3/4" vs. 1" pipe for service line to house

Just wondering if there is any reason to use 1" pipe when replacing my service line. I'm thinking there isn't since 3/4" pipe is running through the slab to the main shut off valve, and I won't be replacing that.
--Art
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You will get more water with a larger pipe and if you have a 1" pipe from the main to the meter, but a 3/4" meter, you would have the option of "upgrading" to a 1" meter. This all would come in handy if you want a lawn sprinkler system or outside water faucets. Then in theory you would have more water flow inside your house while watering outside and more water flow outside.
In my case I want to eventually install a lawn sprinkler system, so I would prefer a 1" main.
Note: My city requires a 1" main for new service and I think replacement of existing mains as well.
"Art M" wrote in message

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I agree. I've suffered the misery of having a 3/4 inch line. I recommend you go with 1 inch line up to the slab.
By the way, that line in the slab will eventually clog with sediment and need replacing or bypassing. Don't worry, it is not that big a task. A jack hammer and boring tools will make short work of it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Go with the 1" copper tube, you"ll be happier.
I did 25 years ago & the flow to the house, sprinklers & hoses is just great.
Hose shoots water 40' while the washer is filling!
cheers Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Well, I'm not looking forward to that. I was in a hurry and didn't check back here, so I went with 3/4". Thanks anyways for the responses.
--Art
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 27 Sep 2005 08:57:59 -0400, "Art M"

I live on a farm. When I ran my waterlines from the well to the buildings, I started out with 1". The barn and one shed have 1". When I ran the line to the house, I ran out of the 1" pipe, it was Sunday and the stores were closed. My neighbor had some 3/4". I was in a hurry an wanted to save a buck. BIG MISTAKE !!!! I have forever regretted it. There just is inadaquate pressure at the house. Actually, the pressure "INSIDE" the house is fine for normal sinks, toilet and shower. It's the house outdoor spigot that is much slower when I fill the livestock tank for the horses behind the house. It's just much slower than in the barn, and on a freezing winter day, standing in the snow with a slow hose is really annoying.
You might save $10 or $20 on pipe and fittings, but the trenching costs hundreds if not thousands of dollars, not to mention the work and the mess. DO IT RIGHT THE FIRST TIME.
Personally, since you are already digging it up, put the 1' thru the slab right to the main shutoff and be done with it. This will save one more underground splice that could leak later. Note: Forget the "slab" pipe, run the new line thru the concrete block wall a few inches above the slab. (much easier).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Heh, all these stories about how 3/4" isn't enough. I have 5/8" coming in which was reduced to 1/2" shortly after the meter.
My water pressure is fine.... as long as only one fixture is open at a time.
I planned on replacing most of the plumbing and only using 1/2" to feed off of the main, which was going to be kept at 3/4" throughout. I wonder if I should just think about having my main changed to 1". Then they could change my crumby 3" main sewer line while they're at it. I can't believe turds can flow through there. :-D
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.