A/C for high humidity / lower temperatures situation

Hi there ...
Say ... just bought a condo not too long ago in a kind of bizarre area ...
It's in the back of the building near a pretty decent sized thatch of trees.
It stays cool back there. If you turn everything off and just let it sit, it hardly gets to 80 when it is in the mid '90's outside.
Problem ... when it is in the high '70's or low '80's and a billion percent humidity (as it often is here), the compressor simply doesn't run enough to pull out much water.
Already checked that it has the smallest unit available (1.5 ton).
Question ... I have been doing some reading that there are units now that have variable speed fans and humidity sensing thermostats in the like.
Question ... do they come that small and ...
Two ... has anyone here had any luck with such a thing?
Thanks!
Ax
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I would go to the local dehumidifier store and purchase one. Then run it in conjunction with the a/c. Unless of course your just set on spending a bunch of money.
You might check your air handler fan and see if it is set on high, then lower it to medium. The compressor will run longer, and take out more humidity. Have you had the unit checked recently? Non dehumidification can be a sign of other problems.
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Yes ... I got a dehuidifier ... does a bang up job ... only one problem is that I don't have the space (or the outlets) to set the thing up in a place where I can drain it ... meaning I have to manually empty the bucket once or twice a day and kill my poor back. So I was hoping to find a more permanent solution.

Yes ... unfortunately I have only one blower speed on this unit ... was hoping to see if someone out there maybe is in similar conditions ... back in the woods maybe where it stays really cool but really damp and has moved to a two-speed unit and had some luck.
Yep ... have had the unit checked out ... it is clean and has 20 degrees of drop, so it appears to be working the way it was designed.
It only runs on maybe a 40 percent duty cycle though around 80 degrees so the moisture just builds up and builds up.
Ax
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Too late now, but a smaller unit may do a better job as it would run longer.
Many years ago, in an industrial application in a printing plant, humidity control was more important than air temperature. This company would run the heat on damp cool days to force the AC to run and take out humidity. Works, but is expensive.
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dehumidifier
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Axinar wrote:

Perhaps you can change the pulleys on the air handler to slow it down.
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