3 Prong *Plug* with no ground connection?

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Next, please translate the entire thread to "Larry the Cable Guy". For our droll ammusement, chap?
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On 03/02/2012 05:40 PM, Percival P. Cassidy wrote:

Ah, thanks, just needed to keep reading :) So polarity could be important in some cases (radios etc.)
nate
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On 3/2/2012 4:08 PM, The Daring Dufas wrote: ...

Yes, that's all there is to be; they run 240V (or whatever their actual specific level is) just like we run 120V. There's no such thing as 120V as they don't derive it as done in US from the center-tap xfer.
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On Fri, 02 Mar 2012 16:08:45 -0600, The Daring Dufas

Correct. No way to get 120VAC on a Brit mains connection.
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On Fri, 02 Mar 2012 16:34:06 -0500, Percival P. Cassidy wrote:

there's always a fuse[1] in the plug on anything modern; internal on older or user-replaced plugs, and accessed via a door on the underside of the plug on molded plugs. There may or may not be additional fuses in the device itself. The only exception I know of are for electric razors, which use a 2-pin unfused plug (suitable outlets are available for bathrooms with a built-in isolating transformer in the wall plate).
[1] From memory internal plug fuses on domestic AC could be 13A, 10A, 5A, 3A or 2A. Users typically weren't smart enough to use the right fuse for the device - if the original blew, they'd just toss a 13A fuse in there and call it good...
Very old installations do use all sorts of oddball AC plugs and sockets, but those haven't been seen in houses in a *long* time - by the time I was born in '74 the plugs with 3 rectangular pins were in normal use, and as far as I know had been for years.

You know, I think I remember that too - manufacturers would ship a product with bare wires to save costs and expect you to buy and fit your own plug. All kids were taught how to wire a plug at school...

I don't think I've ever seen one of those! Modern UK outlets all have to have an integral switch as part of the wall plate, but that wasn't always the case with older ones, so I could see how a switch in the plug could be useful. I expect they became illegal (to sell as new) when switched wall outlets became mandatory in new work.
cheers
Jules
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On 3/2/2012 8:49 PM, Jules Richardson wrote:

It looks like a sensible wiring system but the darn plugs are the size of a fist. I like my little American plugs. Limey to Yank, "My plug's bigger than your plug!" ^_^
TDD
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On 3/2/2012 8:49 PM, Jules Richardson wrote:

UK plugs have fuses because they are typically on "ring" circuits rated 32A. You don't really want a cord on a 240V circuit protected by 32A.
Back to the US, most receptacles in a residence are now required to be "tamper proof" (child proof). For most of us that means replacement receptacles should be tamper proof.
Switches don't need ground wires unless they are in a plastic box (as someone said). The ground is for metal plates.
The code doesn't care if ground plugs don't have a ground wire. It is unlikely that anything that is UL listed would have that. Again as someone said 2 prong plugs are polarized so that would be unnecessary.
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On Fri, 02 Mar 2012 16:34:06 -0500, "Percival P. Cassidy"

Those switches were so the plugs would not "leak" electricity according to some poorly educated Britts I ran across 40 years ago.
In reality they did tend to eliminate the arcing associated with disconnecting a somewhat inductive (load) device from a relatively high voltage supply.
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On 03/02/12 09:59 pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

My late mother always insisted that the TV had to be unplugged every night because some "fire chief" (or whatever his actual title was) had said that electricity could build up in the set even when it was turned off and cause a fire. Fortunately, their TV was old enough that it didn't have settings that all went away when the set was unplugged (as is the case with a Panasonic we owned).
Perce
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On Fri, 2 Mar 2012 11:08:26 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03

Don't know about the UK and NOW, but in Zambia years back they used the UK style outlets - the switched type and the shuttered type - and there were plugs with plastic pins to open the shutter from what I remember. - If my recollection is correct they would definitely not have been grounded. The pin also establishes polarity (not +/- but line or "neutral")
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On 3/2/2012 12:50 PM, Jules Richardson wrote:

Newer electrical outlets in the U.S. are showing up with safety shutters but I don't believe a ground pin is required to open them, just both flat prongs pushing against the shutters simultaneously. A toddler usually sticks a fork/paperclip into only one opening in an electrical outlet. Of course, I been told that when I was a crawling rug rat, I pulled the power cord from the bottom of my mother's Singer Sewing Machine and stuck it in my mouth. I've had a taste for electricity ever since. I was told that I turned blue(explains the brain damage) and my extremely full diaper(shocked the crap out of me) had to be changed. ^_^
TDD
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On Fri, 2 Mar 2012 10:14:00 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

They got a deal on 3-prong plugs. By buying just them, instead of two kinds, they save.0.01 farthing per plug.

just kidding.

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The correspondent means only that British double-insulated devices with 3-pin plugs (universal in the OK for the last 40 or 50 years) do not ground the 3d pin in the plug. The wall socket 3d hole is of course grounded. British plugs are larger than is usual in the USA and often have fuses inside and/or on/off switches at the top edge of the plug.
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Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
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