3-in-1 oil in an electric motor

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With today being very cold and the furnace about to run a lot, I realized that the electric motor that runs the burner in my oil furnace hadn't been oiled in a year. I remember in years past having asked the furnace-maintenance guy if it was okay to use 3-in-1 Multipurpose Household oil in the burner's oil cup. He'd said it was okay. So that's what I put in, about 8 drops. (The can must be 10 years old so any volatile ingredients might have evaporated.)
Then I did some online research and have read that is not okay to use that. So I went to Lowes and got 3-in-1 Motor Oil SAE 20. Can I put that in to flush out the Household oil with the penetrant that's in the Household oil? Is this a big problem, or am I worried for nothing?
Is it possible to put too much oil into that hole for the oil cup and cause damage somehow?
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On 1/3/2012 6:07 PM, Ed wrote:

I'd go ahead and add the SAE 20. I can't think of how too much could do any harm except that it could find it's way to the vanes of the blower and that would make it a dust magnet. So wait until spring and remove and clean the whole blower, it's probably long overdue anyway.
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Oil cup on a furnace? I haven't seen one of those in decades. If it's as old as I think it is I'd forget about what kind of oil to use and start looking at how much a new one will save in heating costs, payback time, etc.
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People have been using 3-in-1 Multipurpose Household oil on motors for decades. I doubt anything evaporated as long as the cap was on the can. The idea is to lube the motor bearings and that's what you did. Dont worry about it.....
Personally, I think 3-in-1 Multipurpose Household oil is an expensive way to oil things. Buy a pump oiler can, get a quart of non-detergent straight weight SAE 20 oil, and use that in the future.
If it makes you feel better, go ahead and add 3 or 4 drops of your new product. You dont want to flood the motor and get it all over the windings, but SAE 20 is heavier, and a few more drops wont hurt. I do personally feel that a heavier oil is better suited to large motors and stays on the bearings better. That thin 3-in-1 Multipurpose Household oil is more suited to sewing machines and tiny motors.
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On Tue, 03 Jan 2012 23:43:13 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

Many years ago, I'd have agreed with you. Seems like everything today is electronic or has sealed bearings. I cannot think of a single thing that I've oiled in years. I have a little can of some kind of multi-purpose oil and I bet it is 30 years old.
I have a spray can of Big 90 that I've had for many years and I've used it on a hinge or two. Last pump oil can I bought was 45 years ago and I have no idea where it disappeared to.
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As a farmer, I am constantly oiling and greasing stuff. Lots of larger motors on farm machinery need to be oiled. "Sealed bearings" is just another way to say "disposible motor". When the bearings seize up, you toss the motor, spend a couple hundred bucks for a new one and more if you need an installerm V/S spending 5 minutes and 5 cents worth of oil every year. I have machinery motors that date back to the 1950's and 60's that still work fine, but I need to oil then yearly. But we live in a disposible society and most people would rather help fill up a garbage dump and spend a large sum of money every 5 years, than spend any time oiling a motor. For me, when I had a furnace that needed oil on motors (and most forced air blower bearings still require oil),, I just did it in fall when I changed the furnace filter the first time before winter. At the same time I would oil every other motor, door hinges and whatever needed it in the house. A half hour of time at most was needed to do all that stuff. A pump oiler can is always available.
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On 1/4/2012 12:54 PM, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

Um, where are the grease fittings located on your average cow? ^_^
TDD
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On 1/4/2012 6:17 PM, The Daring Dufas wrote:

They get "Bag Balm" grease on their teats.
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Helps em slide from stall to pasture? Makes em moooove easier?
Keep em from watching TV, or they will go liberal, and joine MOOOVE on dot org. You know how cows love Obamoooooo.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
On 1/4/2012 6:17 PM, The Daring Dufas wrote:

They get "Bag Balm" grease on their teats.
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Shoulders, knees, other rotating joints. Silly!
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .

Um, where are the grease fittings located on your average cow? ^_^
TDD
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On Wed, 04 Jan 2012 17:17:37 -0600, The Daring Dufas

Just below the tail - but the grease comes OUT.
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Sounds to me like your dipstick has fallen out of the filler tube, and it's coming out the overflow.
Steve
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You've obviosly never been "greased" by a cow.
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On Wed, 04 Jan 2012 17:17:37 -0600, The Daring Dufas

Geezzzzzz, I can tell you are a city guy....... There's a grease fitting right behind every teat, and another one right under their poop chute. Next time you visit your grandfather's farm, crawl under a cow and look! Take a grease gun filled with udder balm with you.....
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On 1/6/2012 3:38 AM, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

Did my post about greasing up the teats with Bag Balm show up? I'm mostly curious so I know to send it again if it doesn't show up on my news group. Happens now and then.
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On 1/6/2012 2:38 AM, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

I grew up on a farm too but we had no cows just tractors and I could never get milk to come out of the tractors, perhaps they were all male? ^_^
TDD
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Most new genetically modified tractors have tiny, tiny little teats. Almost can't find them.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
I grew up on a farm too but we had no cows just tractors and I could never get milk to come out of the tractors, perhaps they were all male? ^_^
TDD
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You sound like an old man who has gained a lot of wisdom. What kind of oil do you use? ND30, or what?
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
As a farmer, I am constantly oiling and greasing stuff. Lots of larger motors on farm machinery need to be oiled. "Sealed bearings" is just another way to say "disposible motor". When the bearings seize up, you toss the motor, spend a couple hundred bucks for a new one and more if you need an installerm V/S spending 5 minutes and 5 cents worth of oil every year. I have machinery motors that date back to the 1950's and 60's that still work fine, but I need to oil then yearly. But we live in a disposible society and most people would rather help fill up a garbage dump and spend a large sum of money every 5 years, than spend any time oiling a motor. For me, when I had a furnace that needed oil on motors (and most forced air blower bearings still require oil),, I just did it in fall when I changed the furnace filter the first time before winter. At the same time I would oil every other motor, door hinges and whatever needed it in the house. A half hour of time at most was needed to do all that stuff. A pump oiler can is always available.
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On Wed, 4 Jan 2012 18:55:06 -0500, "Stormin Mormon"

Non Detergent is really not a "requirement" - don't think a normal ball or sleeve bearing cares one way or the other.
Same for multigrade - a straight grade oil MAY stand up a bit better - but I doubt the difference would be noticeable, personally.
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The problem with three in one is that it dries up, and gets sticky. I've had that happen on fans. Yes, I'd try a couple drops of ND-20 or ND-30. Won't flush the three in one out, but might help.
About 1990 or so, long before I got my start in the HVAC trade. The blower on my furnace started howling. It was bedtime, and I didn't think I wanted to call HVAC tech, figured it would be expensive. Found the oil ports for the motor, and forced in some oil that I had. I think I used 10w30, which is the wrong stuff. But, it got me by for a while. Now, I've got the "right oil" available.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
With today being very cold and the furnace about to run a lot, I realized that the electric motor that runs the burner in my oil furnace hadn't been oiled in a year. I remember in years past having asked the furnace-maintenance guy if it was okay to use 3-in-1 Multipurpose Household oil in the burner's oil cup. He'd said it was okay. So that's what I put in, about 8 drops. (The can must be 10 years old so any volatile ingredients might have evaporated.)
Then I did some online research and have read that is not okay to use that. So I went to Lowes and got 3-in-1 Motor Oil SAE 20. Can I put that in to flush out the Household oil with the penetrant that's in the Household oil? Is this a big problem, or am I worried for nothing?
Is it possible to put too much oil into that hole for the oil cup and cause damage somehow?
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