs. Even without any external input there is more stuff here than I would be able to watch in my remaining lifespan.

The worst part is the way the audio cuts out immediately. With the old analog system the sound would hang in until the end and you could follow what was going on even if the picture was fading in and out.
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On Sun, 20 Sep 2015 15:40:02 +0000 (UTC), Roger Blake

You can stream most of the old shows without any actual "cable" service. You still need to buy bandwidth tho. If I was king I would make the companies unbundle content from bandwidth anyway. Our broadband is some of the most expensive in the world because they bury content in bandwidth. You can easily see the advantage of unbundling if you just look at phone service. For those of us who are old enough to remember Ma Bell, you remember how expensive phone service was and how limited it was. We wouldn't have universally available internet if we were still living with the pre 1978 Ma Bell.
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On 9/20/2015 8:40 AM, Roger Blake wrote:

I use the TV as "company" late at night (when I do most of my work). Typically, put on a DVD of something I've already seen. So, I can follow along with the plot purely from memory (the TV isn't visible from my workstations). If I get tired and need a break -- or, know that a particularly exciting or funny part of the show is coming up -- I'll get up and sit in front of the tube for a short while. Then, return to my work.

I've transcribed (transcoded?) my tape and LVD libraries to DVD-R's. Tired of having to maintain a VCR with all of its mechanism when I can just as easily use a "disposable" DVD drive from a computer for the same purpose.
It also makes them a lot easier to store -- and, archive to the media library.

Even with snowy video (and tinfoil draped rabbit ears) you could often make out general details in the imagery. It wasn't an all-or-nothing proposition.
Audio is particularly hard for most folks to adapt to "stroboscopicly"; with video, even with dropouts, your eye and mind can integrate the motion to provide some continuity to the scene (as long as the dropouts are fairly brief). With audio, you don't have the same sort of "auditory persistence" to call upon.
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On Sun, 20 Sep 2015 07:09:09 -0700, Don Y

I use TV as a radio quite a bit. I have a set of RF headphones and I like to crank up a Charley Rose or one of the Ken Burns shows when I am working around the house. Most of those documentaries are just tired old slides and B roll clips we have seen hundreds of times so the real content is in the script. Some are embarrassingly out of context. How many times have we seen the clip of the German soldier walking along the side of the road with the MP44 and it was supposed to be the invasion of France or Russia?
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On Sun, 20 Sep 2015 13:37:32 +0000 (UTC), Roger Blake

either works or it doesn't. There is nothing in between. When the picture breaks up, the sound goes too.
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On 09/20/2015 10:08 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I've sure seen A LOT of "in between", including audio with mostly little bits of words audible like bup-bip-bup.

This often produces something resembling a low resolution version of the picture, with many missing frames.
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On 09/20/2015 08:37 AM, Roger Blake wrote:
[snip]

I wonder why people keep saying that? It's true for a single bit, and far from true for a stream.
Ever seen pixellated video and audio th-- -ou-d- l---e t-is?
[snip]
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Because we are comparing it to the previous analog TV system which would degrade much more gracefully under poor signal conditions. It wasn't an all-or-nothing proposition.
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On Sun, 20 Sep 2015 12:37:16 -0500, Sam E

When my digital signal breaks up, I get garbage pixels on the screen and the sound mutes.
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On 9/21/2015 12:27 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Will the AAA auto club tow you in?
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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On 09/19/2015 10:14 PM, Don Y wrote:
[snip]

Malware can be hardware too. You need to design and make your own chips, using raw materials you provide.
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On 9/19/2015 9:22 PM, Sam E wrote:

Technically, malware is "software" (algorithms). Though, where it resides in the software hierarchy can vary. E.g., when part of *firmware*, it can be harder to remove (the firmware has to be updateable, by design, and the vendor has to take the effort to produce new firmware that preserves the intended function while removing the actual "infestation".
There;s been considerable talk of installing malware in computer *components* at the firmware level. By way of example, the computer that resides *in* every disk drive (that makes the disk drive operate *as* a disk drive) has firmware that can be upgraded (which also means "infected"). Your mouse, keyboard, CD/DVD drive all have firmware (though probably only the optical drive is updateable/infectable).
The "chip" on your motherboard that implements the network connection has firmware that controls its operation. Likewise, the "chip" that drives your display output.
Most of these are so specific in nature that they would be hard to universally "infect". And, would require intimate knowledge of the associated operating system in order for their "infection" to be able to do anything "useful" (from the attackers' point of view). I.e., you could deliberately scramble a disk's contents by infecting its controller firmware; or, render the contents inaccessible. But, you'd be hard pressed to cause the computer to do something "specific" that would buy you anything.
[A notable exception would be to have the controller notice when the boot record was being fetched and corrupt that record to install a rootkit, effectively. But, if you aren't running the OS that the rootkit was designed to exploit, this would fall apart. A smart infection would recognize this fact and *hide* -- soas not to tip off the computing community of its existence!]
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On 9/19/2015 8:28 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Or, they may insist that you *remove* it! E.g., walk into a bank with a cap and sunglasses and you'll quickly draw attention to yourself!

The difference is, you have the option of *not* using their services! There's no way to "opt out" of NSA surveillance!
I self-censor what I discuss with folks based on their email provider. This isn't foolproof; google handles mail for some ISP's without applying their name to the domain!

China and Britain have excessive monitoring capabilities.
As to "never actually use", I contend that the volume of data collected defies anything other than *targeted* use -- looking for something *specific*.
You can use Big Data to identify trends. But, only if those trends manifest in reasonably "static" ways. E.g., if someone placed a Craigslist ad in January using a particular phrasing; then visited the Bolshoi ballet 9 months later (and happened to use the men's lavatory on the second floor); then placed a phone call to a particular phone number 2 months later, you'd be hard pressed to extract this relationship from the amount of data you've collected. Even if it was a 100% positive indicator of <something> of interest to you!
Instead, you look for more static data that "stands out" by itself in shorter terms or with less associated "noise" (e.g., wanting flying lessons and being of middle eastern descent)
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On 9/19/2015 2:09 PM, Don Y wrote:

My bank does have a hat, hood, sunglasses sign.
I'm tempted to do like the pilot on the comedy Airplane, and come in with ten layers of hood, hat, sun glasses, visor, nose and mustache glasses, safety visor, and the list goes on.
Likely get arrested for it, but it would be a brief laugh for me. On the way to booking, of course.
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On 9/19/2015 1:15 PM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Not how I enjoy getting my jollies!
When I lived in Chitown, I would often have to pick up or drop off friends stopping in for a visit, business or even a lengthy layover.
When returning with them to the terminal (departures) I would recite a little speech: "I'm going to point something out to you. I don't want you to say A WORD! KEEP YOUR MOUTH SHUT!!" This invariably got their curiosity piqued (Don isn't normally this SERIOUS!!).
Then, I would point out a series of signs. All had the general appearance of the "no smoking" sign: a red circle with a slash through it superimposed on an image of a cigarette.
The interesting one replaced the cigarette with a black bowling ball with a burning "wick"...
[Yeah, I know what it is, I told you to look at it! You don't need to tell the entire TERMINAL what it is!!!]
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Mine too. I ignore it. I've told them I need the sunglasses due to an eye condition. (I wear the big wrap-around kind that people typically wear after cataract surgery.) They've never bothered me about wearing a hat or cap. Of course they've known me for years there so it probably doesn't make any difference.

I don't know if there would be anything actually illegal about it, you'd have to look up any relevant statutes. It may be just the bank's policy. In that case they might be within their rights to refuse service but they would not be able to have you arrested. I've never looked that deeply into it.
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On Friday, September 18, 2015 at 12:28:01 AM UTC-4, Don Y wrote:

I do all of my registration and license matters on-line, whenever possible. A used vehicle purchased from a dealer was handled by the dealer. The 2 re cent private sale purchases had to be handled in person.

Our local office might be smaller than a football field but is still pretty large. A cool feature is they recycled a large number of church pews as se ats for their customers.
There is a "reception" counter staffed by 2-3 employees. First, you wait in line to talk to one of those individuals. They handle some transactions, s uch as license photos, eye exams, etc. For vehicle related matters, they as k you what you need to do, they may review your documents quickly just to m ake sure you have the correct forms - they don't review the details - and t hen they give you a number. Off you go to the pews to say your prayers that the wait won't be too long. There is a "wait time clock" behind the recept ion counter but it is far, far from accurate. A big board announces your nu mber and the window you should go to.
In some cases, if there is long line for the reception counter, they will c all out "Anyone just turning in plates?" or "Anyone have a rain check?" The se folks get a number immediately and get sent to the pews.

Yes, this appears to be the case at my DMV also. The numbering system inclu des "A" and "B" series. I can only assume that these letters designate cert ain types of transactions but I haven't gone there enough (thank God) to fi gure out the pattern. As far as I can tell, the "A" and "B" numbers get cal led up sequentially within their letter group, but you might see more than one "A" get called before the next "B" or v-v. That's what leads me to agre e with the "specialization" aspect.
In any case, it does take time, it will always take time. I accept it and d eal with it.
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i'm with Amica now in Calif, for house & car [recommended by Consumer Reports]
i was with AAA in Nevada for 15 years, but when i moved to Calif they treated me like i never existed, and i had to start over as a new customer, basically. It's a whole different entity/company in the 2 states.
Anyway, i was mad and looked around for something better.
marc
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