a simple pvc question

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I was assembling a little adapter to make tying a garden hose into an irrigation system. I picked up to parts. Pvc slip to hose end male and female.
They were both marked "outdoor use only".
Why? It doesn't make any difference to me because they were going outside, but it made me curious.
Charlie
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Probably because there is a potential for leakage.
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On 5/12/2010 11:57 AM, Charlie wrote:

I don't know but if I had to guess, it was due to liability. They could be in for a pretty penny if that failed in a wall somewhere. If it fails outside, so what?
Jay
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ANything to do with Potable vs Not Potable?
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hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net wrote:

PVC is OK for potable water. CPVC is rated for hot water. PVC is not. Perhaps that has something to do with it.
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Who uses a garden hose indoors?
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On May 12, 1:22pm, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:
station.com> wrote:

I've used them indoors a few times. They're useful for flushing/ bleeding hydronic heat systems and water heaters.
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Doug Miller wrote:

Anyone draining their water heater, hydronic boiler or similar.
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Pete C. wrote:

draining my fish tank.
emptying a water bed.
when laying saltillo tile, saturating them with water can prevent them from sucking the water out of the grout and staining the tiles. i've watered my living room tiles using a hose (it helped that i replaced the baseboards with cut saltillo tiles).
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On 5/12/2010 2:22 PM, Doug Miller wrote:

I have two waterbeds in the house. Both require the occasional garden hose but only every two-three years. The water within actually evaporates through the pores of the mattress over a very extended period of time.
Jay
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On May 12, 2:22pm, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

Two words: Redneck engineering.
I would not be surprised to find garden hoses in regular use inside homes in such places as the kitchen sink, bathroom shower, etc.. There are a lot of people who simply can't afford, or don't care, to "do it right."
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Perhaps the garden hose barb is not an approved fitting for indoor plumbing. Pvc is ok for potable cold water so that's not the reason.
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wrote:

Perhaps the garden hose barb is not an approved fitting for indoor plumbing. Pvc is ok for potable cold water so that's not the reason.
No barbs involved. the non-hose end was a plain end that took cement. I am not sure, but is the standard hose thread what is used on a washing machine? We only use cold water for the washing machine but the little label on both pieces said outdoors only. Nothing about temperature or potable water. That's why I raised the question. I can't think of why this application of PVC would be any different than for other pieces. There are unions, for example, that are essentially compression fit.
Charlie
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I believe your are correct, washing machine hoses are the same thread as garden hoses. All white pvc is cold only so that's not it. So far we have arrived at no explanation. I use that stuff all the time and I've never encountered a piece that was marked that way. Our drip is run from a regular irrigation system so I have to go from slip fitting pvc to garden hose because the regulators and the 1/2" drip connectors are garden hose threads. Where did you buy it?
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wrote:

I believe your are correct, washing machine hoses are the same thread as garden hoses. All white pvc is cold only so that's not it. So far we have arrived at no explanation. I use that stuff all the time and I've never encountered a piece that was marked that way. Our drip is run from a regular irrigation system so I have to go from slip fitting pvc to garden hose because the regulators and the 1/2" drip connectors are garden hose threads. Where did you buy it?
They came from Lowes.
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Strange, that's typically where my pvc comes from. I don't have a big preference but the lowes are closer to me that the home depots. One near my house and another between me and the office.
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I think you have the answer right there. Do *not* use these things for your washing machine hookup. They're not reliable enough. As someone said, who cares of they leak (or rupture) outside?
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It would be unusual to even be able to use these for a washing machine hook up. You need valves with garden hose barbs for washing machines. I suppose you could rig a ball valve follwed by one of these but given that washing machine hookups come already packaged I'm pressed to see why anyone would?
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wrote:

I think you have the answer right there. Do *not* use these things for your washing machine hookup. They're not reliable enough. As someone said, who cares of they leak (or rupture) outside?
But if they were guarding against a washing machine installation I would have expected "cold water use only" This is a trivial problem, but when I saw the note it suprised me because it did not make sense. At least I am not alone.
Charlie
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How would a "cold water use only" notice guard against use in a washing machine?
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