240v Garage Circuit Installation Cost?

For those who hired an electrician to install a shop 240v circuit. What did it cost and were you satisfied with the work? What would you do differently if you had to do it over again?
Thanx
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On Fri, 16 Dec 2005 14:02:32 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@spam.invalid (realeyz) wrote:

I ran my own, and it cost over $140 parts at home depot and 4 hours of labor. I didn't know breakers were so high.
My next project will add a larger panel so watch out.
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Distance, degree of difficulty, size of wire, amount of conductors ( 3wire, 4 wire). Amount of space in the panel and the list goes on.
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I just installed a transfer switch with the outlet in my garage. That is pretty equivalent to your project. Running the cable through 40 joists took hours. Had the panel backup to the garage, I might have done it in one hour. On the other hand, if it involves going through finished walls and floors, it could take days. So, it all depends.
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It all depends. How far. How much amperage. Do you want conduit, or just Romex stapled up. Size of box. Quality of breakers. Quality of plugs. Type(s) of plugs. Do you want different configurations of plugs so you can plug in different things?
I got mine through a friend who is a union electrician. All parts were top quality from government jobs. All work done by a journeyman. Just cost a few beers.
If there is anything different I would do, I wouldn't let him have his first beer until he was almost done.
Steve
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Figure between $100 and $1000 depending of location, degree of difficulty running the wire, amps, etc. If you have any type of shop out there, consider having a sub panel installed and circuits for power tools and such.
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Here is what my panel looks like:
http://www.realeyz.com/misc/elec_panel.jpg
I want to add two 220v circuits and probably one additional 120v - all of it can be run on external conduit line and external outlets so no wall running will be necessary as my garage is fully insulated and drywalled. (btw whats the diff between 110 and 120v - 220 and 240v besides the voltage?)
Also how can I measure the available amperage / voltage at an outlet so I know if I am starving my table saw or not and won't hurt the motor? Any links to proper electrical tools for this would be helpful.
Thanx everyone! - todd
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On Sat, 17 Dec 2005 08:01:59 +0000, realeyz wrote:

You're going to need to add a sub-panel and move at least one 220 (or two 120 circuits) to the sub-panel. You can then wire the new circuits to the sub-panel.

They're all 120/240V now. Some just call them 110 or 220. No biggie.

You don't measure available "amperage". It's based on the breaker (which is based on the wire size). The voltage can be measured with a multimeter (be carefull!)

Fluke makes nice multimeters, though a tad on the expensive side for most homeowners. I've bought a few $3 specials from Harbor Freight that I throw in my tool boxes. I also use them for loaners, since I've had a couple of Flukes forget their way home.
--
Keith

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