8 gauge wire to 30 amp circuit

This is a great place for information thanks.
We are buying a dual fuel range that specifies a 30 amp 4 wire for installation. I have 8 gauge wire and I'm wondering if it will be a problem to use that for the 30 amp breaker or if i should get 10 gauge instead--the run to the box is about 18 feet.
Thanks, Gavin
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Should be no problem at all. Larry
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Nec requires an outlet and plug to connect your range, which is actually good in your case as most of the wiring chambers on duel fuel units are tight. Use the oversized cable, but connect it to a thirty amp four wire outlet and use thirty amp cord set as well. Be real careful to note the exact location where the outlets is to be installed. There's generally little room for error

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If it calls for 30A, then it would be a waste to use 8ga wire. Just get a 10/3 w/ground and be done.
--
Steve Barker




<mission_modern_and snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com> wrote in message
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He already has the 8. Using 10 will be more expensive, since he has to buy that.
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Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Boy! I'm just not reading well at all today, am I?
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Steve Barker




"Doug Miller" < snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com> wrote in message
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On 5 Mar 2007 08:39:21 -0800, mission_modern_and snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Bigger than needed never hurts a thing when it comes to wire, except sometimes it's hard to connect to things. For example, one place I worked in years ago, the owner built a rec-room in the basement and ran a 10-2 cable to the unfinished side for a future outdoor outlet. I ended up installing the box and outlet. What a pain in the butt to connect #10 wire to a common outlet. I finally pigtailed some #12 with wirenuts. As long as you can attach the #8, use it. For a Range, I doubt you'll have any problems attaching the wires. If by chance you dont have enough of the #8, use a #10 for the ground.
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I would like to add, should the branch circuit have any wire of maximum allowable overcurrent protection less than that of any other wire in that branch circuit likely to be seen: Put a note in the breaker box by the breaker!
In fact, I have seen something saying that it is against code to have a branch circuit with mixed wire sizes. Although I am not sure whether this is NEC or a local building code - I saw this in a municipal government website of some municipality.
Furthermore, if anything connected to that branch circuit has maximum allowable overcurrent protection less than that typical of wiring likely to be seen, even if other than these pigtails, I would see a yellow flag in my head. I don't know whether or not code allows such. In any case I would have a note in the breaker box saying maximum allowable overcurrent protection for the branch circuit that both oversize wire and also not-so-oversized items.
Things get easier when using common items with AWG 12 wire and 20 amp breakers - this reduces chances of having the branch circuit having/getting a breaker oversized for whatever. And I think especially don't mix 14 and 12 AWG wire in a branch circuit, lest someone replace the 15 amp breaker with a 20 amp one in response to seeing the 12 AWG wire!
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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