5 yrs on washer hoses?

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Hi All,
My Maytag manual says to replace washer water hoses every five years. I presume they are talking about those all rubber hoses.
Does this five year replacement plan also apply to my (expensive) stainless steel mesh reinforced hoses?
Many thanks, -T
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Todd wrote:

Lou
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If keeping them for more than 5 years will keep you awake at night, then replace them.
What is peace of mind worth to you?
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Do you turn the water off at the spigots whenever you're not using the washer?
nate
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Todd wrote:

Read the package.
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Claude Hopper :)

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Todd wrote:

I would think that would depend on your water supply pressure. I'm on a well pump that ranges from 30 to 50 lbs. I know some city water pressures can be 80 and above lbs. That shock pressure when the fill valves cut off can vary greatly. I've seen those cheap rubber hoses go 15 or 20 years without any problem.
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$20-$25 for new set of hoses, thousands to replace the water damage if they let go. Your call....
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good advice...

$20-$25 for new set of hoses, thousands to replace the water damage if they let go. Your call....
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trailer wrote:

washer-hose flood. Got our stainless hoses and would gladly replace them every five years. We were at home when the old washer hose let go and even so there was a great deal of water. Flooded dining room and newly remodeled kitchen. Hubby made a mad dash to rental store for a shop vac, so we got the water up almost immediately. If we had been away from home, even for a few hours, it would have been a disaster.
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Sharp Dressed Man wrote:

Well, potentially if it can flood a finished area. If the washer is say in an unfinished basement, the potential damages may be less than the cost of the hoses.
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Petey and momma go away for a romantic weekend in the mountains; washing machine hot water inlet hose lets go Friday night at 745 PM. Unattended and undiscovered, water level rises and rises and rises until it reaches electrical switch in washer (or other basement tool/appliance) causing short/spark which starts big fire. Local fire department responds at 3:53 AM but unable to contain fire that burns house down.
Sure hope y'all enjoyed the percale sheets, Champaign and strawberries;-)
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.
I would install a auto shut off valve , turns off water unless washer is running, install new stainless hoses and foreget about it.
if we have a major water line break the water will soon spill out the garage door asnd run down the street. thats assuming the basement floor drain clogs and the sump pump gets overwhelmed.
our basement isnt finished..
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...
If you're going to install an automatic shutoff, rather than get one that handles only the washer, I'd recommend looking into the whole house ones. They use a central AC powered shutoff on the main and wireless water sensors for ANY place you want to protect. The sensors can be AC and/or battery powered. There are advantages and disadvantages to each approach. The obvious advantage to the whole house device is that you can then very easily protect the water heater, ice maker, etc. With the washing machine only type, you've only protected one location.
There is also a unit that just goes on the main and intelligently monitors the water flow. It can be programmed to cut off the flow under varying parameters. For example, if there is even a slow draw of water that continues for more than X minutes, it will cut the flow off. There are varieties of the above devices that will also interface to alarm system, the internet, etc so that you can be notified.
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On Nov 19, 8:37 am, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

rg...
re: There are varieties of the above devices that will also interface to alarm system, the internet, etc so that you can be notified.
Great. So if I'm off on that romantic weekend that Sharped Dressed Man wrote about, and I'm engaged in some sort of romantic "activity", I can get a text that my washer is leaking. Talk about setting the mood.
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Sharp Dressed Man wrote:

Unlike most folks, I always turn off the water to the house if I'm away for more than the afternoon. As for the water levels, in one house the washer is in the unfinished basement with a grade level garage door, so the water level could never get over 1/4" on concrete. In the other house the washer is off the kitchen, on a tiled floor in slab-on-grade construction, with door thresholds, the water might reach 1/2" before flowing over the threshold into the garage and out the garage door.
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Well Pete, you sure seem like the kind of guy who spends all his spare time remembering to jug the washer shut off valve every time he leaves the house, turning it back on when he gets home and running around the basement with a tape measure and a T-square checking clearances and sighting drain angles.
Tell ya' what-- while you're spending all your spare time doing all that, bet I could talk your wife into going to the mountains with me for the weekend;. She'd probably appreciate some attention for a change;-)
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Sharp Dressed Man wrote:

Not the washer shutoff, the water supply to the entire house is turned off as is the water heater. Only takes 1 minute to do both.

My wife is short, furry, has razor sharp claws of doom and doesn't like to travel. She does like hunting mice in the garage however.
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Both hoses are rubber, mainly. Either is apt to fail in 5 years or so...the main difference is the stainless wrapped version will start with a leak that you "may" notice before too much damage is done and the all rubber version will suddenly blow with drastic consequences (flooding).
Tom G.
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Tom G wrote:

to split and develop a leak? Isn't that the main reason for the stainless wrap?
Lou
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Todd wrote:

You could replace them with PEX. I believe you can get hose ends for PEX. That should last a life time.
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