A/C Coil and Furnace Question

Am replacing furnace with a high efficency American Standard/Trane furnace, AUY080. The contractor suggested replacing the evaporator A/C coil while the duct work is being done inside, and we do plan to replace the outdoor a/c unit soon (like in the spring).
Question: Does a Trane/A-S coil TXC036C4HPC0 coil have a thermal expansion valve? If it doesn't (as I suspect) could one be added -- if that will help the a/c system? Also, what Trane or A/S outdoor unit would be best suited for this coil?
Thanks!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You can check out your TRANE choices here: http://www.trane.com/Residential/Products/Coils.aspx
I'm not a TRANE distributor, but most manufacturer's provide a TXV [Thermal ExpansionValve] kit to modify the coil if it doesn't have one.
Ask your contractor. It's best to have a experienced HVACR tech install an service it properly at startup.
--
Zyp
"John" < snipped-for-privacy@no.spam> wrote in message news: snipped-for-privacy@no.spam...
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It's a 3 ton coil with expansion valve. You could go with jkust about any 3 ton condensing unit.
Why not go ahead and do THAT now too? It'd be cheaper than having them come back and doing it later.....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes and no. In the case of my new setup, they are going to come back in the spring to setup the AC, when it is warm out, since it isn't a good idea to run it during the winter. Told me to call them, when the temps get into the 70's for a couple of days in the spring.
They did install the line set, and everything else, but didn't run the unit.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

This is Turtle.
I would not change a coil inside and then do some major work later on the system later with a condenser unit and tubing set. When you change one item in the big three items like the condenser / tubing set / evaperator coil --- You change everything as one item to have everything matching and set together as one unit. You would not say hey put me a new trasmission in my car and next year I will take that transmission and put it in my new car I get next spring. Don't piece a unit when your going to buy the whole thing soon.
TURTLE
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
TURTLE wrote:

I agree that it's best to do everything at once, but what if that is not possible? For example if a new furnace needs to be installed in the fall (as in you just bought the house and it needs a new furnace) and you also want a new compressor unit outside, the ambient temperatures may no longer be warm enough to run a compressor until spring.
In this case, why would it not be better to figure out what size equipment you need all around, install the coil now with the new furnace, and do the rest of the a/c system in the Spring when the unit can be operated and tested. That eliminates the need to rip apart the new furnace installation in the spring so that the evaporator coil can be installed.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Then don't run the compressor, silly!
You don't need to run it to install it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Oscar_Lives wrote:

So what's the point of not waiting until the spring to install the outdoor unit, since the contractor will have to return to get the proper refrigerant charge and check out the system when it is operating anyway.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That's fine if you get a price for it NOW.
Equipment prices are going up after the first of the year (they always do). AND, if it was MY company, you'd get charged more money for having to make a second trip....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

he can put the proper charge in now.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bite the bullet and get your AC unit replaced at the same time.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Just something you should verify and Im no pro and maybe wrong, but doesnt the 80 in your model # indicate it is an 80% efficient unit.. If your installer said that is a high efficiency unit it may not be. High effeciency units are 93-94.5%
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 6 Dec 2004 06:42:10 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (m Ransley) wrote:

You are an idiot for bringing up shit you know nothing about. Clue #1 The 80 is the BTU's Clue #2 High eff is also 92.1% Clue #3 Dont stir up shit and put doubt in the posters mind and call the hvac guy a crook when you are just clueless. Bubba
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That's a standard efficiency coil with a FCCV piston used as modulating device. This coil would be used with 10 or 11 seer units. An expansion valve kit can be added but for 12+ seer, but with high seer, I wouldn't put a larger od unit than 2.5tons with that coil.
About a year from now the minimum seer is going to be 13. As a matter of policy, we've been getting away from 10 seer equipment unless specified by the customer, usually on rental property where someone else is paying the electric bill.
If you live where it gets pretty warm during the summer, it might be a good idea to get a high efficiency outdoor unit with a matching coil inside.
Robert
--
Robert Worcester
A1 Worcester Air
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.