A/C Condenser Coil ... dripping pan

The indoor A/C system we have is installed in the hallway of our home. The coil/pan is dripping water and soaking the carpet. A few years ago we funneled bleach water in and drained it out. It cleared out the sludge and seemed to drain well over the next few years. We tried doing the same thing again but the water mix just runs over the inside but not back out through the funneled tube when let down. Question 1: It looks like the pan is somehow attached to the cooling coil frame. Does anyone know if this can be easily replaced or repaired? Question 2: If it needs to be replaced, can someone give me some idea as to the average cost of just replacing the cooling coil and pan as opposed to replacing the entire A/C unit? I mean the indoor portion...the outdoor blower is new. Thanks!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Find the drain. It is plugged and has to be opened up. Run a wire or snake down the draina nd problem is gone.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That was the first thing I did. Funneled a little warm bleach water and poked with a guitar string into the pan. The solution just spilled over before I could bring the tube back down. Warm water solution flowed fine down the copper pipe which goes to a sink drain. Pan is probaby just shot.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I don't understand. The pan is designed to hold water and send it to a drain. If it is holding water, that part of the pan is doing its job. The drain, evidently, is not. These things plug easily from the dust and stuff that accumulates in it. Empty the pan with a cup, scoop, or turkey baster. Find the drain. Properly clear the drain. It will take more than hot water and a guitar string. It may take a small plumber snake to reach the end and open it up completely.
If the pan is not leaking, it is doing what it was designed to do. The drain, not the pan, is the problem. Fix it properly, maintain it during the year, it will work as it should.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote in

On the front of the pan is a metal pipe about 3" long. Attached is rubber tubing for about 9" which is attached to copper tubing that goes for several feet to drain into a bathroom sink pipe. From that top part of the drain assemply to the sink everything flows fine. Where it appears blocked is going into the pan from that front pipe. This is where I poked a guitar string last time and it loosened the crud and drained a bunch out. I tried this because it looks like someone built the pan (welded) it into the old 1972 unit and I didn't see any other way to get to it. The pan is now overflowing and dripping onto the interior of everything below including the blower. We have square buckets gathering the water until someone can come out and take a look at it but it'll have to be after holiday. I'm trying not to run it too much but it can get hell degrees quickly in TX. Thanks much for the info and reply!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Evidently there is some serious buildup at the tube inlet. Loosening it with a thin wire will push it out of the way a little, but it may float right back. Do you have a wet/dry vac? If so, try to suck out the crud since it is only a new inches. Alternatively, put a thinner tube inside and it may drain into the bucket. Plastic tubing would work for that. You may be able to push it past the clog.
If you can get that wet vac into the pan, it may clear it all out.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Sol Rosenberg wrote:

If you have a plugged line, I recommend using an air compressor to blow out the line, followed with a Clorox flush. I did this every year with the two we had in NC, and it worked great. You can access either end of the line- whichever is easier.
Nonnymus
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Nonnymus wrote:

While that's true, if given a choice, choose to blow away from the coil. Otherwise, you can have a mess to clean up.
--
The e-mail address in our reply-to line is reversed in an attempt to
minimize spam. Our true address is of the form snipped-for-privacy@prodigy.net.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
CJT wrote:

Thanks for pointing this out. You are right. In my own case, the pans are in the upstairs attic, where the drains are right outside the garage door. My choice is simple. <Grin>
Nonnymus
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Sol Rosenberg wrote:

If you're talking about the overflow catcher....
My pan went shot a couple of years ago. Evidently these things are made ad hoc by the A/C installers.
Got a washing machine base from HD. This is a big (~3'x3') heavy, plastic pan designed to fit beneath a washing machine. It has pop-out holes so overflow from the washer can be piped to a drain.
Anway, I replaced the tin pan for the A/C with this thing, using strapping material to get it to hang properly, hooked up some pipes, and never looked back.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You better look back. The pan may last 100 years. The problem is usually caused by the drain plugging. There is no force to wash down the crud that sometimes gets in them and the pan fills and overflows. Be sure it is clean and water flows freely.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.