A/C condensation problem

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Anyone have experience in fixing built-in A/C condensation issues? I have to lay down towels on the carpet next to the A/C cabinet to soak up the moisture from the A/C cabinet. I've never worked on built-in A/C, so I know very little in this area. Maybe if I can learn how these systems work, I can save some money.
Thanks!
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On 2015-09-07 8:11 PM, Eagle wrote:

Hey fucknozzle, built in? Window or central air, if window, slope it correctly, if central you need a drain, it may be clogged.
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Froz...

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alt.home.repair on Mon, 7 Sep 2015 20:27:42 -0400 *gasp!*:

Where can I buy me one of them fucknozzles?
:)
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I haven't lost my mind, it's backed up on disk somewhere.

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On 9/7/2015 8:35 PM, Sycho wrote:

I was born with one.
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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On 09/07/2015 08:27 PM, FrozenNorth wrote:

[snipped for clarity]

Hey fucknozzle, did you read the first sentence? What part of "built-in" zoomed over your head?
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On 2015-09-07 8:55 PM, Hot Pipe wrote:

Eagle and I have problems from other groups, I gave him an answer, I have never heard the term "built-in" used for HVAC equipment.
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Froz...

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On 9/7/2015 8:27 PM, FrozenNorth wrote:

At this point, sounds like he might need to open the evaporator coil cabinet. Bend the long tip on a fucknozzle, and blow it out.
But, it's too early to tell.
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Stormin Mormon explained on 9/7/2015 :

That's close to what I'm seeing as well as thinking that is what is needed. There is a white PVC pipe exiting the evaporator coil cabinet with an opening at the top and exiting the A/C cabinet. The cabinet is taped closed with 2" duct tape, and most of the moisture is leaking from a taped corner of the condenser coil cabinet. Would a vacuum type fucknozzle tool be useful in this area, or close by? How about a few pics of the area? :D
http://postimg.org/image/qlboznsf3/
http://postimg.org/image/oxn8x1tzp/
Play nice, frosty... lol
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On Tuesday, September 8, 2015 at 8:41:57 AM UTC-4, Eagle wrote:

When you said built-in AC in the original post, I took that to mean a self-contained AC unit installed through a hole in the wall. What you have would commonly be referred to as central AC. If the water is leaking at the bottom corner, its probably because the drain line is clogged. You could try using a vac to suck it out. It would also be easy to just cut it, clear it, then replace pieces with new and reconnect it.
That second fitting that is capped is the emergency drain. It's slightly higher than the normal one and use to provide an optional second route if the first gets clogged. It would normally be routed to a basement floor or similar, where it would be noticed, but not do damage, etc.
The other possibility is that plenum is uninsulated and if it's in a high humidity area, it can get cold enough that condensation forms on it, then runs down. But that should be obvious and sounds like your problem is a plugged drain. Where does drain go and is any water coming out?
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trader_4 submitted this idea :

The drain goes outside, but the water is showing up in the hallway. That led Me to the A/C cabinet right next to the wet carpet area. I'll work on this today when I get time. I have to refi a house I inherited in Sun City today, so that will keep Me busy most of the day. Thanks!
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On 9/8/2015 8:41 AM, Eagle wrote:

Not enough information in your picture. We now know it's a 70% efficiency furnace, probably natural gas. There should be a white drain line from the pan. If there is a tee coupling and open top tube, try some hot water from the sink, mix in a splash of bleach. Pour into the top of the open tube with a funnel. Some times hot and bleach will clear a drain line.
If that doesn't do the trick, I'd be tempted to use a wet type shop vac with a fucknozzle. Vacuum for thirty seconds or so at the open top white PVC tube. Wrap a rag or your hand around the fucknozzle, so all the vacuum goes into the white PVC tube.
It's OK to use the fucknozzle, and then pour hot water and bleach after vacuuming.
Please let us know how this works, for you.
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.
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Eagle wrote:

Ignore the rudedude ... what's probably happened is that the condensate drain pipe has clogged . There is an algae that loves that temp ... and it forms a plug about the consistency of Jello . The cure is to blow the offending algae plug out with compressed air . Best to do it from the inside , if you can find and disconnect that pipe from the evaporator coil . If it dumps the condensate into the drain system you don't really have a choice ... if it drains outside the house you can blow it back into the drain pan , but it's gonna make a mess . Pouring a couple of ounces of clorine bleach down the drain pipe a couple of times a year will help keep that problem from coming back .
--
Snag



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In alt.home.repair, on Mon, 7 Sep 2015 20:03:22 -0500, "Terry Coombs"

I haven't the slightest doubt that you are right most of the time. maybe all the time except for me!
My AC worked just fine for about 10 years. Then water started coming out all over th floor (cement floor, no carpet.)

I didn't have compressed air so I used my mouth. It didn't seem plugged to me. So I ran some garden hose from the laundry sink and pourted that down the pipe, and it just poured out the other end (which was where the sump pump was) as fast as I was pouring it in.
So I figured it was not clogged now so I had unclogged it. And I put it back togehter.

(There had been no good way to disconnect it so I'd sawn through the white plastic pipe (not PEX, before PEX. ABS or something) Then I used some sort of connector to put it back together.
But it still leaked all over the floor, just like before. Remember that it worked fine the first 10 years I was here, and probably the 4 years before I got here.
Let me explain more. The pipe came from the condensor pan out 2 inches, down 4 inches, acroos 20 inches to the wall, down the wall to the floor, along the floor to near the sump, sideways a foot to the sump, where it drained.
What I ended up doing is rearranging the pipes, so instead of going down 4 inches at the start, it went down 15 inches, then across to the wall, down the wall, along the floor to near the sump and sideways to the sump. And it never spilled on the floor again!! (And I used the same pipes, just rearranged them, and hadn't done any additional unclogging.)
I can see why it works better this way, with the long drop early in the pipe but I can't figure it out why it stopped working the other way. I should have made an effort to look at some of the other 100 houses here built together, which might have had the same pipes arrangement. By now almost all the ACs have been replaced.

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micky pretended :

Thanks Micky! This is good info for any future problems with My A/C. I traced the drain pipe to the ouside stucco wall where the drain was covered in concrete where the new concrete deck was poured. At first I thought this is where it is plugged, but it has worked fine for 22 years, so why was the drain covered by concrete to begin with? Anyway, it's time to change the towel over lake hallway. Thanks again Micky!
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!

If the pipe is outside , try a shop vacuum in the liquid mode and try to suck it out.
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Ralph Mowery wrote:

Somebody else suggested that , and I think it's a great idea !
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Uncle Monster explained on 9/8/2015 :

Thanks Monster Man!
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Ralph Mowery formulated the question :

I will. I have a vacuum tool that will work in this case. Thanks!
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On 9/8/2015 9:06 AM, Eagle wrote:

I saw your second photo, which viewed the white PVC.
Even more ideal than fucknozzle on the top of the open PVC, a good fucknozzle on the far end of the white PVC (where it goes into the drain) is great idea.
And an ounce or two of pool chlorine in the top open end is a good idea. Use a fuckfunnel.
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Stormin Mormon laid this down on his screen :

Good idea Stormy. Maybe a friend will drop off a fuckfunnel at My door today like the fucknozzle was?
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