A/C condensate drain

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HeyBub wrote:

And at least in jurisdictions I've been there's a very definite difference in code application in residential vis a vis commercial/manufacturing environment.
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HeyBub wrote:

Your right but what happens during the winter? The P-trap dries out and now you can suck in sewer gases. Some times you can get away with running your condensate line into a vent pipe when you have a small pressure valve that keeps your P-trap full of water.
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Moe Jones
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Moe Jones wrote:

That doesn't apply if the condensate drips into free air space before trickling into the sewer drain. In fact, it can help ensure that a seldom used drain trap doesn't run dry.
I know of an instance in an office building where a return air plenum access panel was inadvertently left open, creating negative air pressure in a fan room where the floor drain trap was dry. The result was sewer gas being distributed throughout the building. Phew! That might not have happened if condensate was going down that drain (and if the HVAC tech was more conscientious).
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<snip>
Huh. The condensation drain--the visible part---starts as a couple-inch long piece of pipe projecting horizontally out of the AC unit (which itself is on top of the furnace). But very close nearby there _is_ a second, similar projection, but that's capped off.
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