60 year old house- painting exterior.. lead paint

Ive got a 60 year old house.. Needs repainting on ext badly.. I did a lead test and it is positive. I have scraped only.. However there are areas where the scraping looks terrible, you can see layers .. I can not scrap all the paint off.. For the uneven surfaces should I put wood filler or spackling to make it even? thanks
THing is I do NOT want to sand due to lead
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cover with siding of your choice....
end repainting forever....
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On 9/5/2011 11:26 AM, bob haller wrote:

Yeah, but some of us Really Hate the look of vinyl. And vinyl over old wood siding has a nasty habit of things moving into the dead spaces between layers. If you must use vinyl, at least strip the old siding down to sheathing (a 1960 house will likely have celotex with plywood corners), so you can add a thin layer of high-density foam, and up the probably-inadequate R-value of the walls, as well as adding a vapor barrier.
--
aem sends...

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wrote:

I know! We laugh and call the vinyl...plastic. Cuz it looks like plastic junk.
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KOS wrote the following:

Bondo
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
  Click to see the full signature.
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On Mon, 5 Sep 2011 07:24:18 -0700 (PDT), KOS

They have vinyl exterior spacking compound. Sorry I can't tell you how easily it goes on or holds up, but you might find that on the net. I have a quart of it that's been sitting here about 8 years unused. DAP I think. Old enough I'm going to toss it. Bought it for the garage siding where the paint came off in just some places but the rest is solid. Never got around to painting as it never got worse and where it's bare the wood is still fine. Might be cedar. Try a pint/quart and see how it goes on. Should work. Good you're thinking of that instead of just slopping paint on. It'll make a world of difference in the finished job if done right.
--Vic
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Then don't sand it...
Use a power paint scraper with a very good vacuum --
http://www.paintpro.net/Articles/PP803/PP803-Products-Paintshaver.cfm
It sounds like you aren't sharpening your scraper often enough during your manual scraping adventure... They need to be sharp to work best...
Working around lead paint these days it is recommended but not required for a homeowner to use personal protection equipment like a face shield and to put down plastic to catch anything that comes off the surface being de-leaded so that the local area does not get contaminated but such measures are only required of professional licensed contractors...
~~ Evan
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KOS wrote:

Use paint remover.
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On Mon, 5 Sep 2011 07:24:18 -0700 (PDT), KOS

If you have lead paint on your house, that house has to be destroyed. Right this moment I'd bet big money that the government is tracing your internet service to locate you, after admitting to owning this shack of death. They should be at your door within 24 hours to place a "CONDEMNED" sign on your front door.
* IT'S THE LAW *
Any house or other building containing lead paint MUST be professionally demolished, and must be done so in accordance with the law. All demolition workers must wear special air tight suits and oxygen masks. The entire home must be covered with a special plastic shield and be certified to be leakproof before demolition. The house must then be demolished one board or piece at a time, and each board or piece must be sealed with a plastic coating to prevent the lead from entering the atmosphere. Upon completion of the job, all materials from the home must be transported into space by a specially trained NASA crew, to insure that all materials are discarded a minumum of 5000 miles from the earth's surface.
The homeowner is responsible for all costs associated with this demolition and removal of materials from the earth. These costs generally start at fifty million dollars for a small home, and can exceed one billion dollars for a large home or other large building.
This type of deadly home can not be lived in, sold, traded, given away, insured, constructed or demolished by the homeowner, and shall not be allowed to remain standing for more than 60 days upon proof that it contains lead paint, unless it is placed inside of a protective containment structure, where air, soil, and water monitoring sources are provided at all times, to insure there is no leakage into the surrounding atmosphere.
Additionally, all top soil must be removed a minimum of 12 inches deep surrounding the entire home/structure, for a minimum of 100 feet surrounding the entire structure, (depending on environmental factors and whether the home exists inside a flood plain, or high wind region). All removed top soil must also be sealed, and disposed into space with the other building materials. Any other structure within the lead polluted soil, such as a neighboring home, must also be destroyed and disposed in the same manner as the original contaminated home, and also at the expense of the homeowner, which will include but is not limited to the re-purchase costs and relocation fees for the neighbor, plus additional compensation for their time and grief.
Rob's Legal Associates Inc.
Rob Jackson, Attorney at law
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wrote:

I hope you realize you just made that remark to an Attorney at Law. This is called "Defamation of character". I have no choice but to have you prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law and tried in a court of law. You will be hearing from me and my own attorney, and will be subject to arrest and imprisoned without bail until a legal judge hears this case. I hope you have a good attorney, because you will need one.
Rob Jackson, Attorney at law
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On Sep 6, 5:16pm, snipped-for-privacy@legalnet.org wrote:

Whoever informed you of that is sorely mistaken...
While the PPE used when working around lead that is being sanded or shaved off a surface for refinishing resembles the same personal protective equipment requirements for asbestos removal the disposal requirements are not similar at all...
This is because it is the small particles of sanded/shaved lead that creates the health and contamination risks...
Just wrap in ordinary plastic and dispose of in a normal construction dumpster -- lead painted debris is not considered a controlled hazardous waste...
Homeowners doing their own work around lead paint are not required in any way, shape or form to follow the same lead removal procedures that licensed building contractors MUST follow...
~~ Evan
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On 9/7/2011 1:24 AM, Evan wrote:

I read or heard on a radio program about a woman consumed by the hysteria over broken compact florescent lights, calling an environmental cleanup company and finding out it would cost her thousands of dollars to have them come to her home and cleanup the mess from one broken bulb. ^_^
TDD
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On 10/01/11 08:57 am, The Daring Dufas wrote:

That incident has come up here before. Broken CFLs are to be dealt with the same as broken fluorescent tubes of the type we've been using for decades: wrap them up and throw them in the trash.
http://www.epa.gov/cfl/cflcleanup.html
Perce
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