A/C drain line plugged, what to clear it with?

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So draino crystals sink to the blockage and do their magic but liquid plumber is only effective if there is some flow--is that what you're trying to convey. I think that the makers of Liquid Plumber would take issue with you----apparently you've never seen the liquid plumber TV commercials--very dramatic how it works so nicely. I had a completely blocked condensate line--water in the pan almost to the top of it. Several hours after I put in the bleach solution the pan was empty and the water that I put into it ran freely to the outside drain. I guess you're one of the "My mind is made up, don't confuse me with facts" types.
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Oren used improper usenet message composition style by unnecessarily full-quoting:

(attach a shop-vac to the end of the condensate line)
Yea, I'm not one of those "sane" Canadians - that would suggest something other than a crazy-ass bleach method to clear the condensate line, like maybe blow the line with an air compressor.
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Oren wrote:

What kind of moron puts an air-conditioner inside a 100+ F attic?
And even if it was in the attic - your condensate line would run *out* of the attic, to a place where it could drain -> AND be more accessible than the condensate pan.

Even if your A/C unit is inside the attic?
So you're telling me that blasting some compressed air into the end of the drain line is *harder* than crawling into an attic, dis-assembling the plenum or taking a cover-plate off, and shoe-horning some bleach into the drain pan?

So that makes you an expert in how to clear a blocked line?

I really want a logical, rational explanation as to why it's more ergonomic to pour bleach into the drain pan vs blowing compressed air into the line from the accessible exit-point of the line. Sticking a shop-vac into the end of the line and pulling the junk out is also a good idea and worth a try way before the bleach-in-the-pan idea.

I have listened, and I have pointed out what I think are real functional issues as to why the "draino" method has problems.
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Oren wrote:

Then tell us what part of your hvac system is in the attic.
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Oren wrote:

Well no shit sherlock.
That includes your evap coil, the plenum and the condensation pan.
Which if you ask me, it's moronic to put any HVAC components inside an attic. Much harder to thermally insulate it. A very inefficiant location for a lot of reasons (access, noise and vibration, etc).
But beyond that, again your making the case that if the drain line is plugged, then it's more ergonomic to use a bleach solution in the pan - vs blowing out the line from it's exterior exit location? How exactly do you rationalize that?
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HomelessGuy has great difficulty visualizing anything beyond his little cardboard box. He can't imagine large two story homes where it's not at all unusal to find one HVAC unit in the attic, one in the basement. Is it the ideal situation? No. But a lot of the above is pure nonsense.
EG: noise, vibration - Haven't been around a modern HVAC unit apparently.
Access? Crawl into attic? - I walk into mine

If I were to do the bleach method, I'd grab the bleach from the laundry room, mix it with some water in a pot, walk upstairs and into the attic and pour.
Blowing it out, I'd back the car out, move the lawn mower, roll out the air compressor, find the nozzle for it, wheel it around the house, get an extension cord, plug it in, uncoil the air hose. And then I'd have to figure out how to get the end of the air hose connected to the condensate line And then I'd have to start cutting pipe because the condensate line runs inside the house down to the basement where it joins the line from the basement furnace. So the exiting end of the condensate line isn't even directly available.
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" snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net" wrote:

An obtuse observation based on the conversation thus far.

An HVAC in the attic is still not the best place for it - from a thermodynamic point of view if nothing else.

So you agree with me about that.

What - they don't have motors or fans or moving parts in them any more?
Really?
Tell us more.

So now everyone that has an hvac in their attic, according to you, has (a) a large, 2-story house (with a furnace in the basement and a furnace in the attic) and also (b) a large, walk-in attic.
I see. What a nice world you live in.

So your condensate pan requires no tools to access? It's right there- out in the open?
I see.
And you are garanteed that the beach will work?

(...)
I'd charge up my 5-gallon portable tank, connect air-hose and trigger-operated air gun, carry it down to basement furnace, shove nozzle of air-gun into 1/2" copper condensate line and wrap my hand around the end of the line to form a good-enough seal, pull trigger, remove air gun and observe water flowing out of line and into drain.
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It's the best place for it for floorspace and duct layout.

Neither is the middle of the floor, the best place. Everything is a tradeoff. However, it's a *very* common place to put the EVAC unit in the South.

You no longer have to convince us just how stupid you are. We got it!

Most houses here have large attics. 12:12 is minimum in many places. My VT house is 15:12. DOn't know what it is in this house (haven't measure it - haven't even been in the attic yet). Yes, it's rather easy to walk around in the attic. It's a huge cavern up there.
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Home Guy wrote:

A. Nobody asked you.
B. Millions upon millions of homes can't all be wrong.
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HeyBub wrote:

What?
Millions of homes in the USA have their HVAC unit in the attic?
I still say it's a crazy-ass place to put it.
http://accurateinspection.com/attic_ductwork.htm
===================Ductwork in an attic is normally the largest energy problem in the home or building.
The reasons why this practice should be avoided are comfort complaints, heating & cooling losses in the attic ductwork and air handler, higher energy bills, maintenance difficulties and system failures.
Most HVAC contractors install cooling systems in the attic based on the theory that cold air falls down. =================== Really?
What a retarded theory.
Maybe they mean most American HVAC contractors install cooling systems in the attic for that cockamamee reason.
===================However, the real reason most of them install them in the attic, is that it is a lot easier and less expensive to install the system. there are a number of problems with this type of installation:
ATTIC AIR HANDLER and DUCTWORK PROBLEMS:
1. The attic air handler and ductwork system is normally insulated to R-4 and is installed above the attic insulation causing minimal resistance to heat and cooling losses through the ductwork and air handler.
2. The size and cost of the system will have to be increased due to the cooling and heating losses through the thinner attic ductwork insulation. A larger system will be required to compensate for this inefficiency.
3. The systems will have to run longer to make up for the losses in the attic ductwork.
4. There is also inefficiency, due to the fact that the cooling system is generating cooling in the hottest part of the house and the heating system is generating heat in the coldest part of the house in the winter.
5. On a typical attic installation the temperature differential from the attic air handler unit to the supply register on the other side of the house can be as much as 8 degrees. This amount of cooling loss cannot be made up with just over sizing the system.
6. Additionally, most attic access doors/hatches are not insulated which will allow more winter heat to escape up into the attic.
7. The attic heat in the summer time will also migrate down into the house through the ducts and attic access, making the system have to run longer to cool the warmer air.
8. This design is very wasteful in the winter. The house heat will rise up by stack effect into the supply and return ducts in the winter, making the 10 inches of attic insulation mostly ineffective. This air will flow into attic ducts and air handler to be lost through the thinner insulation and leakage points in the ductwork.
9. The heating system will have to recycle on and off more often to make up for this stack loss.
10. Delivery duct leakage into attics increases the cost of operation because the system has to run longer to make up for the leakage lost to the attic.
11. Return duct leaks allow frigid winter air to be introduced into the system, increasing the heating load.
12. Return duct leakage in the summer pulls very hot humid air into the system, increasing cooling and dehumidification loads.
MAINTENANCE DIFFICULTIES:
In many attics the air handler system is installed in the corner, sometimes behind the supply and return ductwork. The only way to get to the filter for regular cleaning or replacement (monthly) is to climb over the ductwork, sometimes damaging the ducts. Most homeowners dont even go into the attic to change the filter, even if the air handler is easy to access. Because of this hard to access filter, most filters are not changed on a regular basis, causing the filter and cooling coil to become dirty and clogged, reducing the efficiency and air circulation of the already inefficient system. The house will have increased operational costs and the furthest rooms from the air handler will not be cooled or heated efficiently or adequately. =================================== Up here in Canada, we don't do crazy-ass things like put hvac units in our attics.
So what do we know about Americans so far?
1) They think it's normal to urinate in the sink - if only because it's more conveinent (remember my thread about installing urinals for residential use?) and
2) They think it's normal (even preferrable) to put the ac/furnace in the attic.
Oh yea:
3) Almost half of all americans with mortgages are under water (financially speaking - although many of you like to build homes on flood plains).
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Yes, that's what people have been telling you but you're too stupid to understand.

It's not.
<Diahreah of the keyboard snipped>
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" snipped-for-privacy@att.biz" wrote:

<krw head inserted into sand>
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HomoGuy;s head inserted in his (and anyone who will bend over's) ass.
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They sure do. Maybe that's because contrary to your notions, the USA is a country where a lot of people have big houses. And when you have a big, two story house, it's not unusual to have two HVAC units. One in the basement, one in the attic.

That's probably the best reason I've heard yet to put it in the attic.

Right there it's clear whoever wrote this doesn't know much about HVAC. That reason is about the dumbest I've heard.

Your the one citing it as a reference, not us.

I thought right above it's claimed that the main reason is that cold air fall down....

The above points are valid. Unfortunately, there is no mention of the positive reasons for putting HVAC in the attic.

Of course this one is flat out wrong. If X BTUs are lost in the attic, then off course you can increase the size of the system to make up for it.

Which of course has nothing to do with the topic.

Those are true.

Repeating now.

And if the air leaks out into an unfinished basement pretty much the same thing happens.

True, but then the leaks should be sealed.

True, but then the leaks should be sealed.

You could do a bad install anywhere.

You could do a bad install anywhere. The houses I've seen it done in access isn't a problem.

Then those homeowners probably won't change the filter if it;s in the basement either.

It probably causes smelly feet and cancer too.
What is missing in all this is a fair comparison with the other alternatives. In a large two story house the attic is a convenient place. It provides a space close to the area served and it's very easy to run the duct work. I've never seen an attic unit as the only unit in the house. One unit is in the basement, one in the attic. How do they do HVAC for a 4000 square foot house in Canada?
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" snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz" wrote:

How does discussing *where* the hvac system is located in a house have anything to do with "knowing" about AC?
What a twisted thought-process you have to make such a statement.
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You obviously know little about the art.

Wow! You complaining about a "twisted thought-process". Now *THAT'S* funny!
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The way you ask questions, deserves a hefty kick in the but.
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MLD full-quoted:

If there is ZERO flow, then what-ever you're adding to perform a chemical reaction with (or near) the blocking material must get close to the blocking material - or be in direct contact with the blocking material.
If I have a sink full of water, and the sink drain is completely blocked, then how effective do you think it will be to add a liquid to the sink water?

Liquid plumber is a dense liquid that (like the draino crystals) will sink down through the water and into the drain.

Normally, the condensate pan is hard to access in most furnaces / AC systems.
Your blockage must have been near the outlet where the pan is connected to the condensate line. If the line was blocked further down, it would have taken much longer (if at all) for the bleach to clear the line.
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SNIP>>

How about cutout in the plenum right above the drain pan-I can reach in and touch the bottom of the pan. Used to be a humidifier there, now a piece of sheet metal covers the hole providing an easy access when ever I need it. Boy--you must be miserable to be with in a car if you ever run into a road block or detour. You're not going to move because this is the way you always go and that's it!!
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On Jun 2, 7:10pm, "Stormin Mormon"

From a call to Chlorox, cut at LEAST 4:1
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