A "more-liquid" clear sealant (for countertop)?


I have a new Formica-type/laminate kitchen countertop. Rather than it being a post-formed one piece construction, it is made where the backsplash is a separate piece that is glued to the countertop. It was custom made and it is made of all plywood, not particle board.
I used clear 100% silicone to seal around the top where the top of the backsplash meets the wall. But, I also want to add some sealant where the backsplash meets the countertop.
The problem I am having when I try using the clear 100% silicone is that the space where the backsplash meets the countertop is really very thin and virtually non-existent. So, the silicone doesn't actually go under the backsplash and fill the space to seal it. The best I can do is get a tiny bead into the 90-degree corner where the backsplash meets the countertop. A large bead, similar to caulking around a bathtub would look bad.
It almost seems to me that something like Superglue would work there because it would tend to be drawn in under the backsplash through capillary action and may help seal that space. But, I'm not sure I want to do that, and I'm not sure how much Superglue it would end up taking to do that.
My question is, does anyone know of any type of "thinner-than-silicone" clear sealant that may work for sealing where the backsplash meets the countertop?
Thanks.
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You should avoid having 100% silicone caulk where one of the surfaces is painted. It makes subsequent painting more problematic. You don't need silicone between a backsplash and a wall - paintable caulk is superior in that application.

Generally the backsplash should be caulked when it is installed. Simple enough to do if you're making the counter top yourself, and you just have to ask the counter top shop to do it if you're having it made.
Superglue is just about the worst thing you could possibly use - it will ruin your mica counter top finish, and it won't seal things at all.
Tape both sides of the joint with blue masking tape set about 1/8" from the joint on either side, then run a bead of clear silicone, strike it off and really push it in to the joint, smooth the bead with a finger, then scrape off everything that's on the tape to clean it off, pull the tape off at a sharp angle bending back on itself, spritz a fine mist of water with a couple drops of soap in the water on the joint, then with a finger dipped in the wet-soapy water press down the edges of the caulking bead that was lifted up when the tape was removed. The water keeps the caulk from sticking to whatever is wet. When you're done there should be hardly any caulk visible at all.
R
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wrote:

You should avoid having 100% silicone caulk where one of the surfaces is painted. It makes subsequent painting more problematic. You don't need silicone between a backsplash and a wall - paintable caulk is superior in that application.
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Thanks. I used clear on top because I thought that white would not lookright even though the walls are white. I thought the white would show a jagged edge. But, now that you mentioned tape below, I guess I could have taped the top edge and then caulked with white -- and, as you suggested, probably paintable caulk.

Tape both sides of the joint with blue masking tape set about 1/8" from the joint on either side, then run a bead of clear silicone, strike it off and really push it in to the joint, smooth the bead with a finger, then scrape off everything that's on the tape to clean it off, pull the tape off at a sharp angle bending back on itself, spritz a fine mist of water with a couple drops of soap in the water on the joint, then with a finger dipped in the wet-soapy water press down the edges of the caulking bead that was lifted up when the tape was removed. The water keeps the caulk from sticking to whatever is wet. When you're done there should be hardly any caulk visible at all.
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Thanks again. I think I'll try that. I hadn't thought about using tape. I think that may work.
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Anything with silicone on it will never seal with anything else. Plan your job accordingly.
Joe
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