A "trick" that helped w/ faucet handle...

Seems like there have been several threads recently regarding stuck faucet handles, etc. Just a solution for a problem I had over the weekend in case somebody comes along and googles...
Single lever Delta lavatory faucet needed replacement seats/ball to stop a drip. We have very hard water and the handle was not possible to get off even after letting sit w/ a modified baggie full of vinegar and CLR around it over most of two days. Didn't dissolve enough of the calcification even w/ the set screw out as an access point, surprisingly.
Solution was to take a piece of 3/4" thick hardwood about 3" by 8" and drill a 5/8" hole in the middle. Then split it lengthwise and placed it around the handle behind the knob on the end and used a small C-clamp to hold it in place. This provided a good surface against which to use a hammer/mallet while applying pressure on the other end.
Took a surprising amount of effort w/ the hammer yet, but removed the handle w/o damaging any of the plating, etc.
HTH somebody, maybe...
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Nice!
Dave
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Score: dpb 1
Delta 0
Nice going.
Joe
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Made me think of my very old can of liquid wrench.
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Oren wrote: ...

Very similar problem indeed...cleaned the areas that got wetted very nicely but the fit around the ball stem in the handle was too tight and no way to get the solvent to the area needing it.
Although in this case w/ both being actual reactants rather than simply a wetting agent, I suspect w/ sufficient time they would have _eventually_ dissolved enough to make the handle "let go", but I was tired of waiting... :)
Similar problem w/ most of the wetting agents for rusty fasteners -- they're not able to actually get into the area that really needs it as the corrosion products effectively fill the space. They certainly help if ever get it broken loose have some aid in many cases, but just don't solve the problem in many instances...
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A little "trick" I learned was to tighten a bolt or nut - carefully - when it won't loosen. Back it off a bit and then apply a liquid solvent. It seems to break the grip; allowing the fluid in. Oren
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Meant to add - wood and hammer persuasion. :) Oren
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Oren wrote: ...

My experience has generally been if it's so "growed together" as to be a real problem loosening, there's little chance of tightening it either. The biggest advent for fasteners was the invention of the impact wrench.
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I have a hand held impact wrench. Hit it with my hammer!
Glad the wood and hammer worked for you. My tool box often has a piece of hard wood and a hammer. The go too tools! Oren
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Oren wrote:

They work on occasion mostly for 3/4" and smaller--much of what is a problem for me is larger farm equipment that needs serious help. While there's almost always some way w/ the "old" tricks, air now is so simple it's just the "go to" first routine.

For some things such as this, it's indeed the choice -- also a very good choice for bearings, etc., ...
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