76% of american whites experience economic uncertainty by the time they turn 60

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Economic insecurity among whites also is more pervasive than is shown in government data, engulfing more than 76 percent of white adults by the time they turn 60, according to a new economic gauge being published next year by the Oxford University Press.
"They live mostly off government disability checks."
"Children - have nothing better to do than to get on drugs."
And that, in a nutshell, is how you describe americans today.
Going back to the 1980s, never have whites been so pessimistic about their futures, according to the General Social Survey, which is conducted by NORC at the University of Chicago. Just 45 percent say their family will have a good chance of improving their economic position based on the way things are in America.
Down and down the toilet bowl you go USA...
In other news - iPhones to get finger-print scanner - connected directly to FBI courtesy of the NSA. Because eventually half of all americans will be employed to watch over, jail, or police the other half.
===================================== WASHINGTON (AP) Four out of 5 U.S. adults struggle with joblessness, near poverty or reliance on welfare for at least parts of their lives, a sign of deteriorating economic security and an elusive American dream.
Survey data exclusive to The Associated Press points to an increasingly globalized U.S. economy, the widening gap between rich and poor and loss of good-paying manufacturing jobs as reasons for the trend.
The findings come as President Barack Obama tries to renew his administration's emphasis on the economy, saying in recent speeches that his highest priority is to "rebuild ladders of opportunity" and reverse income inequality.
Hardship is particularly on the rise among whites, based on several measures. Pessimism among that racial group about their families' economic futures has climbed to the highest point since at least 1987. In the most recent AP-GfK poll, 63 percent of whites called the economy "poor."
"I think it's going to get worse," said Irene Salyers, 52, of Buchanan County, Va., a declining coal region in Appalachia. Married and divorced three times, Salyers now helps run a fruit and vegetable stand with her boyfriend, but it doesn't generate much income. They live mostly off government disability checks.
"If you do try to go apply for a job, they're not hiring people, and they're not paying that much to even go to work," she said. Children, she said, have "nothing better to do than to get on drugs."
While racial and ethnic minorities are more likely to live in poverty, race disparities in the poverty rate have narrowed substantially since the 1970s, census data show. Economic insecurity among whites also is more pervasive than is shown in government data, engulfing more than 76 percent of white adults by the time they turn 60, according to a new economic gauge being published next year by the Oxford University Press.
The gauge defines "economic insecurity" as experiencing unemployment at some point in their working lives, or a year or more of reliance on government aid such as food stamps or income below 150 percent of the poverty line. Measured across all races, the risk of economic insecurity rises to 79 percent.
"It's time that America comes to understand that many of the nation's biggest disparities, from education and life expectancy to poverty, are increasingly due to economic class position," said William Julius Wilson, a Harvard professor who specializes in race and poverty.
He noted that despite continuing economic difficulties, minorities have more optimism about the future after Obama's election, while struggling whites do not.
"There is the real possibility that white alienation will increase if steps are not taken to highlight and address inequality on a broad front," Wilson said.
___
Sometimes termed "the invisible poor" by demographers, lower-income whites are generally dispersed in suburbs as well as small rural towns, where more than 60 percent of the poor are white. Concentrated in Appalachia in the East, they are also numerous in the industrial Midwest and spread across America's heartland, from Missouri, Arkansas and Oklahoma up through the Great Plains.
More than 19 million whites fall below the poverty line of $23,021 for a family of four, accounting for more than 41 percent of the nation's destitute, nearly double the number of poor blacks.
Still, while census figures provide an official measure of poverty, they're only a temporary snapshot. The numbers don't capture the makeup of those who cycle in and out of poverty at different points in their lives. They may be suburbanites, for example, or the working poor or the laid off.
In 2011 that snapshot showed 12.6 percent of adults in their prime working-age years of 25-60 lived in poverty. But measured in terms of a person's lifetime risk, a much higher number ? 4 in 10 adults ? falls into poverty for at least a year of their lives.
The risks of poverty also have been increasing in recent decades, particularly among people ages 35-55, coinciding with widening income inequality. For instance, people ages 35-45 had a 17 percent risk of encountering poverty during the 1969-1989 time period; that risk increased to 23 percent during the 1989-2009 period. For those ages 45-55, the risk of poverty jumped from 11.8 percent to 17.7 percent.
By race, nonwhites still have a higher risk of being economically insecure, at 90 percent. But compared with the official poverty rate, some of the biggest jumps under the newer measure are among whites, with more than 76 percent enduring periods of joblessness, life on welfare or near-poverty.
By 2030, based on the current trend of widening income inequality, close to 85 percent of all working-age adults in the U.S. will experience bouts of economic insecurity.
"Poverty is no longer an issue of 'them', it's an issue of 'us'," says Mark Rank, a professor at Washington University in St. Louis who calculated the numbers. "Only when poverty is thought of as a mainstream event, rather than a fringe experience that just affects blacks and Hispanics, can we really begin to build broader support for programs that lift people in need."
Rank's analysis is supplemented with figures provided by Tom Hirschl, a professor at Cornell University; John Iceland, a sociology professor at Penn State University; the University of New Hampshire's Carsey Institute; the Census Bureau; and the Population Reference Bureau.
Among the findings:
?For the first time since 1975, the number of white single-mother households who were living in poverty with children surpassed or equaled black ones in the past decade, spurred by job losses and faster rates of out-of-wedlock births among whites. White single-mother families in poverty stood at nearly 1.5 million in 2011, comparable to the number for blacks. Hispanic single-mother families in poverty trailed at 1.2 million.
?The share of children living in high-poverty neighborhoods ? those with poverty rates of 30 percent or more ? has increased to 1 in 10, putting them at higher risk of teen pregnancy or dropping out of school. Non-Hispanic whites accounted for 17 percent of the child population in such neighborhoods, up from 13 percent in 2000, even though the overall proportion of white children in the U.S. has been declining.
The share of black children in high-poverty neighborhoods dropped sharply, from 43 percent to 37 percent, while the share of Latino children ticked higher, from 38 to 39 percent.
___
Going back to the 1980s, never have whites been so pessimistic about their futures, according to the General Social Survey, which is conducted by NORC at the University of Chicago. Just 45 percent say their family will have a good chance of improving their economic position based on the way things are in America.
The divide is especially evident among those whites who self-identify as working class: 49 percent say they think their children will do better than them, compared with 67 percent of non-whites who consider themselves working class.
In November, Obama won the votes of just 36 percent of those noncollege whites, the worst performance of any Democratic nominee among that group since 1984.
Some Democratic analysts have urged renewed efforts to bring working-class whites into the political fold, calling them a potential "decisive swing voter group" if minority and youth turnout level off in future elections.
"They don't trust big government, but it doesn't mean they want no government," says Republican pollster Ed Goeas, who agrees that working-class whites will remain an important electoral group. "They feel that politicians are giving attention to other people and not them."
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<rant on>
How elusive the "American dream" is rather depends upon what it is. It is often defined as "a better life than the previous generation".
Unfortunately, "a better life" generally means "more things"...a bigger house, more cars, more frequent - and lavish - vacations, etc. ad nauseum. It is my feeling that people would be a lot happier if they spent less time wanting more and more time enjoying what they have; enjoy their family and friends...their health...a summer day...a sunset.
Economic security? Want to know what economic INsecurity is? It's starting a business with no money and no idea of WTF you are doing. BTDT and lived for many years with the feeling of imminent financial disaster; it never happened, somehow things always worked out. Which does NOT mean we had a lot of money...we did not but never felt poor. We did without things that many would consider "necessities" but which we did not need or even particularly want. For things we did need, we deferred purchase until we could pay cash...we haven't bought anything on credit since 1973.
I'm 80 now and that sense of impending doom left decades ago. I haven't checked lately but our net worth would be above 7 figures. However, until recently, our cash income would probably have been below the federal poverty level; doesn't matter, we have a paid for and substantial home, plenty to eat, just got back from a vacation, recently bought a new 1.5 year old car and I have $500 of just purchased lumber for my current home improvement project :) We have plenty for our needs and wants. _____________________

Some income is better than no income.

Sheesh, let them get a part time job! They don't have paper routes anymore? And if they are on drugs, mom and pop have done a lousy job. _____________________

If it doesn't generate much income they might want to consider doing something else.

Ah, there it is...the easy way out: government checks. Forget about figuring out how too take care of yourself, let the government (everybody else) do it. Yes, I saw the word "disability" and I agree that some truly are but in many cases, "disability" equates to laziness or lack of cojones.
It wasn't always so. Time was, people used their fertile minds and whatever abilities they had to take care of themselves. I remember one fellow back in the forties who used to lug around an 18" grindstone with a foot operated treadle. He would go door to door offering to sharpen knives, scissors, axes, spades, etc. I have no idea what he charged, maybe a nickel, maybe a dime but he was always busy. I suspect he could make at least $1.00 per hour, maybe $2.00. Which wasn't bad then, lots of jobs paid less. Doesn't really matter, the point is that he took action instead of sitting around whining with his hand out.
<rant off>
--

dadiOH
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In wrote:

Gosh yes; I was jobless from birth until I was 13.
--
snipped-for-privacy@iphouse.com St. Paul, MN

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The other 50% can't do simple math. ** Lonesome Dove
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Oren wrote:

You and about 10 million other patriotic americans collecting SS disability.
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wrote:

I'm a Vietnam Veteran. I just found out that once a military veteran turns 65 the Department of Veteran Affairs considers them 100% disabled regardless of their physical or mental condition so they get $15,000.00+ in annual pension. Works for me. I'm checking in Friday to sign up. Is this a great country or what? ** Lonesome Dove
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I'd rather my tax payer dollars go to vietnam vets, compared to the Obama Fone generation that doesn't know how to work.
Thank you for your service. /I (rot han saloot!)
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
On 7/30/2013 7:34 PM, Lonesome Dove wrote:

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On 07-30-2013 19:34, Lonesome Dove wrote:

I find that hard to believe. I am officially a Viet Nam Era veteran even though I enlisted in 1974. Bureaucracy being what it is, it took them that long to finally acknowledge the "era" had ended.
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On Tue, 30 Jul 2013 21:28:18 -0400, Wes Groleau

Get your hands on a copy of 2011 edition of the Post Service Officers Guide and on page 99, Section 4 Disability Requirements you will find: "There is a presumption of being permanently and totally disable (P&T) by age 65, or if under age 65 is (1) a patient in a nursing home for long term care bacause of a disability, or (2) a veteran determined to be disabled by social security disability decision."
What's hard to believe about that? ** Lonesome Dove
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wrote in message wrote:

OK, I d/l the pdf you specified. There is no page 99. The only thing I found related to age 65 and pensions is this:
NONSERVICE-CONNECTED DISABILITY PENSION VA nonservice-connected disability pension is an income support program available to those veterans who: a. Served 90 or more continuous days of active duty, one of which was during wartime; and b. Have established financial need; and c. Are age 65 or permanently and totally disabled
Note that it is an income SUPPORT program. That means they don't lay a bunch of money on you, they make up any deficency between piss poor and plain poor. __________________

We all know that the feds throw money around willy-nilly. What's hard to believe is that they would lay 15K per year on *everybody* who was ever in the military during a war just because of their remarkable accomplishment of reaching age 65. Even the feds aren't that generous (stupid). I hope.
--

dadiOH
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wrote:

What can I say?
A.
CURRENT PENSION
Sec. 1. Eligibility: Pension is available for wartime veterans who are permanently and totally disabled from disabilities not related to service. Pension is also available for their surviving spouse and/or children (Also called death pension).
See. 2. Service Requirements: A. World War I: April 6, 1917 to November 11, 1918, extended to April 1, 1920 for service in Russia and to July 1, 1921 for those veterans who had at least one day of service before November 12, 1918 and who served after November 11,1918 and before July 2,1921. B. World War II: December 7, 1941 to December 31, 1946. C. Korean Conflict: June 27, 1950 to January 31, 1955. D. Vietnam Era: The period beginning on February 28, 1961 and ending on May 7, 1975, inclusive, in the case of a veteran who served in Vietnam during that period. The period beginning on August 5, 1964 to May 7, 1975, inclusive, in all other cases. E. Persian Gulf August 2, 1990 to be determined.
Sec. 3. Active Duty Requirements:
B. 90 days or more wartime service; or 90 days or more consecutive service which began or ended during wartime period; or 90 days or more combined service in two or more wartime periods; or if less than 90 days, discharged for a disability in line of duty if they entered service prior to September 7, 1980, or entered service after September 7, 1980 and has completed a continuous period of active duty of at least 24 months, or C. The full period for which a person was called or ordered to active duty.
NOTE: Travel time from place of discharge to home by the most direct route may be included in the active duty period.
Sec. 4. Disability Requirements: War time veterans with low income who are permanently and totally disabled (P&T), or are age 65 and older, may be eligible for monetary support if they meet the active duty requirements mentioned above. There is a presumption of being permanently and totally disabled (P&T) by age 65, or if under age 65 is (1) a patient in a nursing home for long term care because of a
99
That 99 there, that's the page number. ** Lonesome Dove
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On 07-31-2013 09:08, Lonesome Dove wrote:

The last two are easy to believe. The first is surprising to say the least. But think about the word "presumption"--might it be used in the same sense as "presumption of innocence"? In U.S. jurisprudence, the accused is "presumed innocent" but may still be proven guilty.
It would be quite nice to be paid as if disabled. But since I have good vision, good hearing, and can bicycle thirty miles, I don't expect it. I'd have to ask myself whether it's even ethical to accept it.
--
Wes Groleau

"What progress we are making! In the Middle Ages, they would have
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wrote in message wrote:

Did you have a military disability previously? I'm a Korean vet, no disability; I'm also 80 and they aren't sending me any $$. OTOH, my older brother is a WW2 vet and has always had a small disability payment (thanks to a Japanese grenade in the Philippines) and they upped him to 100% a few years ago but long after he turned 65.
--

dadiOH
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On 7/31/2013 6:02 AM, dadiOH wrote:

People should be ashamed for the way Korean war vets are treated. Perhaps that's why it's called the forgotten war. Those asswipes running the country's educational systems don't make much of a mention of it or any at all when kids a taught history. O_o
TDD
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Oren wrote:

A day that Canadians wear the red poppy, because it was Canada that stepped up to defeat Germany during WW1, not the US.
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On 7/31/2013 6:34 PM, Homo Gay wrote:

So Homo Gay, you are living in a warmongering country. ^_^
TDD
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wrote:

I just did some checking. A vet - with or without an existing disability pension - can get the age 65 VA thing IF...
1. Their household income is below a certain amount (a bit over $2000/month for man & wife)
- AND -
2. They have less than $80,000 in assets.
If one qualifies, the VA pays the difference between their income and the maximum allowed.
Somewhat less than a windfall, sorry Lonesome Dove.
--

dadiOH
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wrote:

Look on page 104 and get back to us. Depends upon which pension your service falls under. And as for income limitations in general, if you're retired and on social security, how many get over $2,000.00 a month? I sure don't and I have no assets in my name. I think I'm going to get top dollar but I'll let you know after Friday. ** Lonesome Dove
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wrote in message wrote:

So you'd get the difference between your TOTAL family income and $2000+
--

dadiOH
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On 07-31-2013 08:04, dadiOH wrote:

That's me.

If a house is considered an asset, then you'd almost _have_ to be renting. I bought mine for fifty thou, but it's a dump and I expect it to be over eighty if ever I finish fixing it.

Where did you do this checking?
--
Wes Groleau

I won't burn your Koran because I don't want you to burn my Bible;
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