4 pole to 3 pole Extension Cord.


Hello all, I have a small welder that has a three wire (blk/wht/grnd) 230 volt connection and I would like to plug it into my range outlet which is four pole, 40 amp.(blk/wht/red/grnd) My question is how can I connect a three pole receptical onto a four pole lead ? Thank You in advance.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Probably against every code in sight, but the four wire range connection is ground, neutral and the two legs of the 220 volt line -- so that 110 volt components of the range will function. What you need to make up is a four prong plug to three prong SOCKET, where you only bring the two hot lines and the ground across, leaving out the neutral. You should be able to get the parts you need from any good electrical supply house, or Lowes, Home depot. Worst case, if you can't find a three prong socket that goes on a cord, you will have to buy a metal box, plate, and three prong socket. Then bring three wires (of sufficient gauge) from this socket to the four prong plug. If you can't get a four prong plug, a short "pigtail" replacement for a range should do the trick, as that will have the four wires (you are only going to use three) and an attached four prong plug. As to what wire are which, the green should be ground. Use your multimeter to measure which are the 220 volt pair. Tape off the neutral.
That should do the trick.
Go on line to some outfit like United Electrical Supply and see what bits and pieces they have, or Lowes/Home Depot.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
professorpaul wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
professorpaul wrote:

Excellent, Thank You. I do have the proper 40amp three prong plug and this is only to get power to the machine so I can check it out. I will soon have a 100 amps to my shop to properly supply the machine.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
RWEXEC wrote:

Thank to all that replied, my welder works just fine.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@shaw.ca wrote:

If by "four pole lead" you mean the (blk/wht/red/grnd) presently connected to the range outlet.....And you're NOT asking how to put a different plug onto the welder's cord....
Then just wire up a new three pole receptical from the leads which connect to the back of the four pole one, connecting from the "blk" and "red" to the hot slots and the grnd to the third slot on the added receptical. No connection from the "wht" is needed.
Make sure all your connections are worthy of the fairly high currents they'll be handling.
I'm no code mavin, but what I just wrote is electrically correct.
I trust you'll make sure the stove is OFF when you're using the welder. <G>
Jeff
--
Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat \'57 EE)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 04 Jan 2007 13:00:32 -0500, Jeff Wisnia

I think he'lll hve to unplug it, to plug in the welder.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@shaw.ca wrote:

Use the black, red, and green (or bare) wires, and tape up the white wire. Do not accidentally switch the white and green wires when you put the original stove receptacle back.
Best regards, Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Interesting that everyone had the same suggestion. I would have put a 4 prong plug on the welder, with nothing connected to the neutral prong; just seems easier. What is the problem with that?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bewildered wrote:

Dunno, certainly one of the easiest ways to go. No code requirement whatsoever that all the pins on the plug are actually used. Since the OP indicates it's just for testing, were it my welder I'd just grab a suitable spare breaker from my electrical bin and hardwire it to the panel for the half hour of testing.
Pete C.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bewildered wrote:

No problem at all. But it looked to me like the OP wanted to know how to wire a 240v grounded receptacle on a 240/120v grounded cable.
Maybe the welder has a molded plug permanently attached to its cord. (unlikely)
Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Electric ranges typically have a 50 amp circuit breaker. So, yours has 40. That's OK. What's the amperage that your welder uses?
Seems possible, though, to wire an adaptor. Using a range cord, and a welder socket (both often available at the hardware). You could also wire a sub panel off the range socket, and then put in a welder outlet.
--

Christopher A. Young
You can\'t shout down a troll.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Make an adaptor.
--
Steve Barker

< snipped-for-privacy@shaw.ca> wrote in message
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

For your purpose you will want to connect the welder black lead to the socket black, welder white lead to socket red, and ground to ground. There are a few ways you could accomplish this. If the welder uses a regular appliance cord, perhaps one of the "better" ways would be to replace the stock cord with one that uses a plug matching your existing outlet. Save the original cord (I'm assuming it has a molded on plug) in case you move somewhere that has the older style 3 prong plug.
If you want more flexibility, you could make or possibly purchase an adapter. Or, you could of course remove the existing plug and replace it with one that matches the outlet.
--
Contentment makes poor men rich. Discontent makes rich men poor.
--Benjamin Franklin
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

The adapter cord route is what my brother did with his Lincoln 225 buzz box. He had access to a industrial electric supply house, through his job at the time, and got industrial grade fittings and 4 feet or so of the stays-flexible-forever feed cable like used in plant equipment- it ended up looking like a commercial item. He keeps it in the welder tool chest for the once every couple of years he needs it, doing welding for friends at their houses. I don't think you could do as nice with Borg-grade fittings and cable.
aem sends...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.