A bit OT


Okay, I read this group daily but don't think that I have ever ask a question (have answered a few) but now I have one.
I'm in the Midwest and my daughter just recently purchased a house in San Diego. She just called and said that her yard was a mess and definitely needed grass seed and she wanted to know what type of seed to purchase. She does not want a perfect lawn by any means, just something to make it green. She also has no intention of asking a local government agency and making a big deal of it.
If it was in this area we would just throw out a rye and fescue mix and that would work fine but I have no idea about that area. Anyone from that general area that can give me a hint?
Thanks,
Don
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But that's what the state coop is for in the many states that have one. But if not that, a garden shop would be good. There is also alt.home.lawn.garden .

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Tell her to go to the local nursery.
Steve
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I am sure the correct answer is here: http://search.ca.gov/search?q=lawn+grass&site _all&client_x&output=xml_no_dtd&proxystylesheet_x
But I did not wade though the whole list.
I do agree with the advice to check out a local nursery and see what they have the biggest stock of in store. I don't care for ryes but I have a fescue lawn in the bluegrass state.
Colbyt
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On Fri, 19 Mar 2010 08:52:59 -0400, "Colbyt"

Ryes are good. If you don't mow the lawn, you can make bread. Whoever heard of a salami on fescue?

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IGot2P wrote:

Depends where in "San Diego" she lives. Climate/terrain ranges from near-desert to semi-serious mountain elevations.
Ask a neighbor with a nice lawn and do what tbey do...
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"IGot2P" wrote

Lived there 6 years. In San Diego proper through La Mesa (until you hit the desert part), you want a high drought resistant grass. Spread all the way to Alpine, and you can go with a less drought resistant type but are better to get that sort anyways.
Water restrictions are serious there. You simply will normally not be allowed to water a lawn (or wash a car with a hose). You may not even be allowed to use well water for that.
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San Diego is a desert. Grass will require water. There are other ground coverings that do not need water, and those should be considered. Ice plant (sedums) grow well and spread fast in full sun, colorful flowers too.
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[snip]

Ice plant has been blighted throughout the state for the last two (or three) decades. I'd not recommend anyone plant it, as a ground-covering or a minor hedge.
As Steve B said, have her visit a local nursery. A nurseryman (non-Box) will be able to steer her towards low-maintenance, low-cost, low-resource ideas. Watering will be the main issue but so will the soil type, light, and her available time to keep it reasonably nice.
The Ranger
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The Ranger wrote: ...

Also, check w/ local Extension Office; they'll have local recommendations based on ag school agronomists knowledge/research that may be alternatives that a particular retailer may or may not know...
--
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I visited out there several years ago and pebbles were very popular.
Jimmie
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Definitely stay away from the Box's!! Their store HQ buyers are all the way across the country and have no idea what grass seed grows in what locale. They routinely ship cold weather seed to warm weather locales and the seed has no chance of survival. And the average uninformed homeowner buys it, plants it, it dies, and the homeowner posts a "what happened to my yard" post.
KC
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