A different slab for shed question

Seeing the other question got me to thinking about the shed I plan to build this summer.
My land is shale with 0-10 inches of dirt on top. I don't know, but it seems to me that shale isn't going to go anywhere, so a minimal foundation will be adequate, perhaps even less than the 4" of gravel and 4" of concrete the other guy was talking about?
My county has a policy; if you leave them alone, they leave you alone. I don't know what code requires, and I bet the building inspector doesn't either. In a neighboring county I went through a new house that had significantly less insulation than the state requirement. I called the building inspector, he looked it up and said it was news to him. I mean, geez, insulation is about as basic as it gets.
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Depends on the size of the shed and where you live. If this is for garden storage nothing heaver that 300-400 pounds. I would pour a 2-3 inch slab on 2-3 inches of ABC. You need to compact this base. home centers have manual whackers, just used one for the pad for my brothers spa. If your in a frost area the slab needs to be thick enough and deep enough on the edges/turn downs to prevent heaving. A termite spray before pouring is always a good idea if you have them. They tend to get pissed when you work the ground. The thinner the slab the more issues there are. I poured an 20x20 2 inches thick in the field and 4 inches thick around the edges. I put steel mesh in the field and one small rebar around the edge. I was hauling heavy stuff (300-400 pounds) on and off the edges so I did not want the edges to crack. Just my thoughts from the cheap seats.
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