48 volts with switch off!

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On 04/05/09 05:21 pm mm wrote:

LED screw-in replacements for incandescent bulbs. Our local Sam's Club has a few different varieties of them. I have a few that are claimed to be 45W equivalent in light output for a consumption of 3.5W. The light is somewhat blue, but it's fine for my purposes and works fine as a replacement for the previous 50W incandescent flood.

No timer. Just an ordinary mechanical wall switch.
Perce

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On 04/05/09 05:21 pm mm wrote:

LED screw-in replacements for incandescent bulbs. Our local Sam's Club has a few different varieties of them. I have a few that are claimed to be 45W equivalent in light output for a consumption of 3.5W. The light is somewhat blue, but it's fine for my purposes and works fine as a replacement for the previous 50W incandescent flood.

No timer. Just an ordinary mechanical wall switch.
Perce

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On Sun, 05 Apr 2009 16:20:03 -0400, Percival P. Cassidy

48V at high impedance means absolutely nothing.
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On Sun, 05 Apr 2009 22:44:55 -0500, AZ Nomad
off!:

Why is that?
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Cause you can have 48 volts, at zero load. But not enough working amps to do anything useful.
--
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It doesn't indicate any current flow or even potential for current flow. Voltage alone, measured with a high impedance meter is little different than static electricity. Leakage from capacatance between insulators will throw off a high impedance meter.
Put a 1K resistor on it, and the voltage will drop to zero.
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AZ Nomad wrote:

switch is off!
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I agree its the timer. years ago one caused me wierd troubles so I tossed it and went with a old neutral style with mechanical switch it still working fine today. at least 15 years after install
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On 04/06/09 08:35 am bob haller wrote:

No timer or dimmer. A regular on/off wall switch.
Perce
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Try taking one of the wires off the switch , or replace the switch. It may be possiable the switch has developed some leakage across it. Maybe someone tried cleaning it and got some fluid insided the switch.
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Percival P. Cassidy wrote:

Get yourself a "Y" socket adaptor like this:
http://tinyurl.com/d8oha9
With the wall switch OFF, screw the adaptor into the socket of interest and put an LED bulb in one side and measure the "switch off" voltage in the open socket.
Betcha it'll be a lot less than 48 volts then.
Now, screw a regular incandescent bulb into the open socket.
If the LED bulb stops glowing when the incandescent is put in then I agree with the other posters who said that capacitive coupling, probably in a "switch leg" piece of cable is letting enough current run through the LED bulb to make it glow.
You could experiment by screwing a plug adaptor like this:
http://tinyurl.com/dm2rvz
into the open socket so you could easily stick the leads of different value carbon resistors into its slots to see if you could get the LEDs to stop glowing with a resistance value high enough so that if it was permenantly wired across the socket it wouldn't generate much sensible heat.
I'd start with a one watt 20,000 ohm carbon resistor and see if that works. If it does, try an even higher resistance, say 100,000 ohms. If you can get the LEDs to stop glowing with a resistor of 20,000 ohms or greater, then you could wire resistors of that size directly across the fixture socket(s).
Let us all know how you make out.
Jeff
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On 04/06/09 01:19 pm Jeff Wisnia wrote:

I don't need the "Y" adapter, because this is a multi-lamp setup anyway: three lamp fittings on a track. The 48V reading is with identical LED bulbs in the other two fittings.

Yes, with a regular incandescent bulb in one fitting, the LED bulbs in the other two fittings do not glow.

That's an idea. I'll try it when I can get to the store and buy those items.

I will.
Perce
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Percival P. Cassidy wrote:

Oopsie, I assumed 48 volts with NO bulb(s) in the socket(s).
Have you tried that (No bulbs, but with the same meter) and if so does the voltage read higher than 48?

Well, that shoots the phosphorescent glow idea down even more. <G>

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Percival P. Cassidy wrote:

I agree with Jeff (and others).
A common test device is a simple neon light with 2 tests leads. If you plug one lead into the hot side of a receptacle and hold the other lead the neon light will light up (very dimly). This works if you are isolated with only extremely high resistance path to anywhere. There is a *very* small capacitance from your body to the world.
The capacitance between parallel wires is far higher and could drive a small current to the LED bulbs and produce a small amount of light.
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bud-- wrote:

Yup, that human body capacitance is commonly accepted as being 100 picofarads for an avergage sized homo sapiens.
That's the capacitance which stores a high voltage charge when you scuffle across a rug, and then discharges to something else (like your cat's nose) when you get too close to it.
Jeff
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wrote:

I got the same results when I put some LED lights on a light activated switch that used a solidstate switch. The fix was to change it to one that used an internal relay. These can be hard to find.
Jimmie
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