60 Hz buzzing noise coming from floor

I'm not sure if its always been present and I've never noticed it before, but for the past year I always hear a buzzing sound coming from underneath the floor in my kitchen. It is on at all times. If I go in the basement below the kitchen, I can hear this same buzzing sound coming from overhead in the ceiling. It sounds like the standard 60 Hz buzz that you get from old transformers. Its especially obvious at night, when everything is quiet (if actually sounds louder although I'm not sure if this is my imagination or not). I have tried to isolate where this sound is coming from but it is proving to be quite difficult (I have read posts on the Internet that says that the human ear has a difficult time pinpointing the source of a 60 Hz tone, and its true. I'll be in the basement with my head in the ceiling, and it'll sound like the sound is right in front of me. I'll turn my head 45 degrees and it'll sound like its right behind me).
I have tried turning off the power to the entire house at the fuse box, and the sound disappears. So I know that it's not coming from the pipes (certain people have said that a toilet slowly leaking can create this type of buzzing sound). I have also tried removing the fuses one at a time (that is, removing one, listening for the noise, then putting the fuse back in and removing the next fuse), and oddly enough I have noticed that removing a particular fuse reduces the sound by about 75% but doesn't get rid of it completely. Only shutting down the whole power eliminates the buzzing 100%.
Is it possible for old electrical wires to make this buzzing sound? Or would it come from something else (ex: a light fixture that has a bad ground). I'm not sure how to go about fixing this problem. But like I said I can isolate it to something within the kitchen floor (or within the basement ceiling) itself.
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Follow your doorbell wiring to the doorbell transformer
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I second that vote.

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"Doug Kanter" ( snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com) writes:

You have to find a way to keep the transformer away from the wood (?) it's fastened to right now. Maybe screw a small hook into a joist and hang the transformer from it using say an adjustable nylon loop around the outside.
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or just put some rubber between it and whatever its screwed to.
randy
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I'm not an electrician but it sounds like a transformer, unlikely though in the house unless it is in an appliance, or a open or ground problem some where. Maybe the residents electric guys have a clue. Good luck
Terry

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Jonny R wrote:

All kinds of things use transformers today. You furnance likely has one, the doorbell, a smoke alarm, TV cable amp, it goes on and on.
--
Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
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<Story about 60 Hz buzzing in the floor>
Although I agree with the doorbell transformer hypothesis, I can think of other things to check - especially since there appears to be more than source (Jonny says shutting down a particular circuit reduces the noise by 75%).
Look for starterless fluorescent fixtures that have missing or burnt out bulbs but are receiving power. Also, are there any fluorescent night lights?
How about any wall transformers left plugged in - such as for a battery charger or a charger for a cordless power tool?
Could there be more than one doorbell transformer?
Do the telephones have features powered by a transformer? (Most home phones do not but some do and many office phones do.)
Are any appliances with transformers sitting on the floor or on rigid furniture on the floor anywhere? Floor vibrations can travel far and the floor may even vibrate the most a few or possibly several feet from the source of the vibration. In addition, acoustic standing waves may make the sound louder near a wall or in a corner across a room from the source than at locations closer to the source (or the part of the floor that is vibrating the most).
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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Don's right here if you're thinking it's coming from the ceiling. At lot of instant-on fluorescent fixtures will buzz if the ballast is going or even bad lamps.
If you've got fluorescent fixtures, look at them.
Jake
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Jake wrote:

or attached to the ducts which transmit the noise though the house.
Bob
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