A/C condensate drain

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I need to get my A/C condensate drain/line fixed. (This is in an older home I just purchased.)
The problem the home inspector pointed out was that it drains into the same pipe that the clothes washer does.
Also, the other day the A/C was running, and water was dripping over the furnace from the line. One joint was leaking, and also the line isn't sloped enough to allow for proper drainage.
I've got some questions: (1) Is it true that this is work for an A/C guy, not a plumber? I called a plumber, and he didn't want to do the work and said call an A/C guy. I'm asking, because at least where I live, it seems like many A/C guys are one- or two-person shops that are hard to get ahold of (and might not even have an office). (2) The plumber also said that the way the A/C condensate line/drain should work is that it goes to the floor, and then some pump pumps it out of the house through a line going through the basement wall. While I can see that the current setup is dumb (condensate can't really drip into pipe when the hose from the washer is in place), is it true that someone can't just add another "branch" to the PVC pipe the washer is draining into, and have the condensate drain go into that? I guess maybe that's not such a hot idea, since maybe the stuff coming out of the water is under some pressure, but the whole business of drilling a hole through the basement wall sounds like a lot of work.
TIA,
S
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IMO, neither as they are both skilled and expensive. This can be done by a hanyman type of person. Or do it yourself.

Very often done that way. Since I can't see your setup I can't say that is the best way.
While I can see that

Should work.
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Except I'm not sure what code may say about piping it into the sanitary sewer or septic system. For example, in many areas, code won't allow you to put sump pump water into the sanitary sewer. Not sure if there is any similar restriction on AC condensate. By far most common is to just have it piped outside via some flexible tubing. As Edwin pointed out, in most cases not hard at all to drill a hole, but it does depend on what the construction is. If it's wood frame construction, it's easy, if solid brick, then it's a different story, but though harder can be done.
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wrote in message

House is brick. (Home inspector said it's "brick veneer" when I asked him for more detailed description for online home insurance application forms.)
But this is in the basement. Another, thicker line for exhaust from the clothes dryer goes out---through cinder blocks, it looks like.
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If the inside coil high enough the condensate can go to a drain with trap. That "looks good" but the trap will almost certain dry out in the winter.
OTOH, if the condensate goes to the basement floor drain, it will help keep that trap "wet".

Since you should have a trap on any connection to the sewer, it makes more sense to have the outlet of the condensate pump go to the SAME place was the washer drain. The outlet tube from the condensate pump on the order of 1/2" (or slightly more) diameter. It can easily co-exist with the washer drain. When the condensate pump kicks in, it will deliver about 1/2 gallon of water in 30 seconds. The washing machine will deliver 10 to 20 gallons in less than a minute. As long as the condensate outlet can "fit" it just isn't a problem.

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Yeah, that's what I was thinking---the washer drain pipe is already trapped.

OK, thanks, that's good to know.

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Home Depot and Lowes sell condensate sump pumbs for around $50. You use flexible tube to route the condensate outstide. The sump is built into the pump.

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sinister wrote:

Try to see if you have a Handyman in your area. I would say that most of them can do what ever you need. If you want to do yourself then call the city inspector and ask them want you need to do. They will also come out to your location to check the job to make sure it is up to code.
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sinister wrote:

I'd vote for neither in preference to anyone whose hand fits a screwdriver.

Around here, the condensate drains into the closest sanitary sewer stack. There's no "pressure" involved. I would think that A/C condensate can drain into whatever is the most convenient. That includes a branch of the washer drain or even outside.
Beware, however, there are usually TWO condensate drains: one for the condensate itself and one for the pan under the evaporating unit. The latter is the fail-safe for when the 1st drain gets clogged.
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I had a wet area in the lawn where the A/C condensate drained. Using PVC pipe, I directed the drain into the gutter down spout. I painted the PVC pipe black. No more soggy ground.
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around here the condensate drain pump picks up both heating and AC watewr sends to sanitary sewer, in my old house the washing machine drain. it passed 2 home inspections and review by the sewer company who looked at it...
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Same where I live now.
HOWEVER, when I lived near Pittsburgh (Western PA) more than 10 years ago this was a BIG DEAL; A/C condense SHALL NOT enter the sewer system back then. There were specifications on how to dig and fill a "dry well" outside the house. It had to be so deep, so wide, filled with rocks and pebbles (sized specified) and covered with so much dirt and grass. And the PVC pipe ran outside and down into the dry well.
Where you live does make a difference in such little things as that.
Phil
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After a couple people made similar comments, and seeing similar stuff on the web, I managed to find the piece of code for my locality (Montgomery County, MD). Turns out you're not allowed to discharge AC condensate into the sanitary sewer system.

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sinister wrote:

It is not allowed because if the drain goes dry then you could suck sewer gases into your home.
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Moe Jones wrote:

Which can be handled by a p-trap on the condensate drain. Like on mine.
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HeyBub wrote:

Yep.
I think the proscription is simply to keep water not needing treatment out of municipal sewage systems to hold down the volume needing treatment. Not a major amount in comparison to other sources, but it would add up if everybody did so...
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dpb wrote:

But, but, but, the alternative!
Everybody in a subdivision has to connect to the STORM SEWER? Or dump to the street?
Think of the plumbing costs.
No, since now everyone is using the low-flow toilets, there should be enough unused, extra capacity at the waste water treatment plants to handle a quart of (very pure) water per house per day.
Heck, the city might even have to use less chemicals and stuff.
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HeyBub wrote: ...

...
No, keep it on lot...
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No, I don't think that's the reason. This is a technical definition problem, at least in the jurdisdictions where I've worked.
Condensate from any source is "non contact process water" and process water is not allowed into a sanitary sewer (or storm sewer, for that matter) without going through an industrial pretreatment first.
I don't think you're going to get around that with the building inspector, though you and he both know it's kind of silly in this case.
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TimR wrote:

Isn't that backwards? What understandable references I find to "non contact process water" (as in condensate from cooling towers) imply that it is essentially pure water and should be protected from contaminants, not the reverse.
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