6-Pack 6-LED Aluminum Flashlights - Any good?

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wrote:

I've consistently received good refill supplies and helpful answers/customer service from:
http://www.printertonerwarehouse.com/ and http://www.ink-refills-ink.com /
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Remember the grey ones with the red lens holder? Those were awesome. The black ones with the yellow lens were good, too. Wish I still had several of those.
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Christopher A. Young
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Where is your HD, I went to mine today and they were 19.95, maybe if I can tell them the store that has them for 9.97 I can get your deal. They look good and I bet knowing HD the warranty is great, maybe lifetime as other HD stuff is.
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The aluminum sounds good to me for that price, I use dollar-store batteries (I've gotten 24 for a dollar at times) that hold up only slightly worse than alkalines, so zinc/carbon batteries powering LED's should be fine.
Unrelated... As for LED's we had a snowstorm here Monday as I commuted to work. As I came to the LED-based stop-and-go lights all of them were invisible and caked with snow, wherease the older incandescent stop-and-go lights were clear of snow. Somebody needs to put heaters in those new LED-based stop-and-go lights, they are pretty dangerous in a driving ice or snowstorm, LED's cant melt snow very good I guess. You would think the traffic companies would know this shit.
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There is a Real Deals Dollar store near me. They do have AAA cells, twenty for a buck. I bought several packages. Wonders, they won't run a three cell light. I find out after some head scratching, that about a third of the batteries in the packs were dead. Still a good price.
I hadn't thought of that, about the traffic lights. Sounds penny wise, and pound foolish.
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

Nah, makes a great deal of sense. A bulb in a traffic light lasts what? Say six years. An intersection has a minimum of 12 bulbs (more for left turn and other stuff). That means the city has to visit the intersection twice a year to replace a bulb. Counting the driver, the bulb-changer, and two apprentices to hold the shovels upright, it costs the city $100 per visit, or $200/year to keep the signals in your town working.
Assuming an LED has a lifetime five times that of an incandescent, and an LED traffic light has, like, 30 of the damn things, it's also evident that the light doesn't need attention until about 1/3 of them don't work. So the city has to visit the intersection - for the purpose of bulb maintenance - only once a decade or so.
Meanwhile, the power consumption of the things is way less, so the city saves on its electric bill.
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On Tue, 2 Dec 2008 14:36:40 -0800 (PST), RickH

I have the same issue with the LED Tail lights on my car. The side markers are incandecents and defrost themselves, but not the tail and brakelights. I also don't like the always on "running lights" which are the high beams on half power. It's just bright enough that several times I've driven quite a distance without realizing I haven't turned on the headlights. That also means I'm showing NO lights on the rear. With everything controlled by computer, why can't they simply make the running lights stay off when it is dark outside? I think the present design is quite a hazard. My inexpensive GPS goes to night mode based on the time for sunset, and returns to daylight mode at sunrise.
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DerbyDad03 wrote:

http://www.homedepot.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?storeId051&langId=-1&catalogId053&productId0652625
I *much* prefer the high-output LED flashlights. It's a lot easier to design a decent reflector for a single small light source. I had a 3-AA Maglite with a "3W" LED (there's no way it was 3 watts, but it might have been 1 watt) that I bought on sale a year ago -- one of the best flashlights I ever had. Alas, I left it in a hotel room a few months ago, and when I called about it they said they hadn't seen it. It was still going strong on the original set of alkaline batteries.
I don't understand why so many flashlights use AAA batteries. You give up too much capacity going from AA to AAA. (maybe they are really in the battery business)
Just today I bought an Energizer industrial flashlight (model MS2DLED) that has a single 1W LED, about a 2 inch reflector, and uses 2 D cells. It has o-rings in all the right places. It should run about forever on 2 heavy-duty carbon zinc batteries, and they are a lot lighter than alkalines. I bought it to keep in my truck.
Two or three C cells is the perfect size for a flashlight. It's just large enough that you won't lose it, and when there's a hurricane or a blizzard, C-cells are the last size they run out of at the stores.
Bob
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Yes, I'd bet the desk people have no clue what happened to your light. The maid, or the maint and repair guy took it home.
AAA cells. I don't really like them, either. They are OK for small light to carry in the pocket. Wish they would make a short light that took three AA cells, I'd like that. But, they don't. The Mag long stick light is closest to find. Harbor Freight used to have lights that took three AA cells in a row, I got a couple of those. Four or six LED. Good, but not great.
Please replace those carbon D cells once a year, or more often. They tend to leak. Alkalines last four times as long, if that's a concern.
I've noticed that C cells are the last size remaining. Not sure anyone makes C flashlights any more. Mag or Kel, maybe. Someone used to make "Anysizers". I got some. Clamshell that holds a AA cell, and makes it the size of D cell. C size to D conversion would be useful.
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I just purchased a current technology bike light and it is amazing how much light a single LED can generate. I scoffed at the idea of using an LED as a light source back in 2003, but they've come a long way. The thing running off its lithium ion battery pack puts out almost as much useful light as when I used to use a 50W halogen floodlight powered by a 12V gel cell lead-acid battery. Sure is easier dealing with a battery that weighs about as much as 3 AA batteries versus the old 10lb gel cell. Pop it off, bring just the battery inside and charge it off USB.
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My brother out law bought one also,looked pretty bright. Jerry
http://community.webtv.net/awoodbutcher/MyWoodWorkingPage
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