3" pipe???

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I don't understand what is broken. Is the trap broken? Is the vertical Tee broken? Does the Tee have broken pipe stuck on its threads? Where is the 3" long piece of 3" pipe?
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On Saturday, June 21, 2014 9:27:22 AM UTC-4, Pico Rico wrote:

The 3" piece of pipe is the close nipple between the trap and the Tee. It's covered in red tape. I'm not so sure it's actually 3" diameter, it looks like it could be smaller to me.
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On 6/21/2014 8:27 AM, Pico Rico wrote: ...

The threads on nipple with the red tape wrapped around it to prevent the drip were apparently twisted off at the junction when the cleanout guy removed the trap. Seems that was able to rethread the trap onto remaining threads enough to get by for a while. One can see the nipple is now short by the offset from the sink drain now required to hit the trap entrance.
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On 6/21/2014 9:28 AM, trader_4 wrote: ...

I agree on that on the size--2" more like it, methinks...unless that drain from the sink is 2" which would be remarkable...
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Novel,

Thanks. As I suspected, the photo tells a lot more about the situation.
1. The existing plumbing does appear to be galvanized steel.
2. Using the plastic tail pipe as reference, it looks like 2" pipe, though it could be 1.5" (width, not length).
3. The piece you need is a pipe nipple. However, with the limited space you probably need a "close" nipple. Basically, this just means the short segment of pipe is threaded from end to end so the fittings can fit "close" together.
4. The tee the pipe nipple threads into appears to be installed upside down. The side inlet should slope downward so water can flow down the drain properly. Yours looks like it slopes upwards toward the vent. Ideally, that should be replaced.
5. It's hard to tell from the small photo, but it looks like there's another piece of tape (duct tape?) wrapped around the pipe below the tee. Was that another leak?
If it was me, I would replace the existing trap and tee with all new PVC or ABS pipe. To avoid issues with trying to dismantle old corroded fittings, I would probably just cut the galvanized pipe with a hacksaw below the tee and use a Fernco coupling to add the new parts. You may want to support the pipe above and below the point you're cutting it so it doesn't drop into the floor if it's not properly anchored.
Good luck!
Anthony Watson www.mountainsoftware.com www.watsondiy.com
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On Saturday, June 21, 2014 1:21:46 PM UTC-4, HerHusband wrote:

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It's hard to tell from the small photo, but it looks like there's

Anthony, yes a 'real plumber' did that years ago before I bought the house according to the previous owner in order to snake it straight down and the n taped it. I am a diy..but particularly not in plumbing of that nature so i would have to leave all to the discretion of a real plumber. To the best of my knowledge, PVC's are not allowed or were not allowed in NYC.
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On 6/21/2014 12:21 PM, HerHusband wrote: ...

...
Good catch on the the swept-tee being upside down--I didn't notice it was anything other than an ordinary tee.
If it were mine, the idea of fixing the T is good; I'd go w/ a reducing sweep tee if can find one; if not use a bushing to go to standard 1-1/2" drain and then can go to the run-of-the-mill currently available selection of drain parts from any corner hardware.
The tee may be a bit of a challenge locally at anything other than a full-supply plumbing supply house, however; a quick search of the BORG stock didn't show that they had any sweep tees at all, what more a 3x3x1-1/2 or whatever it actually is (I'm still thinking that isn't 3" line, too). It really doesn't look like there's anything wrong w/ the one there itself altho the question of what the tape below is doing there is a possible worry.
In fact, now that I look at that again, wondering about the question of dissassembly, there's a bushing in the bottom outlet and it may well be that it's a reducing tee itself as I can't now convince myself the bottom D is as large as the inlet and tee sides. It may be 3x2x3; the top surely is pretty-good-sized.
Looking at the practicality of it, unless there's an issue from the tee down, I'd just plan on replacing the nipple w/ a reducer as above--the reversed sweep clearly worked for a long time; I'd probably wait until there were reasons to redo a bunch before tackling that much unless OP just wants to do it now...
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On Saturday, June 21, 2014 1:58:09 PM UTC-4, dpb wrote:

All of the above is why I said it's probably not a good idea for the OP to be going out to buy a 3" close nipple. A lot of possible factors that could go into how the repair is done. I agree it was a good catch by HH, that the T looks like it's installed in the wrong direction. Hard to tell for sure though from the pic. Also interesting is what that tape below is doing there. If all is sound except the nipple, and the cause of problems hasn't been the T, then I'd agree with you, I'd just leave the T alone and work from there. But I'd leave it for the person doing the work to decide how to proceed.
I'd suggested previously that maybe there is enough room so you could put a reducing bushing in the T, then go to a new P trap with a slip joint so that it can properly align. The way this thing was done, it depends on the length of that nipple, how far it goes in when tightened up to get a vertical alignment with the sink tailpiece. Not a good way of doing things.
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On Sat, 21 Jun 2014 17:21:46 +0000 (UTC), HerHusband

That seems to be the best solution. Fernco couplings are your friend.
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On Sat, 21 Jun 2014 03:47:58 +0000 (UTC), HerHusband

In DRAINS it is common to have threaded brass" tail-pieces" that corrode and break off. Generally they thread in one end and have a "compression sleave" type connection at the other end to seal what is in reality a slip fit joint.
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On Sat, 21 Jun 2014 06:27:22 -0700, "Pico Rico"

What he needs is a proper plumber to replace the whole messed up abortion of a drain system he has there. The T-Y into the drain is installed upside-down, for starters. I've not seen a galvanized drain system in over 40 years - And the tailpiece into the trap doesn't line up straight - so the nipple, if he was going to just replace it, needs to be about half an inch longer. Removing the broken nipple from the fitting without breaking the pipe above or below is a crap-shoot at best. I don't blame the drain-cleaner for not getting involved in the repair. It's got trouble written all over it. Impossible to give an estimate on, because there is no way to know where you will eventually be able to stop.
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On Saturday, June 21, 2014 8:21:46 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

That's probably because it's just a close nipple. Nipples don't come in any size you want. Which is why I suggested that if he's lucky, there might be enough room to go with a new P trap that has a slip joint fitting on the end that goes to the tee, so the length doesn't matter.

It's not clear, but the drain guy may have already unscrewed the nipple from the tee. If not, I agree, that could be a PIA. And it sure looks like the tee is upside down. I guess if it's worked relatively trouble free for 50 years, it can be left there, unless, as you say, it's shot too. If this sink has had regular trouble though, the incorrect tee may be part of the problem.

Agree. Which is why I advised that going out to buy a 3" by 3" nipple might not be a good idea.
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And he'll need an "inside" pipe wrench too- - - -.
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On Sat, 21 Jun 2014 17:21:46 +0000 (UTC), HerHusband

+1 on the "good luck"
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The scary part is that pipe just MIGHT also be the vent stack - - - - - -
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And if using a fernco, (actually 2 of them) you WILL want the ones with the stainless steel wrap on them (Fernco Sheilded Couplings) if that pipe is, as I suspect, the vent stack.
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Novel,

As far as I know, PVC and ABS are standard in the national plumbing codes. Of course, it's entirely possible you have a local code that supercedes the national code. If that's the case, you would probably have to go with galvanized again. Here in Washington state, I don't think I've ever even seen a galvanized P-trap. :)
From the photo and what you're describing, it sounds like the plumbing has been pieced together and patched up over the years. It probably needs updating, but then you run into the old issue of how far do you go. Problems tend to escalate when you're dealing with old pipe. It could turn into a real headache.
As another poster mentioned, if you can get that old pipe nipple out without breaking things, it might be smart to just replace that and leave the rest alone. At least until you can afford to update the rest of the plumbing.
Good luck!
Anthony Watson www.mountainsoftware.com www.watsondiy.com
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On 6/22/2014 2:17 AM, HerHusband wrote:

I've not kept up, but many big cities with strong unions don't follow the national codes. Philadelphia used to insist on copper for water pipes, Chicago used to insist on conduit, not Romex for wiring. Things may have changed, but they kept the union members entrenched for a long time after the rest of the country modernized.
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On Sunday, June 22, 2014 9:35:10 AM UTC-4, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Googling, apparently nyc changed a few years ago. Looks like PVC is allowed for residential, 5 stories or less. OP could check, to be sure, if they really care for just a trap.
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I must have missed your earlier post, but your suggestion is a good option. That would give a little bit of horizontal adjustment for aligning the P- Trap.
Of course, if NYC doesn't allow plastic pipe as Novel thinks, that may not be an option.
Anthony Watson www.mountainsoftware.com www.watsondiy.com
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