a/c compressor burned out?

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My a/c quit working, no cool air. About a year ago a repairman did something with a switch in the attic that he said would normally be replaced at a cost of $150 or so but that it really wasn't necessary. He has a good rep and no reason to have me spend less.
Nos the A/C quit working. I called another company as I couldn't locate the other guy. The tech came out, took a look at the unit and said the compressor was probably frozen but that he couldn't tell until he put a booser on it to see if he could get it running. He said it was turning off because it was overheating and was getting a signal to turn on. He didn't look in the attic or mention anything about a disabled switch.
It's a carrier. I don't have the BTUs.
Any suggestions? What should it cost to replace the compressor it that's what turns out to be bad? The A/C is 10 years old. Should I replace the whole unit, if the compressor is bad?
Thanks : -)
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That's the problem. ACs need Btus in order to work and you must have run out. Get a refill and you will be all set.
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Pawlowski's response was neither useful nor funny. Leave the humor contributions to us professionals.
wrote in message

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So, is your response useful or funny?
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wrote Re Re: a/c compressor burned out?:

Much more useful than yours. Heck it was even funnier than yours.
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I'm sure it's cool. He couldn't handle the pressure, if I'm any gage of things. He did a fan tastic job of popping off, hope he didn't overload you. I'm sure you've got a good capacity for hard starting posters. He's probably a Typhoid Mary, a carrier don't you know. I see a ton of posts like that, they don't draft em, just type and send. If you're not airflow, you can write like that, too. I'm trying to be careful to not be usefl/ow, or funny. Maybe I should draft this, it's off to a hard start. A super boost of editing could help. But, writing isn't one of my manifold talents. Neither am I a punster, though Herman Punster was one of my favorite kids shows. Him and Grandpa and Eddie.
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On Fri, 29 Sep 2006 08:18:49 -0400, "Craven Morehead"

A professional comedian?
:)

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Ed's all right, in my book. He's been consistently helpful with the occasional light remark about wiring, or a bit of freon advice. Actually, I considered writing whatyou did, but you BTU it. Next time, I'll beat YOU to it.
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wrote in message

I thought BTUs was relevant. I guess it's tons. Oh well.
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The newer ones are so much more efficient. They run on CTU, not BTU. The older ones used tons and tons of BTU. Before that, when they first came out, they used ATU. They even have some RTU units, which are a lot more efficient.
Incidentally, a "ton" of cooling is the ammount of energy needed to convert a ton of ice to water at 32F. Which works out to 12,000 BTU per hour.
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Stormin Mormon writes:

Per hour, eh?
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Yep, per hour.
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Stormin Mormon writes:

Nope, your dimensions are in error.
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Please post corrections. Even a parakeet can say "no you're wrong" but it takes wisdom to post truth.
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Your errors include the heat of fusion of water and its units, what a "ton" of cooling is, trying to equate the two, saying that some amount of cooling would "convert a ton of ice to water", and that cooling equates to energy.
The heat of fusion of water is specified in units of heat/mass, such as 79.7 cal/gm, or 287 KBTU/ton. A ton of cooling is a rate of heat transfer, not an amount of heat. You cannot equate the first to the second, such as your saying it "works out" to some equivalence. Cooling is a rate of heat transfer, not an "amount of energy" as you said.
Which all suggests you are a poseur when it comes to HVAC.
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http://www.answers.com/topic/air-conditioning Equipment Capacity Air conditioner equipment power in the U.S. is often described in terms of "tons of refrigeration". A "ton of refrigeration" is defined as the cooling power of one short ton (2000 pounds or 907 kilograms) of ice melting in a 24-hour period. This is equal to 12,000 BTU per hour, or 3517 watts [3]. Residential "central air" systems are usually from 1 to 5 tons (3 to 20 kW) in capacity.
You, on the other hand, post a highly technical writing on the subject which turns out to be incorrect. Which all suggests that you are an engineer, not a HVAC man such as myself.
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Stormin Mormon writes:

I agree with the authority you quote. Your rendition is confused.

Agreed, if by "HVAC man" you mean someone who can't tell cooling from energy, or BTUs from BTUs/hour. Kind of like the garage mechanic who puts "pounds" of air into tires.
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Richard J Kinch wrote:

Well, you actually can put pounds of air in tires. And the number of pounds of air you put in will correlate strongly with the resulting pressure in psi !
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CJT writes:

Now you are mistaking a pound as a unit of mass, when it is a unit of force.
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I'd like to see you put 30 pounds of air into a tire. It'll burst way before you even get one pound in there.
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