3 prong outlet, which way is up?

Page 4 of 6  

On Aug 28, 6:07 pm, "Steve Barker DLT"

every one is installed the other way.
There are only two arguments that seem to make sense.
Ground up, does appear to have a slight safety advantage. Notice I did say SLIGHT.
Ground up does not work well with all plugs (then again ground down does not work well with some other plugs.)
I don't intend to loose sleep over it, but all my plugs that get added or worked on are ground up.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Aug 29, 9:45 am, snipped-for-privacy@columbus.rr.com wrote:

I find it funny that the NEC seems to cover every detail you could think of, but not this one.
Mark
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
that's because it doesn't matter.
s
I find it funny that the NEC seems to cover every detail you could think of, but not this one.
Mark
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Aug 29, 12:14 pm, "Steve Barker DLT"

well it does matter in the sense that many cords and wall warts seem to hang better with the ground pin down....but many commercial buildings seem to have the ground pin up...
It would be nice in this case if there WAS a standard way to do it... The NEC seems to want to define everything, here is a case where we NEED a standard and they didn't do it....
I don't care which way, just pick one way and make all the plugs play well with that way...
Mark
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8/29/2008 12:53 PM Mark spake thus:

Except that, as someone else pointed out, almost all wall warts have 2 prongs and no ground pin.
--
"In 1964 Barry Goldwater declared: \'Elect me president, and I
will bomb the cities of Vietnam, defoliate the jungles, herd the
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 29 Aug 2008 15:47:33 -0700, David Nebenzahl

However, some (for no apparent reason) have POLARIZED plugs. That has the same effect as having a ground pin, for limiting the ways they can be turned.
--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.laughingsquid.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The "invisible" reason would be the type of cktry in the warts types. To some styles, as it used to be with TV sets, the polarity of hot/neutral was important. But if an item is fully Class II designed, then it doesn't need polarization. They can also use polarity to meet certain safety ratings, such as having to cover more than one receptable position. You don't find many polarized wall warts anymore though.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 1 Sep 2008 12:10:22 -0400, "TWayne"
[snip]

For the ones (wall wart power supplies) I've examined, the prongs of the plug are connected directly to the ends of the transformer primary. There seems to be nothing special about one or the other. This doesn't stop some manufacturers from using polarized plugs.

Would these ratings be nonsense, or is there actually some benefit to using polarization here?

Why would a low-power device be designed to prevent use of a receptacle?

--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.laughingsquid.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

True; many will use whatever is cheapest and already on the market.

It's a UL/CSA/ETL thing. To me it's nonsense, but that's what the specs require for many of them. One reason I still recall is, due to the weight of the warts, they do not want more than one hung on a vertical outlet on the wall. I used to have to spec supplies for our telecom equipment (R&D) which meant passing all the safety agencies. I try when I can to get things with warts that have cords on both sides; the primary and secondary both; more wire to hide, but more fit to a power strip. I haven't seen a polarized direct plug in in a long, long time though IIRC.

As I mentioned above, the weight of the wart/s on the receptable seemed to be the main reason. They aren't really considered "low power" because you have line power coming into it and processed to produce whatever kind of output/s was/were required. IIRC too, there was some magic weight where even a non-polarized wart had to extend far enough to negate using any receptacle next to it. We accomodated that by adding a lip to the far end that covered most, not all, of any receptacle in the opposite side.
There was more to all of this, but I've been out of the business for a long time. I know Ault used to have a great web site with all the UL/CSA and MOU plain language requirements on it; don't know if they still do.
Cheers,
Twayne

Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
> Ground up does not work well with all plugs (then again ground

I recently bought some power strips for the office and the plug rotates so it can be use in either direction or even at 45 degrees if you want. All the new recepticals installed during a remodel are ground up.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I just saw a 3-pack of "outlet savers" in a store. Those are the things that are supposed to let you use all the outlets in a power strip, even when you have several wall-warts. $2 each is a really high price to pay for 6-inch extension cords.
--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.laughingsquid.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

re: $2 each is a really high price to pay for 6-inch extension cords.
Price out your other options.
Let's say you have 5 or 6 warts and an outlet strip that will only accommodate 3.
Option 1 - Another power strip. Takes up more space, won't be fully utilized and probably costs more than $6.
Option 2 - Longer extension cords. Takes up more space (sloppy) and probably costs more than $6
Option 3 - Spread your warts out to other outlets. Assuming that's possible, what's the convenience of having all the warts in one place worth to you? Probably more than $6.
Option 4 - Make your own 6-inch exttension cords. A viable option, but it'll probably cost close to $6 for all the parts, although you will have the pleasure of making your own and saying "shove it" to corporate America. :-)
All in all, I'm not sure that "$2 each is a really high price to pay for 6-inch extension cords"
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The labor cost is the same to put the ends on a 6" cord as for a 10' cord. How about you make me up a half dozen for a buck apiece?
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

re: The "labor" is done by a machine
Are machines free?
Fine, have it your way...
The machine cost is the same to put the ends on a 6" cord as for a 10' cord.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote in message

Oh I didn't realize the machine went to the storeroom to get the parts, then assembled them and put them into finished goods inventory all with no people involved and no cost for the machine since there is no operator. Thank you for correcting my error.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

And don't forget that the machine fixes itself too.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote in message

Yea, they're pretty sophisticated these days ;-)
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
LouB wrote:

not the beer itself. Per oz, a keg is the cheapest way to buy beer. Unit cost for consumer goods can never drop below a certain point, or there would be no reason for the product to be made, because nobody would make any money on it.
-- aem sends...
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

At least they could use the same ends as the 10' cords. Those ends allow 2 or 3 wall-warts instead of just one like those 6" cords.
--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.laughingsquid.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.