A new thing to worry about

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Stormin Mormon wrote:

Go ahead. I won't tell! ;-)
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Life is looking up, for me.
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Christopher A. Young
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Hi!

Well, you *can* but I suspect that you might end up doing a really good job of learning more about Jesus. If you don't meet him, you might say his name a few times rather loudly.
Sorry. I'll stop now. :-)
William
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On Wed, 9 Dec 2009 14:04:04 -0800 (PST), "William R. Walsh"

LMAO!
He's been screaming Jesus here for years!
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And, and also learned the Jesus Method of finding out which breaker connects to a certain electrical outlet. requiring a six or so inch length of 12 or 14 gage wire, with about an inch of each end stripped. Often with the ends gently pounded flat.
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On 12/9/2009 5:14 PM Stormin Mormon spake thus:

Are you saying that's how Jesus would've done it?
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I am a Canadian who was born and raised in The Netherlands. I live on
Planet Earth on a spot of land called Canada. We have noisy neighbours.
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NO, You yell out Jesus when the fire flies. Also a good way to meet Him.
Maybe safer to get a couple of high current devices such as two hair dryers and turn one on and then the other.
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I've suggested the double hair dryer, but I've never seen it done in practice.
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Not sure. I'm unable to find that mentioned in any of the scriptures. More likely that's the exclaimation heard from the electrician.
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

Hey! You stealing my material again?
TDD
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Haier central a/c condensing units --made in China--have a little warning sticker in them that I get a good chuckle out of. They have a little circuit board that is a time delay to prevent short cycling which they refer to as a PCB, and they refer to the 24 volt thermostat wires as"communication wires" The sticker says "Make sure that the communication wires are not hooked up to the line voltage or it will cause the PCB to be out of work" Larry
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

I used to fly sailplanes. Because these non-powered aircraft sometimes land away from the airport, they're designed to be broken down into pieces so they can be loaded on a trailer. Part of every preflight inspection was examining the removable pins that held the wings on, which everyone referred to as "Jesus pins."
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David Brodbeck wrote:

As a broadcast engineer working around large tube type transmitters, one has to be mindful of residual high voltage in the equipment. There is always an insulated pole with a metal hook and grounding conductor attached that is used to discharge any dangerous stray current. It's called a "Jesus Stick". The things can also be seen hanging around any high voltage equipment facilities.
TDD
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The Daring Dufas wrote:

I worked in brodcasting for decades and never heard it called that. Also, I only saw them in small transmitters. I've been inside some big transmitters, including the 500KW WLW transmitter. The only TV transmitter I saw with a shorting stick was 500 watts. The 195 KW UHF transmitters would either vaporize a shorting stick, or destroy the HV supply.
Have you ever been inside one of the Harris solid state AAM transmitters with a high current 300 volt DC power supply? It will kill you just as fast as any tube transmitter.
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Michael A. Terrell wrote:

NO EXCREMENT?! I was out in the Marshall Islands 20 years ago and got to explore the old phased array radar installation on Meck island at the Kwajalein Atoll. I think it had two power supplies at one time but there was one left in what was called the Frankenstein room, an incredible contraption that looked like the set of a monster movie. I wish I still had pictures, darn. There were Jesus sticks hanging all over that place. You did notice that I wrote "stray current"? You probably got into the field after the advent of Affirmative Action when dangerous items had to be hidden away from quota hires because of the death and destruction they were capable of. "Hey, what's this big red thing for?" Here's a picture of the outside of the building, I wish I had a picture of the interior.
http://www.smdc.army.mil/smdcphoto_gallery/Kwaj/Img19_MeckIsland.jpg
TDD
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The Daring Dufas wrote:

I saw the first in the late '60s.
If you want to see an impressive power supply, visit WLW in Cincinnati, Ohio. The transmitter has multiple, large plate transformers to supply the transmitter.
We had a pair of 2 MW Westinghouse RADAR systems at Ft Rucker in the early '70s across the hall from the Weathervision office. A lot of transmitters drop the plate relays when any interlock trips. It shuts down the incoming AC line to the HV power supply, which is quickly dissipated through the final tube or tubes. Permanent sets of bleeder resistors keep the dielectric from recovering any voltage
There was nothing Affirmative Action at the stations i worked at. The TV transmitters at the AFRTS station I worked at was six feet from the control console, the processing racks directly behind the operator, and the film chain was next to the proc racks. No video tape and all in beautiful B&W.
Several radio stations had the transmitter in the control room, from the days when someone with a FCC ticket was required to be there while they were on the air. The only TV transmitter that was in a separate room was at the WACX transmitter site in Orange City. That wasn't to keep people away, but for the noise and cooling requirements. The small service area was in a room off the transmitter room, where you could barely hear what you were working on. That was a mid '80s Comark with three 65 KW Klystrons. I don't know if they modified it for DTV, or replaced it, since I haven't been to that site in 20 years.
One station I consulted with has their transmitter in the hallway leading to the studios. An old 5 KW Gates, from the '50s. A couple relay racks next to it hold the antenna and power controls for day & night power and pattern controls. A real outdated mess, but like many small stations, the owners believe that they can't afford to replace it.
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Michael A. Terrell wrote:

Did being that close to them make you sterile? *snicker* I knew this one freak who bragged about aiming his radar dish at the passing natives when he was in Nam. His goal was to cook their gonads. I wish I had been able to get into the deep space tracking radar when I was out at the missile range back in 88. One of the guys told me that it used a TWT setup and ran at upwards of 8 megawatts on VHF. When there was a mission going on, we were prohibited from using the VHF marine radio on the crew boat. It was amazing to see that huge dish move. I found a picture:
http://tinyurl.com/ybqbbz4
If you zoom in on the right side of this image you can see the big dish from a satellite:
http://www.satellite-sightseer.com/id/12134
Geez! I wish I could get back out there, I loved it. It was an amazing place.
TDD
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Michael A. Terrell wrote:

[presents]
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The Daring Dufas wrote:

That RADAR killed birds in flight and had multiple locked gates on the stairs to the antenna platform where you had to remove the key to open each gate.

TWT on VHF? VHF is 30 to 300 MHz and TWT are typically built for 300 MHz up which would put it in the 300 to 3000 MHz UHF range.
That 8 MW was a combination of antenna gain, and the fact that the transmitter operated in pulse mode.
The prohibited communications on VHF was probably for security reasons. There shouldn't be much RF on the sidelobes or rear of that antenna. BTW, Microdyne built a lot of Telemetry recievers for deep space work. In '88 they would have been building their 1100 series of modular telemetry equipment. I think the 1200 series was introduced sometime around that time, followed by the 1400, the 2800 (limited production) then the 700 & 1620 as some of the last analog models. The first DSP based models were the DR2000 & RCB 2000
<http://cgi.ebay.com/Microdyne-Telemetry-Receiver-1100-AR-W-1161-S-A-Display_W0QQitemZ370305009872QQ
NASA was still using a 30 year old Microdyne reciever to track probe satellites in 2001. It had never been turned off, or serviced.

Have you seen the big dishes used by NOAA for their LEO wearther satellites? I worked on the turnkey upgrade for their Wallops Island installation that was built by Microdyne. It replaced a 20 year old Harris microowave system and had to control their 100 foot dishes.
<http://www.photolib.noaa.gov/brs/spind10.htm has a few pictures.>
We also built the pair of tracking stations for the European Space Agency. One fixed site, and the other mobile.
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Michael A. Terrell wrote:

My bad, that ALTAIR installation is a wide band radar with what I assume are multiple feeds. I really wish I knew more about it and had been able to get in and see the operation. It's been 20 years and I remember the fellow I spoke with telling me of the enormous power of the darn thing. I do specifically remember being told that it used VHF frequencies in some modes. There is a story of it being aimed at a Russian trawler that hung around the islands. The tale speaks of the power being ramped up until smoke came out of the boat which made a quick exit from the area.
TDD

<http://cgi.ebay.com/Microdyne-Telemetry-Receiver-1100-AR-W-1161-S-A-Display_W0QQitemZ370305009872QQ
You obviously have had more experience with neater and higher power stuff than I've had. Is it OK if I envy you? *snicker*
TDD
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