A Puzzle - Iron and Yellow Colour in the Water

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wrote

The fact is that the Phils amongst us have vested economic interests in their agency or department's continuation.
And each time we advise or suggest something to someone we are all 'selling' something if only an idea. Here Phil is selling Peter away from the 'pros' that he will eventually have to return to for the equipment to solve his problem. Also, the vast majority of 'sales' are actually done by honest, above board and sincere folks plus.... someone is *buying* the product and the knowledge of the salesperson. Don't they have a responsibility in their selections?
Gary Quality Water Associates
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Which means that they have a strong incentive to do the best job they can for the public, and give the best available advice to those who ask for help. They have no profit motive which would tend to lead them to try to sell the consumer things he doesn't need, or which show the best profit margin for the dealer.
You, and other dealers, on the other hand, have a large pecuniary interest in maximizing your profits. Thus I suppose it isn't strange that you'd have such strong objections to consumers consulting an independent expert with no such pecuniary interests.
Gary
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Oh really.
Phil said he hadn't heard of iron causing yellow water after the OP said he had an iron bleedthru of his equipment and I suggested the cause of the yellow water may be iron. I did a search at google and found a number of sites saying some people mistakenly believe tannins are the problem when they have yellow water which also relates to iron. And I didn't see anyone saying or implying it couldn't be iron.

And how is it that you know or believe that is true about me? If you knew more about me you'd know exactly the opposite is true. But do a google Groups search for me and (+) my company name and see if you still think you're right. So far I've donated 6+ years of helping the public understand water quality problems and their solutions and yes, the last year I've made some sales. BTW, they are all based on the lowest prices the person can find anywhere for the same products.
Gary Quality Water Associates
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I suspect that the crud at the bottom of your well and on the sides is causing your coloured water. But after all this, I'm wondering if it wouldn't just be better, and cheaper in the long run, to drill a new well. Not a dug well with concrete rings, but a proper drilled well with 8-inch steel casing. Drilled wells are inherently safer from contamination by surface runoff. Shallow wells with the concrete rings are an ongoing pain because stuff is always getting into them, and they can be difficult to clean. Almost impossible, in your case.
See if any of the neighbours have drilled wells and what their water quality is. You may just be throwing good money after bad by trying to fix your shallow well. Again, the local health inspectors may be able to give you valuable local information on local wells and the groundwater quality.
Good luck.
Phil J.

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I agree somewhat with a new well when compared to the one there now. But there shouldn't be an assumption that with a new well there would be no need for water treatment equipment. You (generally) may not need some of what you have, or it might be too small and you'd need larger or different equipment.
Gary Quality Water Associates
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Sorry for the delay in replying. It took me a while to obtain a clear gallon jug.
This morning I followed the above instructions and left the jug for three hours. There was no change in colour and no sediment appeared at the bottom of the jug. I'm going to leave it for 24 hours to see if there is any change.
The last time I super chlorinated the well, in May about 2 months ago, I left it for 12 hours and then drained it until the pump turned off. Because there was still a chlorine smell, I drained it again two more times and then allowed it to refill completely. When we started using the water again, it turned clear for about two days and then went pale yellow again. I'm not certain exactly what happened to cause this.

The last time was in May 2003.

The color has been present since we arrived last November, 2002.
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Ok, that goes with tannin or collidal iron. You really need to clean and sanitize the well. See my reply to your other reply.
Gary Quality Water Associates
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Gary Slusser wrote:

Geee, I'll have to tell all those folks here with the carbon filters on their irrigation wells that they really don't remove the tannins....
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Maybe they'd appreciate your input if it caused them to spend less money on carbon. But first I think you need to know more about tannins, or I do.
I've been the business of improving water quality, 99% on problem well water BTW, for 15 years now. Admittedly I don't have much experience with tannins but I'll give you a few sources of what I know and you can show me where you see anyone other than novices using carbon for what they obviously are mistakenly calling a tannin problem in their well water.
Here's a google search for "tannin removal" with 280 hits. I doubt you can find anyone proposing mechanical filtration (the trapping of particles) for a tannin problem. Carbon absorbs and adsorbs while trapping some particulates; true tannins are dissolved into the water on the ion level and no mechanical filter will remove ions. And Lowes etc. doesn't sell specialty resin cartridges (tannin specific anion resin) that could. http://tinyurl.com/h3vk
And it was you that said "tannins only color the water ".....So tell me, why would anyone filter tannins from irrigation water? That seems to say they are filtering IRON/rust that stains things tan to orangish reddish brown. You were right, tannins cause discolored water, not surface staining problems. Here's another google search for tannins + staining with 2200+ hits and although I didn't look all that hard, I didn't see where tannin in water causes surface staining when water containing them is allowed to evaporate. http://tinyurl.com/h49f
Now you should be ready to go help those carbon filter guys.
Gary Quality Water Associates
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My crapper was makin me sick to, pumpin to my well , I jus got rid of the kids and no more crap now I crap in my garden , Free fertilizer ... IM ARRAA Master of all shit
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tannin - smannon , chlorene shmorene, Ph BS Crap in it , nat bacteria , does wonders..What did the vikings do,,, crap in it ,,,I live it, eat it, bathe in it ,soak in it so I dont hear it from my weife and kiddies , and IM fine except for a few cancers, i guess
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