A/C Keep Blowing 3 Amp Fuse

So my home a/c keep blowing 3 amp fuses. it throw code 24 which means secondary voltage fuse. all the wires inside the a/c unit looks okay. when i go outside to the unit itself i see some wires that are opposed. i took a flat head to spread the wires apart but still blowing fuses.where or how should i repair those wires? can i get a kit or what?
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On Mon, 18 Jun 2007 22:01:44 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Room AC? Central AC? What brand? What model? How old?
Where is the fuse? In the fuse box or in the AC? If the AC, which half? Do you have the owners manual. My friend had half of it, but there was another volume stuffed in the condenser box. The second half had a basic wiring diagram that showed a fuse within the AC.
Where is your fuse?

Opposed to what? Abortion?

Did you turn off the fuse or circuit breaker before you did this? There is probably a circuit breaker or a removable connector in a grey metal box near the outside AC. Did you turn it off/remove it? If not, there are two circuit breakers in the house for most AC's. One for the furnace part and one for the outside. Turn them both off.

We don't yet know that the wires are the problem.
Are they actually touching each other? Are they suppposed to touch each other? That is, do they both slide onto tabs that are connected to each other further down. Many AC connectors are like U's, with a wire connecting to each prong of the U. Use a flashlight and a magnifiying glass if you have to.
Do you have a meter? Have you measure the AC voltage between these two places (with the breakers on. BE careful, it may well be 220 volts, enough to kill you.)
It seems unlikely to me that if the AC used to work -- Did it? -- that wires that weren't touching each other are suddenly touching each other.
It's probably something else.

Kits are usually a box of parts. We don't even know what's broken yet.
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wrote:

I ask this because the 3 amp fuse that blew is not the fuse that controls the 240 volts to the outside unit. Your AC uses much more than 3 amps outside, and if a 3 amp fuse broke, it is just in the control circuit, that powers the thermostat and the control of the AC, including turning the compressor on and off. But even if that power is gone, the 220 volts AC will still be there, and that can kill you.
If the 220 volts were on and you used a flat head to spread the wires apart and there were no sparks or melting metal, iincluding the screw driver, the two wires were probably at the same voltage and probably connected to each other directly or indirectly.
If you dind't have sense enought to turn the 240 off before doing this, you better damn well read some books and learn more before you kill yourself. Or just stay away from 220 and 240 until you learn what you're doing, and hope you don't kill yourself on 110. (which is possible but harder to do.)
If you did turn the 220 power off before doing this, you should have also measured the resistance between the two places after trying to separate them. If it was zero, then they were meant to be connected. It's unlikely enough that they would suddenly touch each other, but much less likely that you couldn't separate them if they were meant to be apart.

Or the voltage may be zero volts AC between them, if they are supposed to be connected together.
The control voltage is 24 volts AC. That's probably whatn the 3 amp fuse is for. Turn off all the fuses and look for a short in the 24 volts circuit. You can't see electricity. Use an ohmmeter, part of a multimeter, or VOM.
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: >Did you turn off the fuse or circuit breaker before you did this? : : I ask this because the 3 amp fuse that blew is not the fuse that : controls the 240 volts to the outside unit.
CY: I suspect it is, if indirectly. I suspect the 3 amp fuse is on the circuit that does several things -- including control the 240 volts to the outside unit.
Your AC uses much more : than 3 amps outside, and if a 3 amp fuse broke, it is just in the : control circuit, that powers the thermostat and the control of the AC, : including turning the compressor on and off. But even if that power : is gone, the 220 volts AC will still be there, and that can kill you.
CY: Which is it? Controls the 220 VAC or not? Yes, the 220 volt power can be there even though the 3 amp fuse is blown or missing.
: : If the 220 volts were on and you used a flat head to spread the wires : apart and there were no sparks or melting metal, iincluding the screw : driver, the two wires were probably at the same voltage and probably : connected to each other directly or indirectly.
CY: Or the metal screw driver blew the 3 amp fuse.
: : If you dind't have sense enought to turn the 240 off before doing : this, you better damn well read some books and learn more before you : kill yourself. Or just stay away from 220 and 240 until you learn : what you're doing, and hope you don't kill yourself on 110. (which is : possible but harder to do.)
CY: Or, maybe figure out which wire he means?
: : If you did turn the 220 power off before doing this, you should have : also measured the resistance between the two places after trying to : separate them. If it was zero, then they were meant to be connected. : It's unlikely enough that they would suddenly touch each other, but : much less likely that you couldn't separate them if they were meant to : be apart. : : >There is probably a circuit breaker or a removable connector in a grey : >metal box near the outside AC. Did you turn it off/remove it? If : >not, there are two circuit breakers in the house for most AC's. One : >for the furnace part and one for the outside. Turn them both off. : :
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On Tue, 19 Jun 2007 09:11:37 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"

Here I was thinking that it wasn't the fuse in the actual 240 volts circuit. That's what I was referring to.
Below I started thinking about the control circuit.
A mistake for me to use "controls" both times.

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On Mon, 18 Jun 2007 22:01:44 -0700, tommyt85 wrote:

check the 24 volt transformer, just a wild guess.
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Yep, that was wild.
--

Christopher A. Young
You can\'t shout down a troll.
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On Tue, 19 Jun 2007 09:12:00 -0400, Stormin Mormon wrote:

I thought so too, that's why I typed it.
I gues the OP should just call the hvac dude like you suggested.
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Hi, I read your problem and I think I can help. Is that 3 amp fuse located inside the furnace or outside in the condenser?
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I'd suggest to call a HVAC repair company and have them come out and fix it.
--

Christopher A. Young
You can\'t shout down a troll.
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From your post, I doubt you know enough to do serious troubleshooting. Time to call a pro.
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your 24 volt control wire is shorting somewhere.If the insulation is missing anywhere on the low voltage control wire it will pop the small fuse.Mine was a blade type like in a car.I pulled a new control wire and cured the problem on mine.
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