A/C Replacment or Repair?

Soliciting some recommendations re: the following scenario
I have a Lennox A/C unit that was installed in 1994. My local HVAC technician did a leak test and identified a leak in both the interior evap coil and the outside condensing coil.
The HVAC company in question has a good reputation locally.
My system is covered by a home warranty company. The home warranty company has given me three options - 1) they will cover the cost of replacing both coils. I would only be out of pocket by my home warranty deductible. 2) should I decide to not pursue the repair option they will credit me $1000 (one thousand) toward a new unit or 3) they will pay for the installation of a refurbished non-name brand 10 SEER unit.
In all instances, I would continue to be covered by my home warranty agreement (realizing that the new until would also have some other warranty coverage.)
I am inclined to purchase the first option (repair). Suggestions would be appreciated.
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Don wrote:

How much do you use the AC? Alaska or florida?
whats the SEER of the existing unit? cost of new high seer unit.
I would take the thousand bucks and buy a brand new unit..
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Don wrote:

If it were me I'd do some serious research into option 2 and get a quote on a high seer unit. there is a federal tax credit for 2006- 07 that would soften the blow some & tax credits come off the bottom line, not just another deduction. I redid my heat / ac 2 years ago, and while the 96% furnace is cheaper to operate, the the 18 seer AC is much cheaper. I would sometimes get into the low $500s on electricity in the hot months, even at the pre-Katrina rates, I very seldom get a bill for over $400 now and the house is more livable as well. One feature I'd highly recommend is a humidistat, it will dehumidify the house by running the AC on low speed even when the temperature doesn't call for cooling. Another thing I'd recommend is an April air type filter, pricey to replace the filter @ ~$35 for just the filter element if you can do it yourself, but a much better filter with a long life of 1-2 years between changes depending on just how dusty your house is.
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Unless you live where electricity is .05 kwh and you rarely use it forget the 10seer. You have an opertunity to upgrade to 14-16 seer, if you have alot of use of the AC consider much higher Seer.
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m Ransley wrote:

Better still, actually calculate whether the higher SEER device is worth the extra money, instead of dealing in generalities.
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Soudns like the repair option will be the least expensive. I don't have any data on the efficiency, but I'd guess the cost of the new equipment will be more than the energy saving.
If you do have a real offer of a 10-seer, it's gonna have to be fast. Cause I thought the EPA requires minimum of 13 seer for any equipment made after the first of this year. So, it's not likely to find any 10 seer equipment any more.
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There's plenty of 10 SEER stuff around, at least in my town but you're right, it's disappearing as folks buy it up and the mfg's are done making it.
I'd look seriously at their offer of $1000 (is this before or after your deductible?) and upgrade. Your current units are 12 years old so other things will start breaking as well. Might just be worth it to avoid the headaches altogether and replace the units. Cheers, cc
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You must be way up north. All our 10 SEER stuff was gone before May hit.
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On Wed, 28 Jun 2006 02:48:07 GMT, "Stormin Mormon"

Of course this was "made" years ago, and refurbished at least a couple weeks (or a few months) ago. What is the EPA rule going to be about items made 5 years ago, and refurbished 5 years after the 13 seer rule goes into effect? They probably didn't say.
Or is perchance the whole rule about "installed", rather than "made"? I think you are right on that.
I didn't know they rerurbished ACs but if they do small appliances, it's probably worth it even more to do large ones.
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A lot of unknowns here. What is the climate? What is the cost of electricity? What is the deductibel the OP is out if he goes the repair route?
I'd take a look at my electric bills during AC usage months. And I'd look into possible rebates from the electric company. Many offer rebates that go up with higher SEER units. If you can get $1000 from the warranty, plus another $400 or so in additional rebate, tax incentive, etc., and you use it a reasonable amount, I'd go with replacement.
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homes are long term investments, its better to spend some bucks continiously upgrading than patch everything. eventually the save money patch falls apart and your looking at a LOT of critical broke down items and a BIG cost to replace:(
easierr and better to do a little bit at a time...
homes are investments and also where we live.
best to care for them!
Besides do it RIGHT, do it ONCE and then relax and forget about it.!!!!
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wrote:

For the record, a couple of companys got exceptions to the 13SEER ruling that Chris (Stormin) knows little to nothing about, and if you want 10SEER, all you have to do is ask a legitimate contractor that is keeping up to date with issues.
Our state made it clear on the 13SEER rule...install what you have, as long as you have it, UNLESS its new construction.
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Yesterday I heard that come 2010 not that far away the old bad for ozone layer refrigeant cant be produced anymore, illegal.
Now certinally some will be in stock.
But for a poster considering a NEW system, not being able to buy at a reasonable cost refrigeant may be a deal maker.
Whats the details on this?
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wrote:

http://www.epa.gov/Ozone/title6/phaseout/22phaseout.html
Phaseout Schedule for HCFCs Including R-22
Under the terms of the Montreal Protocol, the U.S. agreed to meet certain obligations by specific dates that will affect the residential heat pump and air-conditioning industry:
January 1, 2004: In accordance with the terms of the Montreal Protocol, the amount of all HCFCs that can be produced nationwide must be reduced by 35% by 2004. In order to achieve this goal, the U.S. is ceasing production of HCFC-141b, the most ozone-damaging of this class of chemicals, on January 1, 2003. This production ban will greatly reduce nationwide use of HCFCs as a group, making it likely that the 2004 deadline will have a minimal effect on R-22 supplies.
January 1, 2010: After 2010, chemical manufacturers may still produce R-22 to service existing equipment, but not for use in new equipment. As a result, heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) system manufacturers will only be able to use pre-existing supplies of R-22 to produce new air conditioners and heat pumps. These existing supplies would include R-22 recovered from existing equipment and recycled.
January 1, 2020: Use of existing refrigerant, including refrigerant that has been recovered and recycled, will be allowed beyond 2020 to service existing systems, but chemical manufacturers will no longer be able to produce R-22 to service existing air conditioners and heat pumps.
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2020...not 2010.

Its all over, but there is no such thing as a cheap refrigerant now. R22 has almost doubled in price, and 410a has gone up at least 25% in the last couple of weeks.

R22 is still the cheapest, and will be for years....prob till the new R22 system he installs today, is ready for replacement.

Al posted it, and its correct.
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